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Publication numberUS2064309 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1936
Filing dateFeb 14, 1936
Priority dateFeb 14, 1936
Publication numberUS 2064309 A, US 2064309A, US-A-2064309, US2064309 A, US2064309A
InventorsRaymond Lohr
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy vehicle
US 2064309 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. LOHR TOY VEHICLE I Filed Feb. 14, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Roamoncl Lohr I BY I ATTORN EYS Dec. 15, 1936. LOHR 2,064,309

' TOY VEHICLE Filed Feb. 14, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR I Rogmond Lohr 2 ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 15, less stares Zfitiditt FATEN? @FFEQE TOY VEHICLE Raymond Lohr, Erie, Pa.,

assignor to Louis Application February 14, 1936, Serial No. 63,880

' 18 Claims. (Cl. 46-407) This invention relates to toy vehicles, and more particularly to a novel form of toy which may be most briefly characterized as a bouncing toy vehicle.

The primary object of my invention is to gen erally improve toy vehicles. A more particular object resides in the provision of an unusual form of. toy vehicle suitable for use indoors or outdoors and by children of all ages. In accordance with features and objects of the present invention, the toy when used indoors is incapable of scratching the floor or furniture; it may be used on a table and rolled off the table to the floor; it is practically indestructible regardless of abuse; and it may be dropped and bounced like a rubber ball and may be turned over. In accordance with further features and objects of my invention, the toy is equally advantageously usable out of doors: it may be pulled along the ground by a child running at full speed; it continues in proper operation even if it is jolted, bounced, or turned turtle; and it may be used at the beach in soft sand, or on dirt or mud, as well as on city sidewalks.

A further object of my invention is to provide the toy with a simulated driver which appears in driving position regardless of which side of the toy is turned uppermost. ject of my invention resides in the provision of spring motor driving mechanism for use in a bouncing toy of the character here disclosed, and more particularly in the provision of automatic stop mechanism for stopping the motor against free unwinding when the vehicle is removed from or bounces away from its running surface.

To the accomplishment of the. foregoing and other objects which will hereinafter appear, my

invention consists in the toy vehicle elements and their relation one to the other, as hereinafter are more particularly described in the specification and sought to be defined in the claims. The specification is accompanied by drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a toy embodying features of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is a rear end elevation thereof;

Fig. 4 is a section through and is explanatory of the construction of the wheels of the vehicle;

Fig. 5 illustrates one of the many possibilities of the toy in operation;

Fig. 6 is a partially sectioned side elevation of a modification arranged for self-propulsion;

Fig. '7 is a partially sectioned plan view thereof; and

Still another ob- Fig. 8 is a partially sectioned side elevation of a modified form of the invention embodying a movable duplex simulated driver and also embodying bell ringing mechanism.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1, 2, and 3 thereof, the vehicle toy comprises a. compact vehicle body B provided with well-rounded and preferably soft and resilient wheels W. The diameter and location of thewheels are such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body B are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, aswill be particularly evident on inspection of Fig. 2. Moreover, the, ends of the Wheel axles are safely housed well inside the side faces of the wheels, as will be evident from inspection of Fig. 3. The wheels are preferably made of soft sponge rubber and simulate enormously, oversized balloon or doughnut tires. The body B is preferably made symmetrical with respect to its longitudinal axis, so that there is no appreciable change in appearance of the toy if it is inverted, the axles preferably being located midway between the top and bottom of the toy body, as is clearly brought out in Figs. 2 and 3.

With this construction, it will be evident that the toy possesses a striking and novel appearance; that it is capable of running on either side; that it cannot injure furniture because the soft sponge rubber wheels act as bumpers for the front and rear ends of the toy and for all sides of the toy including the outside faces at the ends of the axles; and that the toy, because of its simplicity and because of the manner in which it is shielded at every point by the soft resilient wheels or tires, is practically unbreakable.

