Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2063575 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1936
Filing dateMar 31, 1934
Priority dateMar 31, 1934
Publication numberUS 2063575 A, US 2063575A, US-A-2063575, US2063575 A, US2063575A
InventorsAdams Elmer Wade
Original AssigneeStandard Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispersing of phenolphthalein in mineral lubricating oils
US 2063575 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Dec. 8, 1936 UNITED STATES DISPERSING OF PHENOLPHTHALEIN IN IVIINERAL LUBRIQATING OILS Elmer Wade Adams, Hammond, Ind., assignor to Standard Oil Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Indiana No Drawing. Application March 31, 1934,

Serial No. 718,529

. 8 Claims. My invention relates to the dispersion of preferentially alcohol soluble materials in mineral oils.' More particularly it relates to the dispersion of preferentially alcohol soluble materials- 10 particularly lubricating oils, by the use of alcohols having molecular weights greater than that of the propanols. My invention also relates to the products resulting from mynew method of dispersion.

It has been proposed to provide a means for the identification of mineral oils by incorporating therein asmall portion of an indicator or other relatively colorless material which will form a detectable color on treatment with a'suit- 20 able chemical reagent. Thus, for instance, it

has been proposed to provide a means for identifying lubricating oils by incorporating therein a trace of phenolphthalein (dihydroxyphthalophenone) which will form a brilliant red colora- 25 tion when the oil is-shaken with an aqueous alkaline solution. The idea is simple but it' has not been satisfactorily accomplished in the past due to the difliculty of incorporating the phenolphthalein in the oil. Phenolphthalein, being 80 preferentially soluble in water and the alcohols rather than in mineral oils, cannot readily be incorporated directly in the oil. Neither can it be incorporated satisfactorily in solution in such a material as ethanol. Thus, for example, when 0.25 ounce of phenolphthalein is dissolved in one pint of ethanol, the solution is added to 10,000

gallons of lubricating oil, and the phenolphthalein is distributed in the oil by the normal air blowing method, it .is found that the phenolphthalein concentration in the oil diminishes gradually, due to preciptation, thereby destroying its quantitative value in detecting adulteration. Furthermore, when the solution of phenol- 45 phthalein in oil is filtered, for instance through ordinary filter paper, the phenolphthalein is completely removed. V

I have overcome these difficulties by first dissolving the phenolphthalein in an alcohol, preferably a mono-hydroxy alcohol, having a molecular weight greater than that of the propanols, for instance: the butanols, the pentanols, the hexanols, the heptanols or mixtures of any of 55 these with each other and/or with up to about 50% of methanol and/or ethanol. I prefer, however, to use normal butanol.

Thus, for instance, when 0.25 ounce of phenolphthalein is dissolved in one pint of normal butanol and the solution thus formed is added to 10,000 gallons of lubricating oil it can be distributed uniformly throughout the oil by agitating by the normal air blowing method without precipitation of the phenolphthalein. Furthermore, when the oil solution thus formed by the use of normal butanol is filtered, for instance through ordinary filter paper, the phenolphthalein is not removed as was the case when it was added in ethanol solution. I am not aware just what the reason is for the peculiar action of this relatively minute amount of higher alcohol, but I believe it may be attributed, to the formation of a loose chemical compound or alcoholate between the phenolphthalein and the higher alcohol.

The amount of phenolphthalein and the amount of alcohol can be varied within wide limits, thus, for instance, from 0.05 ounce to one pound or even more of phenolphthalein and from five ounces to gallons or even more of alcohol having a molecular weight greater than that of the propanols, preferably normal butanol, can be used per 10,000 gallons of oil. The

upper limits of both the phenolphthalein and the .7 I

alcohol are determined by economic factors.

This method can be used in dispersing phenolphthalein in other mineral -oils,--for instance: gasoline, kerosene, furnace oil, fuel oil, etc. Other preferentially water or alcohol soluble indicators or dye -intermediates can thus be distributed, for instance: phenylenediamine, methyl orange (the sodium salt of helianthine), bromophenol blue (tetrabromophenolsulfonphthalein),

etc.

The same method can be utilized forintro ducing preferentially water or alcohol soluble dyestuffs in mineral oils, for instance: spirit dyes, such as alizarine (dihydroxy anthroquanone (1,2), eosine '(tetrabromofiuoresceinl and its alkaline salts, fluorescein (resorcinphthalein) auramin, malachite green (tetramethyldi-.paminotriphenyl carbohydride' hydrochloride) cyanine, etc. Still other preferentially water or alcohol soluble materials such as antioxidants, antiknock improvers, etc. can thus be introduced.

