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Publication numberUS2063922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1936
Filing dateOct 25, 1934
Priority dateOct 25, 1934
Publication numberUS 2063922 A, US 2063922A, US-A-2063922, US2063922 A, US2063922A
InventorsGreenberg Morris W
Original AssigneeGreenberg Morris W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment measuring device
US 2063922 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 15, 1936. M w, GREENBERG 2,063,922

GARMENT MEASURING DEVICE Filed Oct. 25, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ATTORN EYS Dec. 15, 1936. M w, GREENBERG 2,063,922

GARMENT MEASURING DEVICE Filed Oct. 25, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 a lzvENToR BY TTORNEY Patented Dec. 15, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 15 Claims.

This invention relates to a garment measuring device and particularly to a device of this character which permits of determining the stoop or inclination of the person being measured, the height of the shoulders as well as any difference between the height of the respective shoulders, and also the depth of the indentation in the back at the Waist-line, and thereby enables the tailor when cutting and making a suit for the respective person to more accurately fit the suit and with a minimum expenditure of time, thereby reducing the cost of production.

It is the object or this invention to provide a device of this character which is very simple in construction and not only capable of. being readily used to advantage by a tailor, but which is also so organized that the same can be quickly folded into compact form for greater convenience in storing the same away when not in use, and also permitting the same to be conveniently transported by mail or otherwise for distribution to the trade.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of my improved garment measuring device showing the manner in which it is used when applied to a person being measured.

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the same.

Figure 3 is a top plan view thereof.

Figure 4 is a rear elevation of the same with a part broken away.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal section, on an enlarged scale, taken on line 55 Fig. 4.

Figures 6 and 7 are fragmentary vertical transverse sections, taken on the correspondingly numbered lines in Fig. 5.

In the following description similar characters of reference indicate like parts in the several figures of the drawings.

In its general organization this garment measuring device comprises a main support or frame upon which the several movable parts of the measuring device are mounted, means mounted on the upper part of this support for indicating or measuring the stoop or inclination of a person, means mounted on the intermediate part of the support and adapted for measuring the shoulder height of a person, and means mounted upon the lower part of this support for measuring or indicating the depth of. the indentation or small part of the back of a person at or adjacent to the waist-line.

The main support or frame may be variously organized but in the preferred construction the same has the general form of a bar which is adapted to be placed vertically in rear of the back of the person which is being measured, and the same preferably comprises an upper section I 0, an intermediate section II, and a lower section l2, all of which are preferably made in the form of strips of light material such as vulcanite, hard rubber or the like, but if desired the same may be made of metal such as aluminum.

For the purpose of enabling this supporting bar to be folded and thus shorten the same so that it is more compact for storing purposes or for more conveniently shipping the same, the upper end of the intermediate section is connected with the lower end of. the upper section by means of a pivot 13 having the form of a hinge, the axis of which is arranged horizontally and transversely so that the lower supporting bar section H can either be moved into a position in which the same projects downwardly from the upper section, as shown by full lines in Figs. 1, 2 and 4, or the same can be swung rearwardly and upwardly against the rear side of the upper bar section I and parallel therewith, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 2.

The lower section I2 is also pivotally connected at its upper end with the lower end of the intermediate section by means of a pivot pin l4 whose axis is arranged horizontally and lengthwise whereby the lower section may be turned into a position in which the same projects downwardly from the intermediate section, as shown by full lines in Figs. 1, 2 and 4, or the same may be turned upwardly in rear of the intermediate section and then moved bodily with the latter toward the rear side of. the upper bar section and parallel therewith, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 2, and thus effect a substantial shortening of the apparatus as a whole, for the purpose above stated.

When in use the supporting bar is preferably suspended in its operative position from the rear central part of the neck band or collar l of the garment which is worn by the person being measured, and this is accomplished in the present case by means of a flexible band I 6 of metal or similar material arranged in front of the upper supporting bar section II] and rigidly connected therewith at its lower end by means of rivets H or the like, while the upper end of. this band is provided with a hook l8 which engages over the neck band or collar of the person's garment.