Considering the construction of the toy in greater detail, the body B is preferably pressed out of heavy-gauge sheet metal and in the present case simulates the body of a racing automobile. The body is given a compact cigar-like configuration and therefore possesses considerable inherent structural strength and rigidity.

The construction of the wheels is best brought out in Fig. 4. I prefer to employ a soft highly porous sponge rubber body l2, through the center of which is passed the end portion I4 of an axle it. The sides of the sponge rubber body l2 are compressed together by inner and outer washers l8 and 2t], washer l3 being slipped over axle i lahead of the rubber body to a suitable abutment or shoulder is, and Washer 20 then being added and forced toward washer l8 until the end of the axle is exposed, whereupon the I end is riveted over the washer, as is indicated side.

at 22. While it is not essential to do so, I prefer to use an ordinary spherical sponge rubber ball, indicated by the broken line 24, because the sponge rubber in this form is standardized and obtainable at low cost, and, more importantly, because I find that a wheel of good appearance and operating characteristics may be thus obtained. The opposite faces of the ball are compressed inwardly to a substantial extent, as is readily apparent from comparison of the solid and broken outlines superimposed in Fig. 4. Because of the importance of shielding the axle end 22 well within the protective side of the wheel, I find it preferable to make the Washer 29 smaller in diameter than the washer 3, for Washer 213 is then embedded to a greater depth than washer i8, and the resulting difierence in location is retained throughout the life of the toy.

The axles it are inserted in and located on the body B in any desired manner. In the present case the axles have shoulders or keys 30 swaged outwardly at opposite sides of the body, as is best shown in Figs. 1 and 3. These keys are so spaced as to permit the axle to turn freely in the body, yet to prevent the axle from shifting axially. The body is thereby centered symmetrically between the wheels.

The toy illustrated in Fig. l is of the motorless or pull type. A small bail 40 is struck outwardly at the center of the forward end 42 of the body and is adapted to receive one end of a pull cord 44. It will be understood that the child holds the other end of the cord and pulls the toy along behind him; and one advantage of the present toy is that, unlike ordinary vehicle toys, it may be pulled along at full running speed, for the toy bounces without injury and it may turn turtle for it runs equally well on either I have found that the amusement and play value of the toy may be increased by making the pull cord it elastic. A length or strand of ordinary rubber is suitable. This not only provides flexibility in operation as the toy encounters bumps and like obstacles, but also may be intentionally employed to cause the toy to run backward and forward while the child remains at one point, and, by getting up sufficient speed, the toy may be made to skid, as when cracking the whip, or may be made to turn somersault at the end of each reciprocation.

The appearance of the toy may, if desired, be improved by the addition of a simulated driver. In the present case the head of the driver is indicated at to and forms part of a figure the lower portion 48 of which is purposely weighted. The figure is pivoted on a pin 50 running transversely through the body. The top and bottom walls of the body are cut away to form similar simulated driving cockpits 52. The figure is so dimensioned as to be rotatable within the body about pintle 50. It always assumes an upright position because of the weighted bottom 48. The head 48 therefore appears at the top, regardless of which side of the toy is turned uppermost. Incidentally, the movement or oscillation of the head during operation of the vehicle, is effective to increase the realism of the toy even when the toy is not upset.

Referring now to Figs. 6 and '7, I show a toy vehicle generally similar to that previously described, but differing mainly in being provided with spring motor driving mechanism for selfpropulsion of the toy. At the outset, a minor variation in construction may be mentioned,

namely, the manner in which the wheels and axles are located with respect to the body. In the present case, spacer tubes 56 are employed, these tubes being slipped over the axle between the wheels and the body and being so dimensioned as to fill up the space therebetween, thus preventing axial movement of the wheels with respect to the body. As before, a free or running fit is provided, the axles being rotatable in the body.