The amount ofpreferentially alcohol soluble material tobe added will, of course, vary greatly with the potency of the particular material chosen, the result to be accomplished, etc. In genera] the amount will range from, say, 0.01 ounce to five pounds, or preferably .05 ounce to one pound, per 10,000 gallons of mineral oil. The amount of higher alcohol necessary to disperse this material in accordance with my invention will also vary greatly but, in general, may range from one ounce to 25 gallons, or preferably from five ounces to one gallon per.10,000 gallons of mineral oil.

While I have described my invention in connection with certain specific embodiments and in connection with certain theories of operation it is to be understood that these are by way of illustration rather than by way of limitation and I do not intend to be limited thereby except to the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: I

1. A method of dispersing phenolphthalein in mineral lubricating oil, comprising dissolving ap proximately 0.25 ounce of phenolphthalein in approximately one pint of normal butanol, introducing the solution thus formed into approx mately 10,000 gallons of mineral lubricating oil and distributing the said solution throughout the said oil by blowing with air.

2. Fluid oils, comprising the following materials in approximately the following proportions: mineral oil, 10,000 gallons; preferentially alcohol soluble material selected from the group consisting of the dyestuffs, the dye intermediates, the indicators, the antioxidants and the antiknock improvers, from 0.01 ounce to five pounds; a monohydroxy alcohol having a molecular weight greator than that of propanol, from one ounce to 25 gallons.

3. Fluid oils, comprising the following materials in approximately the following proportions: mineral lubricating oil, 10,000 gallons; phenolphthalein, 0.25 ounce; normal butanol, one pint.

4. The method of dispersing phenolphthalein in mineral lubricating oils comprising dissolving said phenolphthalein in normal butyl alcohol and introducing the solution thus formed into the mineral oil.

5. A fluid oil composition comprising a solution of mineral lubricating oil, phenolphthalein and normal butyl alcohol.

6. The method of dispersing phenolphthalein in a mineral lubricating oil comprising dissolving said phenolphthalein in a normally liquid aliphatic alcohol having a molecular weight greater than that of the propanols and introducing the solution thus formed into the mineral oil.

7. The method of dispersing phenolphthalein in mineral lubricating oils comprising dissolving sail phenolphthalein in a normally liquid aliphatic alcohol having a molecular weight greater than that of the propanols, introducing the solution thus formed into the mineral oil, and agitating the admixture by blowing with air.

- 8. A fluid oil composition comprising a solution of mineral lubricating oil, phenolphthalein and a normally liquid aliphatic alcohol having a molecular weight greater than that of the propanols.

ELMER WADE ADAMS.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

atent No. 2,065,575. December 8, 1936.

ELMER WADE ADAMS.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 2, strike out all of claim 2 and for the claim numbers "3" "4" 5" "6", "'7" and "8" read 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 respectively; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 16th day of February, A. D. 1937.

Henry Van Arsdale Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2451022 *Feb 28, 1944Oct 12, 1948Frederick C DohrmannColor changing antiseptic composition
US5672182 *Jul 26, 1996Sep 30, 1997United Color Manufacturing Inc.Developer system for base reactable petroleum fuel markers
US6482651Jun 30, 1999Nov 19, 2002United Color Manufacturing, Inc.Aromatic esters for marking or tagging petroleum products
EP0073758A1 *Mar 11, 1981Mar 16, 1983John Edward MchughTreatment of inflammatory viral infections, acne, dermatitis and arthritis conditions.
EP0073758A4 *Mar 11, 1981Jul 4, 1983John Edward MchughTreatment of inflammatory viral infections, acne, dermatitis and arthritis conditions.
EP0311790A1 *Sep 9, 1988Apr 19, 1989BASF AktiengesellschaftMarked mineral oil product, and process to mark mineral oil products
WO1996000272A1 *Jun 16, 1995Jan 4, 1996Basf AktiengesellschaftUse of leucotriarylmethanes for marking hydrocarbons
WO1996022345A1 *Dec 22, 1995Jul 25, 1996United Color Manufacturing, Inc.Fluorescent petroleum markers
WO1996032461A1 *Apr 2, 1996Oct 17, 1996United Color Manufacturing, Inc.Developer system for base reactable petroleum fuel markers
WO1996032462A1 *Apr 2, 1996Oct 17, 1996United Color Manufacturing, Inc.Colorless petroleum markers