This flexible band I6 is also utilized for measuring the stoop or inclination of the person being measured by applying this band to the back of this person and conforming the same to the contour thereof, and then measuring the distance between the upper end of the main supporting bar and the upper end of this band, while the supporting bar is in a vertical position. The preferred means for taking this particular measurement which are shown in the drawings comprise a stoop gage arm I9 having preferably the form of a flat curved strip which is pivotally connected at its front end with the upper end of the flexible band I6 by means of a pivot 20, while its rear end passes through an opening 2I in the upper part of the upper bar section I0, and clamping means whereby the rear part of the stoop gage arm I9 and the upper part of the supporting bar section I 0 may be secured together after the flexible band I6 has been properly applied to the back of the person for determining the stoop or inclination thereof. The extent of this stoop or inclination may be readily determined by graduating one or both sides of the gage bar I9 with suitable lines or figures, as indicated at 22, and reading off these graduations adjacent to the inner side of the supporting bar section Ill.

The clamping means for holding the gage arm I9 and the supporting bar section III against movement relatively to each other preferably comprise two clamping lugs 23 mounted on the rear side of the bar section In on opposite sides of the slot or opening 2I and receiving the rear part of the gage arm I9 between the same, and a clamping bolt 24 connecting the clamping lugs 23 above the gage arm I 9 and adapted, when tightened, to grip this arm and hold the same in position relative to the bar section II] in order to permit of a careful reading of the measuring scale or graduations on said arm for use in ultimately drafting and cutting a garment for the person being measured.

For the purpose of enabling the gage arm I 9, flexible band I6 and the supporting bar to be folded compactly for storage and transportation, the upper section I0 of this bar is provided with a vertical slot 25 below the slot or opening 2|, which slot 25 is adapted to receive the gage arm I9 by first withdrawing the latter from the opening 2I, then folding the same to- .ward the band I6 and then moving this arm and band toward the bar section In so that the gage arm I9 enters the slot 25, as shown by dotted lines in Figs. 2 and 4. In this position of the parts the same are folded very compactly and can therefore be stowed in a small space and also transported more readily.

In order to obtain an absolutely accurate measurement of a person for use in preparing a garment it is necessary to maintain the upright supporting bar or frame in a perfectly vertical position, both lengthwise and crosswise of the person whose measurement is being taken, and thereby enable the means which are mounted on this bar to be utilized for ascertaining the required measurements with absolute accuracy.

To accomplish this purpose the supporting bar is provided with two liquid level indicators or gages, one of which, indicated generally by the numeral 26, permits of accurately placing the main supporting bar in a vertical position fore and aft of the body of the person being measured, and another liquid level indicator designated by the numeral 21, permits the main supporting bar to be accurately placed in a vertical position crosswise of the body of said person. Each of monly used in ordinarly plumbs and levels, and consists of a glass tube containing a liquid which, upon being tilted in one direction or the other, causes an air bubble to move back and forth lengthwise in the upper part of the tube. Each of these tubes is so constructed that the air bubble therein is arranged in the central upper part of the respective tube when the part which carries the tube is arranged in an upright position.

The tube of the upper indicator 2B in the pres ent case is mounted on the upper part of the main supporting bar in a longitudinal horizontal position by means of two lips 28 which are bent downwardly and inwardly from one of the clamping lugs 23 and around opposite ends of the tube of the indicator 26 so as to leave the upper central part of this tube uncovered, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 4; and the tube of the lower indicator 21 is supported in a horizontal transverse position on the upper part of the main supporting bar by means of two lips 29 bent rearwardly and upwardly around opposite ends of the tube 21 so as to expose the upper central part of this tube, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 4.

These means for mounting the indicator tubes on the main supporting bar are very simple and also bring the same relatively close together so that the operator may simultaneously observe the indicator bubbles in both of these tubes by one glance and thus facilitate the operation of properly placing the instrument on the person being measured.