Coming now to the motor, that here illustrated comprises a winding stem Ell journaled in the side walls 62 of the body B and carrying a main spring 64 the outer end of which is connected to the body at 5%, and the inner end of which is secured to the winding stem. The drive of the spring is transmitted through appropriate conventional ratchet mechanism 53 (Fig. 6) to a gear 10 forming a part of a step-up gear train leading to the forward axle H. Specifically, gear l8 meshes with a pinion i2 fixedly related to a gear 14 meshing with a pinion l6 fixedly related to a gear 78 meshing with a pinion 89 mounted directly on the aforesaid axle H. One end of winding stem 69 is bent to form a key 82, and it will be understood that by winding the key and then releasing the vehicle, it is propelled by the motor. The vehicle runs in a forward direction when running on one side, but runs in a rearward direction when turned turtle. This is not a serious objection, and, if anything, increases the amusement obtained when operating the toy. Moreover, the racer type body here used does not greatly differ at its forward and rear ends, and, in fact, the ends may be made alike, that is, the body may, if desired, be made symmetrical with respect to its transverse axis as well as with respect to a longitudinal axis as is now the case.

Furthermore, when the toy is provided with a rotatable figure, such as the figure 46 previously described (and which has been omitted in Figs. 6 and '7, for simplicity), the change in direction of movement of the vehicle is appropriate and corresponds to a change in the direction in which the head of the figure faces when the toy is inverted. In other words, the figure and motor are so related that the toy in either case runs in the direction in which the figure faces.

It has previously been mentioned that the toy may be bounced much like the rubber balls from which it is largely made. Referring to Fig. 5, for example, I show how the toy may be run on a table 84 without worry or fear, because on falling from the edge of the table, the toy is uninjured and simply bounces to running position, as is indicated by the successive positions 86, 88, and 90. The result is highly pleasing to children, most of whom cherish a secret desire to run a toy vehicle over a table edge or precipice. It should be noted that the toy always lands on four wheels after being bounced, this being due to the relatively rounded configuration at the outside of the wheels and the substantial width of the toy relative to its height, thus making it difficult for the toy to come to rest on its side.

When using the motor-driven form of toy shown in Figs. 6 and 7 in the manner described in Fig. 5 or any equivalent manner, difiiculty arises because of the tendency of the spring motor to freely unwind when the wheels are free of the running surface. To overcome this difficulty, I provide top and bottom feeler or stop members 92 and $5 (Figs. 6 and 7) so arranged as to determine whether the vehicle is resting on a running surface, and, if so, to release the motor for unwinding. When the toy bounces or is otherwise removed from a running surface, the bottom feeler moves downwardly and the motor is locked against further rotation until the feeler is again moved upwardly by the running surface.

Considering the arrangement in greater detail, feelers 92 and Si l are formed at the opposite ends of a single piece of rod the center portion 96 of which extends transversely through and is journaled in the body B. Shaft 96 carries an arm 98 to which is pivotally connected the rear end of a detent strip Hill. This strip is twisted to lie in a vertical plane at its rear portion, but to lie in a horizontal plane at its forward end or detent portion Hi2. Part W2 is disposed immediately adjacent one of the gears of the gear train, in this case gear 78. The strip is guided by resting on the spindle Hi l of pinion l2 and gear M. A light coiled spring M35 is tensioned between strip H10 and a suitable hook or lug )8 on the body. The spring is disposed at an angle so as to normally tend to move detent Hi2 into engagement with the teeth of gear '68. However, when the toy rests on a suitable running surface, here indicated by the line Bill, the bottom feeler, in this case feeler 92, is moved upwardly, thus oscillating arm 98 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 6, and so moving detent H32 away from gear l8, as shown in Figs. 6 and 7. It will be understood that when the toy is inverted, the feeler B l functions instead of the feeler 92. It will also be understood that the feelers 92 and 9d are made relatively rounded in configuration and are disposed at a long slope or angle in order not to impede the movement of the toy on the running surface. As shown in Fig. 6, the toy runs in a rearward direction, that is, toward the right as viewed in the drawings. When the toy is inverted. it runs in a forward direction. that is, toward the left, and at that time feeler 94 is disposed in a rearward direction such as will not impede movement of the toy, just as feeler 92 is disposed in a direction such as not to impede movement of the toy toward the right as viewed in the drawings.