The means whereby the shoulder height of a person is measured and also the difference between the height of one shoulder and another is determined, are preferably constructed as follows:-

The numeral 39 represents two slides which are vertically movable on opposite longitudinal edge portions of the upper supporting bar section ID, each of these slides being preferably constructed in the form of a loop which embraces one of the members or branches of this bar In between its longitudinal slot 25 and one of its longitudinal I and pivotally connected with the hinge eyes 3| by means of a pivot 33 having the form of a rivet, the axis of which is arranged horizontally and lengthwise relative to the person being measured.

On the outer end of each of the cross bars is mounted a slide 34 which is movable horizontally and transversely on this bar relative to the person being measured. Each of these outer slides 34 is preferably constructed of sheet metal in the form of a loop which embraces the respective cross bar 32, and at its upper end this slide is provided with two forwardly projecting hinge eyes 35 which are pivotally connected with the rear end of a shoulder height gage arm 36 by means of a vertical pivot 31.

In the use of this portion of the apparatus each of the inner slides 38 is moved up or down on the main supporting bar, each outer slide 34 is moved horizontally and transversely on a cross bar 32, and each shoulder height gage arm 36 is turned horizontally on the outer slide 34 the requisite extent for bringing the front end of the respective gage arm 36 into engagement with the top of one of the shoulders of the person being measured. The position of these parts is now noted and utilized during the subsequent operation of preparing the draft of the garment and cutting the cloth accordingly.

Ihe vertical position of the height of each shoulder is indicated by a vertical scale or row of graduations 38 formed on the vertical bar member at one of the longitudinal edges of the supporting bar, upon which the respective slide 30 moves vertically, the distance of the point of the shoulder height from the center of the body is indicated by a scale or longitudinal row of graduations 39 formed on the respective cross bar 32 so that the position of the outer slide 34 relative to this scale may be read, and the fore and aft position of the shoulder point or top is indicated by means of a scale or row of graduations 40 which are formed on the respective gage arm 36 and enables the operator to determine the distance fore and aft from the cross bar 32 and. supportingbar I0 to the place where the front part of the shoulder height gage arm rests upon the shoulder of the person being measured.

The inner slide 30, the outer slide 34 and the gage arm 36 are preferably held frictionally in their adjusted position by detent means which may be variously constructed. In the preferred construction, however, each of the inner slides 33 is frictionally held in position by means of a curved spring 4| interposed between the inner part of each slide 30 and the adjacent longitudinal edge portion of the supporting bar sec tion ID, as shown in Fig. 4.

Each of the outer slides 34 is also held frictionally in position by means of a curved detent spring 42 interposed between the lower part of each of these slides and the lower edge of the respective cross bar 32, as shown on the right hand side of Fig. 4.

Each of the shoulder height gage arms 40 is frictionally held in position by means of a spring washer 43 interposed between the upper side of the respective gage arm and the head of the pivot 31, as best shown at the right of Fig. 4.

After both of the shoulder height gage arms 36 have been properly fitted to the upper side of both shoulders the operator is able to observe whether the two shoulders are on a level or whether one shoulder is higher than the other, which difference is indicated by the relative position of the two inner slides 30 on the upper section I0 of the supporting bar, said slides being directly opposite each other when the shoulders are even, as shown in Fig. l, but if the shoulders are uneven, that isone high and the other low as shown in Fig. 4, then one of these slides will be higher than the other.

Each of the cross bars 32 is capable of swinging from a horizontal operative position into a vertical folded position parallel with the adjacent part of the supporting bar, and each of the gage arms 36 is adapted to be swung inwardly into a folded position relative to its companion cross bar 32, and then moved upwardly with the latter into a vertical position adjacent to the respective side of the supporting bar section l0 and parallel therewith, as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 4, for the purpose of folding the apparatus into compact form for greater convenience in storing and transporting the same.

Means are provided for preventing each of the cross bars 32 from swinging downwardly from a horizontal position about its pivot 33, this being preferably accomplished by means of a stop shoulder 44 formed on the inner lower part of each cross bar 32 and adapted to engage the adjacent vertical edge of the upper supporting bar section ID, as shown in Fig. 4

Each of the outer slides 34 is prevented from being wholly withdrawn from the respective cross bar 32 by providing the latter with a stop 45 at the outer end thereof, so that this stop is engaged by the slide 34 before the latter can A escape from this cross bar.

The means whereby the depth of the identation or small of the back or waist length is measured are preferably constructed as follows:-

The numeral 46 represents a vertical longitudinal slot formed on the main supporting bar about midway of its height and preferably in the intermediate section II thereof, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4. Upon this section of the main supporting bar is mounted a slide 41 which is vertically movable thereon and which preferably is constructed of sheet metal so as to provide two side walls 48 which are connected at their front ends by means of a wall 49, while the rear ends of these side walls are provided with pairs of laterally projecting guide flanges or lips 50 whereby these walls are slidably guided on the opposing longitudinal edges of the bar section II formed by the slot 46 therein.

The numeral 5| represents a back depth gage bar or arm which in its normal operative position is arranged beween the two side walls of the slide 41 and projects horizontally and lengthwise through the front wall thereof, as well as through the vertical slot 46 of the gage bar section H, and is provided at its front end with a bearing head 52 which is adapted to engage with the innermost part of the indentation or the small part ofthe back from the front end of the head 52 to the upright supporting bar. This is indicated by a scale or row of graduations 53 on the side of the depth gage bar or arm 5! which may be read relative to the supporting bar section H so that by moving this depth gage bar 5| horizontally forward or backward on this supporting bar until the head 52 engages the bottom of the indentation at the back of the person being measured, and also raising and lowering the slide 41 with reference to a scale or row of graduations 54 on the supporting bar section II, the operator can accurately determine the locat on and depth of this indentation or small of the back and then govern his lay-out and cutting of the garment accordingly.

Means are provided whereby this depth gage bar 5! may be folded and shifted from an operative position at right angles to the main supporting bar to a position parallel thereto for the purpose of rendering the apparatus more compact, so that the same may be stored and shipped more conveniently. The preferred means for this purpose, shown in the drawings, are constructed as follows:-

The numeral 55 represents a pivot pin arranged transversely on the outer or rear end of the depth gage bar 5| and adapted to move back and forth through an enlargement 56 which is formed in the slot 46 of the bar H, preferably adjacent to the upper end thereof. This pivot pin 55 is also adapted to move lengthwise in longitudinal horizontal slots 51 formed in the walls 48 of the slide 4'! and also to turn therein when folding and unfolding the depth gage bar relative to the adjacent part of the main supporting bar.

When the apparatus is in use the depth gage bar 5| is in a horizontal position, its bearing head 52 is arranged on the front side of the supporting oar section H, and the pivot pin 55 is arranged in rear of this bar section, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 5, and at this time this gage bar is yieldingly held in a horizontal position by spring means consisting preferably of two spring detents or jaws 58 formed on the lower part of the front ends of the side walls of the slide 41, and engaging with the lower edge of this gage bar, as best shown in Figs. 5 and 6, thereby yieldingly retaining this gage bar in its operative horizontal position in which it can slide horizontally back and forth in the slide 47 and also move vertically therewith on the adjacent supporting bar section H.

In addition to the spring jaws 58 the gage bar 5| is further held in its horizontal position within the slide 4'? by means of upwardly projecting shoulders 65 struck inwardly from the lower outer parts of the walls 48 of the slide All and engaging with the adjacent portion of the lower edge of the gage bar 5i, as shown in Figs. 5 and 7.

When it is desired to fold the depth gage bar 5| relative to the main supporting bar, then the depth gage bar and the slide i! are moved high enough to bring the pivot pin 55 in line with the enlargement 56 of the slot 48, and at this time the gage bar 5| may be drawn forwardly so that its pivot pin 55 passes through the enlargement 56 of the gage bar section H, and into the horizontal slots 5'! in the side walls of the slide 41, as shown in Fig. 7.

Upon continuing the forward movement of the gage bar 5i so that the pivot pin 55 is wholly in front of the supporting bar II and within the front part of the slots 51, and the rear or outer end of the gage bar has also cleared the shoulders 60, then the gage bar 5! may be swung downwardly with sufficient pressure to overcome the resistance of the detent springs 58 and into a vertical position on the front side of the supporting bar section I I, and substantially parallel therewith, as shown by dotted lines in the lower part of Fig. 2.