Another form of my invention is shown in Fig. 8. The body, wheels, and axles may be constructed substantially as previously described. The construction of the simulated driver is modihowever. with a view to making the driver face forward even when the toy is inverted. Cons dered in simp est form, this may be done by providing two heads, one at the top. and the other at the bottom of the toy. Only the upper head is visible, because the lower head is near the running surface and is concealed by the toy structure.

The arrangement may be elaborated, however, w th a view to making it possible to project the drivers head out of the toy body. It will be recollected that the pivoted driver in Fig. l is disposed within the toy body, and this is done not only to make rotation of the driver possible, but also to maintain the fundamental condition sought in the present toy, in accordance with which all parts of the toy are shielded within the protective rubber wheels. This protects the toy against injury and protects furniture and the like against scratching.

These objectives are retained in the arrangement of Fig. 8 in accordance with which the top and bottom heads H2 and lid are preferably formed of material of light weight, for example, outwardly convexed sheet celluloid. The combined figure is mounted on one end of an arm i l 6 pivoted on a transverse support or shaft H8. Arm i it is extended beyond shaft i8 and carries a weight [29 which far overloalances heads H2 and lid. The weight in may, if desired, be provided with bumpers I22 which limit its movement and insure silent operation. It will be apparent from inspection of Fig. 8, that the upper head, in this case head H2, is moved out of the cockpit by the descent of weight I 26, and that at the same time the bottom head l M is moved to a safe position well within the toy body B. When the toy is turned over, weight lZd immediately changes position and promptly draws head M2 to a protected position within the toy body, while head I M is moved upwardly to driving position.

It will be understood that the weighted retractible head arrangement may be used, if desired, with only a single head, and also that the double head arrangement may be employed with the heads fixed in stationary position within the cockpits. These features may be used alone as well as in combination as specifically exemplified in Fi 8.

The arrangement of Fig. 8 also includes bell ringing mechanism which functions as the toy is drawn along by its pull cord or rubber strand l2d. This bell ringing mechanism is so arranged as to function equally well, regardless of which side of the toy is uppermost. Specifically, the forward axle i 26 carries a gear I23 which meshes with a pinion 83% mounted on a shaft i232. Shaft H32 carries a disc i3 8 provided with ring-like bell clapper weights E36, said weights being carried on pins H38 projecting sidewardly from disc 83 i. The ends of pins E33 are preferably headed sufficiently to hold the weights against axial movement, but the weights are freely movable in a radial direction. A bell gong its is mounted close to disc i3 5 by means of a suitable post or support Hi2. It will be understood that on rotation of disc Hi l, the bell clapper weights I36 fly outwardly under centrifugal force and thereupon reach and strike bell its as they move past the same.

It is believed that the mode of constructing and using, as well as the many advantages of my improved vehicle toy, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. The toy is striking and attractive in appearance, and is practically indestructible in construction and use. It may be rolled off a table or precipice without injury, and instead simply bounces and regains running position. It may be run with either side up. It cannot scratch or injure floors, table tops, furniture legs, or the like, because all of the metal parts of the toy are made compact and are housed safely within the peripheries of the wheels. Not only the top and bottom surfaces but the front and rear ends and the side surfaces and even the axle ends, are all protectively carried well within the soft bumper or shielding surfaces provided by the exaggeratedly oversize balloon-like tires. The toy may be pulled along at full running speed without injury, because it simply bounces or turns turtle, in accordance with the condition of the road surface. Because of the large surface area of the soft rubber tires relative to the small size of the toy body, the toy forms an excellent beach toy which may be used by children in soft sand; and, in fact, I have constructed models of this toy which float even when using a metallic body, this being due to the exceedingly light and porous nature of the rubber wheels. The toy may be nus-handled and practically thrown around without injury to itself or its surroundings.