While the gage bar 5! is in this folded position with reference to the supporting bar section l these two members may be swung rearwardly and upwardly in unison and into a position in rear of the upper supporting bar section l0 and parallel therewith, as shown by dotted lines in the central part of Fig. 2, thereby folding the respective parts of the apparatus into a compact arrangement which can be readily stored and shipped in a relatively small space.

In order to prevent easy displacement of the depth gage bar 5| but hold the same yieldingly in place while measurement of a person is taking place, spring detent means are provided which preferably consist of a spring finger 59 projecting rearwardly from the front wall 49 of the slide 41 and engaging with the upper edge of the gage bar 5i, as shown in Fig. 5, whereby this bar is rel ably held in place while the apparatus is in use. but can be readily shifted intentienally when this is necessary.

The various parts of this apparatus can be manufactured at comparatively low cost from materials which are readily available in the market, and the same can be easily assembled and also folded compactly. Moreover, the various parts of this apparatus can be readily adjusted so as to adapt the same to the form of a person for obtaining the required measurements which are necessary to produce a good-fitting suit without requiring any try-ens as is the case in the art of tailoring now commonly practiced.

I claim as my invention:

1. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar adapted to be arranged vertically in rear of the back of a person being measured, a flexible band adapted to follow the stoop or incline of the upper part of said back, and connected at its lower end with said bar and adapted to be connected at its upper end with the neck band of the garment, means for measuring the distance between the upper ends of said bar and band comprising a stoop gage arm connected at its front end with the upper part of said band, two clamping lugs arranged on said bar and receiving the rear part of said gage arm between them, and a clamping screw connecting said lugs, and means for leveling said bar fore and aft and sidewise including a horizontal lower liquid gage secured transversely to the lower parts of said lugs, and an upper horizontal liquid gage secured lengthwise to the upper part of one of said lugs.

2. A garment measuring device including a main upright supporting bar adapted to be placed against the back of a person being measured below its upper end and provided with a longitudinal slot, a flexible band adapted to be applied to the curved part of the back and having its lower end connected with said bar and adapted to be connected at its upper end with the neck band of the garment, and a gage arm pivotally connected at its front end on the upper part of said band and slidable with its rear end through the upper part of said bar and adapted to be folded relatively to said band and to be received in said slot of the bar.

3. A garment measuring device including an upright main supporting bar provided with a vertical slot forming upright gage sections on opposite sides of said slot, loop shaped slides movable vertically independently of each other on said gage sections and each embracing one of said gage sections between said slot and one longitudinal edge of said bar, cross bars mounted at their inner ends on said slides, and shoulder height gage arms mounted on the outer ends of said cross bars and adapted to engage the upper sides of the shoulders of the person being measured.

4. A garment measuring device including an upright main supporting bar provided with a vertical slot forming upright gage sections on opposite sides of said slot, slides movable vertically independently of each other on said gage sections, cross bars pivoted at their inner ends on said slides for swinging vertically relatively thereto, outer slides mounted on said cross bars and movable horizontally and transversely thereon, and shoulder height gage arms pivoted on said outer slides.

5. A garment measuring device including an upright main supporting bar provided with a vertical slot forming upright gage sections on opposite sides of said slot, slides movable verti cally independently of each other on said gage sections, cross bars pivoted at their inner ends on said slides for swinging vertically relatively thereto, outer slides mounted on said cross bars and movable horizontally and transversely thereon, and shoulder height gage arms pivoted on said outer slides, said cross bars being foldable into a position parallel to said main supporting bar and said shoulder height arms being foldable into a position parallel with said main and cross bars.

6. A garment measuring device including a main upright supporting bar adapted to be placed in rear of a person being measured, and means for indicating the depth of the back indentation at the Waist line, comprising a back depth gage bar adapted to engage its front end with the bottom of said indentation, and having its rear part mounted on said main bar so as to be capable of vertical and also horizontal longitudinal movement relatively thereto, and also adapted to be folded into a position parallel with said main bar.