The toy may be provided with a simulated driver or like figure which turns right-side-up even when the toy is overturned, and the figure may, if desired, be so arranged as to project out of the top of the toy during operation, yet to move back within the toy body when the toy is inverted. The vehicle may be motor-propelled, and if propelled by a spring motor, special mechanism may be included to automatically lock the motor against unwinding when the vehicle is lifted or bounces away from its running surface. This mechanism functions regardless of which side of the toy is uppermost. Vfhen the toy is operated as a pull toy, the cord connected thereto is preferably made of rubber, thus improving the operating characteristic of the toy when drawn along at considerable speed on a running surf-ace. Moreover, the elastic strand may be used to pull the toy to and fro at high speed, and to cause the same to skid sharply about or to turn somersault, all without danger of injuring the toy.

it will be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in several preferred forms, many changes and modifications may be made in the structures disclosed, without departing from the spirit of the invention, defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A toy vehicle comprising a compact slender vehicle body resembling a racing automobile, said body being symmetrical with respect to its longitudinal axis, axles projecting sidewardly for a substantial distance near the front and rear ends thereof midway between the top and bottom of the vehicle body, and relatively large-diameter wheels made wholly of soft rubber mounted at the ends of said axles, said wheels resembling enormously oversize inflated balloon or airplane tires and being so dimensioned and located with respect to the body that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are all located within planes connectthe peripheries of the wheels.

2. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, axles projecting from the front and rear ends of the body, and relatively large soft wheels mounted on said axles, all parts of the body and also the ends of the axles being disposed well inside the outer faces of the wheels.

3. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body simulating an automobile racer, axles projecting from the front and rear ends of the body, and relatively large soft rubber wheels mounted on said axles, all parts of the body and also the ends of the axles being disposed well inside the outer faces of the wheels.

4. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, and large soft wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and the shape and mounting of the wheels and the axles being such that the ends of the axles are housed well inside the outside faces of the wheels.

5. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, and large soft wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and the shape and mounting of the wheels and the axles being such that the ends of the axles are housed well inside the outside faces of the wheels.

6. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact elongated vehicle body resembling a racing automobile, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof midway between the top and bottom thereof, and large soft rubber wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said Wheels with respect to the body being such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and the shape and mounting of the Wheels on the axles being such that the ends of the axles are housed well inside the outside faces of the wheels.

'7. A toy vehiclewheel comprising a circular body of soft sponge rubber having an axle forced diametrically therethrough, and circular metal washers disposed on said axle at the inside and outside faces of the wheel, said washers being spaced apart along the axle a distance less than the axial dimension of the circular body of sponge rubber, said washers holding said body under sufficient compression to give the wheels the desired shape.

8. A toy vehicle comprising a soft sponge rubber ball having an axle forced diametrically therethrough, and circular metal washers disposed on said axle at the inside and outside faces of the wheel, said washers being spaced apart a distance substantially less than the diameter of the ball, said washers holding the rubber therebetween under sufficient compression to give the wheels the desired shape and to safely house the end of the axle within the outside face of the wheel.

9. A toy vehicle wheel comprising a circular body of soft sponge rubber having an axle forced diametrically therethrough, and circular metal washers disposed on said axle at the inside and outside faces of the wheel, said washers being spaced apart along the axle a distance less than the axial dimension of the circular body of sponge rubber, said washers holding said body under suf ficient compression to give the wheels the desired shape and to safely house the end of the axle within the outside face of the wheel, the outside washer being smaller in diameter than the inside washer.

10. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body having a drivers compartment at both the top and bottom, wheels on said body larger in diameter than the vertical dimension of the body, whereby said body may run with either side up, and a figure simulating a driver in said body, said figure being so arranged that a simulated drivers head comes to the top when the vehicle is run with either side up.