7. A garment measuring device including a main upright supporting bar adapmd to be placed in rear of a person being measured, and means for indicating the depth of the back indentation at the waist line, including a depth slide movable vertically on said bar, and a depth bar mounted on said slide and adapted to be arranged either horizontally or vertically relatively thereto.

8. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar adapted to be placed upright against the back of the person being measured and provided with a vertical slot, a slide movable vertically in said slot, and a back depth gage arm movable lengthwise on said slide and also capable of swinging thereon.

9. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar adapted to be placed upright against the back of the person being measured and provided with a vertical slot, and also with an enlargement of said slot at one part thereof, a slide movable lengthwise in said slot and having a horizontal slot adapted to be placed in or out of register with said enlargement upon movement of said slide, and a depth gage arm slidable horizontally on said slide and provided with a pin which pivotally connects said arm and slide and which is movable through said enlargement and also movable in the slot of said slide for folding and unfolding the main bar and depth gage relatively to one another.

10. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar adapted to be placed upright against the back of the person being measured and provided with a vertical slot, and also with an enlargement of said slot at one part thereof, a slide movable lengthwise in said slot and having a horizontal slot adapted to be placed in or out of register with said enlargement upon movement of said slide, and a depth gage arm slidable horizontally on said slide and provided with a pin which pivotally connects said arm and slide and which is movable through said enlargement and also movable inthe slot of said slide for folding and unfolding the main bar and depth gage relatively to one another, and a catch mounted on said slide and adapted to engage said depth gage arm for holding the same in a horizontal position.

11. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar composed of a plurality of sections adapted to be placed vertically in rear of the back of the person being measured and capable of being folded relatively to one another, means mounted on the upper section of said bar for indicating the angle of stoop and the height of shoulders, and means mounted on a lower section of said bar for indicating the depth of the back indentation.

12. A garment measuring device including a main supporting bar adapted to be placed vertically in rear of the person being measured, and having upper, intermediate and lower sections, means mounted on the upper bar section for indicating the angle of stoop and the height of shoulders, and means mounted on said intermediate section for indicating the depth of the back indentation, said intermediate bar section being connected by a horizontal transverse pivot with said upper bar section, and said lower bar section being connected by a horizontal longitudinal pivot with said intermediate bar section.

13. A garment measuring device including an upright supporting bar, a slide movable vertically on said bar, a depth gage arm slidable horizontally and pivoted to swing vertically on said slide, and yielding detent means for holding the arm in a horizontal position.

14. A garment measuring device including .an. upright supporting bar, a slide movable vertically on said bar, a depth gage .arm slidable horizontally and pivoted to swing vertically on said slide, yielding detent means for holding the arm in a horizontal position, and detent means for yieldingly holding said arm against horizontal movement.

15. A garment measuring device including an upright supporting bar, a slide movable vertically on said bar, a depth gage arm slidable horizontally .and pivoted toswing vertically on said slide, yielding detent means for holding the arm in a horizontal position, and a shoulder arranged on the lower part of said slide and engaging with the underside of said arm.

MORRIS W. GREENBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2703931 *Jan 15, 1954Mar 15, 1955Collins Flossie LDressmakers' and tailors' marker
US2810964 *Jul 12, 1955Oct 29, 1957Engelbert Richard MDevice for determining the positions of the ilii in relation to each other
US2818648 *Apr 6, 1956Jan 7, 1958August Jochheim Hans RudolfPosture measuring device
US3066419 *Jun 3, 1958Dec 4, 1962King Bertell WBarge measuring instrument
US3632484 *Jan 27, 1970Jan 4, 1972Richards Robert DoughtyElectrolytic facsimile-recording process
US6931747 *Dec 2, 2003Aug 23, 2005Fernando RegoTailoring guide system
US7810169 *Sep 22, 2006Oct 12, 2010Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Garment and measuring scale combination
WO2007142504A1 *Jun 9, 2006Dec 13, 2007Haro Jose Luis ArriagaInstrument for measuring scoliosis in humans
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/2.00R
International ClassificationA41H1/02, A41H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H1/02
European ClassificationA41H1/02