11. A toy racing automobile comprising a body having top and bottom walls, said walls being cut away to form a driving cockpit at both the top and bottom, wheels on said body larger in diameter than the vertical dimension of the body, whereby said body may run with either side up, and a figure simulating a driver in said body, said figure having a head at its upper end and a weight at its lower end and being pivotally mounted in the body. whereby the head comes to the top when the vehicle is run with either side up.

12. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body having a driving cockpit at both the top and bottom, wheels on said body larger in diameter than the vertical dimension of the body, whereby said body may run with either side up, and a figure simulating a driver in said body, said figure having a head at its upper end and a head at its lower end.

13. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body having a driving cockpit at both the top and bottom, wheels on said body larger in diameter than the vertical dimension of the body, whereby said body may run with either side up, a figure simulating a driver in said body, said figure having a head at its upper end and a head at its lower end and being movably mounted, and means to elevate the figure relative to the body regardless of which side of the vehicle is turned uppermost.

14. A toy racing automobile comprising a vehicle body having top and bottom walls, said walls being cut away to form a driving cockpit at both the top and bottom, wheels on said body larger in diameter than the vertical dimension of the body, whereby said body may run with either side up, and a figure simulating a driver in said body, said figure having a head at its upper end and a head at its lower end and being oscillatably mounted on an arm pivoted in said body and so weighted that the upper head is elevated out of the cockpit of the body and the lower head is drawn into the body regardless of which side of the vehicle is turned uppermost.

15. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, large wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the top may be run with either side up, a spring motor in said body geared to one of said axles in order to propel the vehicle, and stop means projecting at both the upper and lower sides of the vehicle for automatically stopping said motor against free unwinding when the vehicle is removed from its running surface.

16. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, large soft rubber wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and the shape and mounting of the wheels on the axles being such that the ends of the axles are housed well inside the outside faces of the wheels, a spring motor in said body geared to one of said axles in order to propel the vehicle, and stop means projecting at both the upper and lower sides of the vehicle for automatically releasing said motor for operation when the vehicle rests on a running surface, and for stopping said motor against free unwinding when the vehicle is removed from or bounces away from the running surface.

17. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, and large soft rubber wheelsmounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and the shape and mounting of the wheels on the axles being such that the ends of the axles are housed well inside the outside faces of the wheels, a bell inside said Vehicle body, and means geared to one of said axles for operating said bell when the vehicle is run along a suitable running surface with either side uppermost.

18. A toy vehicle comprising a relatively compact vehicle body, axles projecting. sidewardly near the front and rear ends thereof, large soft wheels mounted on said axles, the diameter and location of said wheels with respect to the body being such that the top, bottom, and ends of the body are housed within the peripheries of the wheels, and a cord connected to the middle of one end of the body for pulling the toy along, said cord being an elastic strand of rubber.

RAYMOND LOHR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3643375 *Oct 13, 1969Feb 22, 1972Royal London LtdMovable support
US3753313 *Apr 1, 1970Aug 21, 1973Bross HRemote controlled action toy
US4536169 *Oct 24, 1983Aug 20, 1985Mattel, Inc.Quick release spring powered toy vehicle
US5727985 *Mar 8, 1996Mar 17, 1998Tonka CorporationStunt performing toy vehicle
US5919075 *Nov 24, 1997Jul 6, 1999Hasbro, Inc.Stunt performing toy vehicle
US5921843 *Dec 4, 1997Jul 13, 1999Hasbro, Inc.Remote controlled toy vehicle
US6095890 *May 6, 1999Aug 1, 2000Hasbro, Inc.Stunt performing toy vehicle
US6439948 *Aug 19, 1997Aug 27, 2002Mattel, Inc.Two-wheeled amphibious toy vehicle
US6589098Feb 6, 2001Jul 8, 2003Mattel, Inc.Toy vehicle with pivotally mounted side wheels
US8038504Dec 10, 2010Oct 18, 2011Silverlit LimitedToy vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/272
International ClassificationA63H17/25, A63H17/00, A63H17/267
Cooperative ClassificationA63H17/25
European ClassificationA63H17/25