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Publication numberUS2064473 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1936
Filing dateFeb 27, 1933
Priority dateFeb 27, 1933
Publication numberUS 2064473 A, US 2064473A, US-A-2064473, US2064473 A, US2064473A
InventorsRichard A Holdsworth
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composition shingle
US 2064473 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ea, 15, 1936. R. A. HOLDSWORTH 2,664,473

COMPOSITION SHINGLE Filed Feb. 27, 1933 Fig]. Fig.5-

ll {ii I /39 349x1 2 H I In.. F T

2 39 3a 26 Fr/37 if I 1 1| 1|,

F3 W m m A nu l L mm \m other half of which lies in another plane.

Patented ec. 15, 1936 CQMPQSHTEON SGLE Richard A. Holdsworth,

Bayside, N. Y assignor to The Barrett Oompany, New York, N. E2, a corporation of New Jersey Application February 27,

4 Claims.

This invention relates tothe manufacture of roofing, and more particularly, to a strip shingle having tabs and complemental spaces along one longitudinal edge thereof.

One object of this invention is to provide a strip shingle having tabs and complemental spaces along one longitudinal edge thereof, the body portion of which is materially thicker than the tabs. Hence, when the shingles are applied to a roof or other surface in overlapping ,courses with theforward edges of the tabs of each course registering with the inner edges of the complemental spaces between thetabs of the preceding course, the forward edges of the thickened portions of each course form a continuous longitudinal shadow line constituted of alternate thick and thin portions. The thick shadow line portions are in registration with the butt edges of the tabs of the succeeding course and lend a massive thickbutt appearance to such tabs. The thickened portions of the body exposed between the tabs of the succeeding course produce the thin shadow line portions and give to the roof the effect of a plurality of individual symmetrical shingles, one half of each of which lies in one plane and the The entire roof area is covered with the thickened body portions forming an efficient' roof covering, both from theviewpoint of providing a durable and waterproof roof covering and the production of a roof covering of improved appearance and architectural value.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will appear from the following description.

In the preferred embodiments illustrated on the drawing, the invention is shown incorporated in a strip shingle having tabs of the particular shapes shown disposed along one longitudinal edge thereof and the present description will be confined to the present illustrated embodiment of the invention. It will be understood, however, that the novel features and improvements are susceptible of other applications, such, for example, as shingles having tabs of shapes other than the .shapes shown on the drawing. Hence, the scope of thisinvention is not confined to the embodiment herein y described.

' In the accompanying drawing, forming a part i this specification and showing, for purposes. v

of exemplification, preferred forms of this invention without limiting the claimed invention to 1933, Serial No. 658,789

(CE. 1087) v Fig. 2 is a plan view of a modified form of shingle embodying this invention;

Fig. 3 is a iragmentaryplan view showing a layout for cutting the shingles of Fig. 1 without waste from a suitable roofing'base;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan View showing a layout for cutting the shingle of Fig. 2 without waste from a suitable roofing base;

Fig. 5 shows the shingle of Fig. 1 arranged in overlapping courses;

Fig. 6 shows the shingle of Fig. 2 arranged in overlapping courses;

Fig. 7 is a side elevation, somewhat diagrammaticin character, depicting the procedure of making the shingle or this invention;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary plan view showing the coating and surfacing apparatus for applying the stripes of coating material to the granular surfaced base and surfacing the stripes;

Fig. 9 is a vertical section passing through the body portion and tab of a shingle; and

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating the roof shown in Fig. 6.

Referring to the drawing, with particular reference to Fig. '7, a sheet of fibrous material 5, which may be, and preferably is, of the usual roofing felt made from rag fiber and paper stock, with or without suitable fillers, as well known in this art, is fed by feed rolls 2 from the usual paper-making machine or felt roll into the saturating tank 3 of any well-known type- This tank may contain suitable cementitious waterproofing composition, such as asphalt or other bituminous material utilized for the impregnation and saturation of roofing felts.

Feed rolls l feed the saturated-sheet to a looping device 5. The passage of the saturated base through the looping'device 5 gives the saturant thenecessary opportunity to dry and thoroughly Coating roll] is rotatably mounted-in the coating tank 8. This tank may contain bituminous material, such as asphalt or other cementitious waterproofing substance, suitable for coating rooiing felt. One side of the sheet I! is completely coated by roll l. Waterproofing material is applied to the other side of the sheet by means of pipe 9, equipped with a discharge spent of a width approximately equal to that of the sheet, The coating material is spread uniformly over the top and bottom of the sheet as it passes between the coating rolls l and l l, excess coating flowing over the edges ofthe sheet into tank 6.

tacky, the coated sheet passes under the hopper 12 containing granular material, such as crushed rock or slate. Granular material is showered from the hopper by means of the usual distributing roll I3 onto the coated base therebeneath and adheres thereto. The thus surfaced sheet then passes about a reversing roll M, which functions to partially embed the granular material in the plastic coating. Excess granules fed to the fabric gravitate back to the hopper 12 as the sheet passes from reversing roll M to a second reversing roll it. As the sheet passes from roll M to roll i5, it comes under the hopper I6 containing mica dust, talc, or other composition capable of rendering the back of the sheet non-cementitious. The material from hopper i6 is discharged therefrom by distributing roll l1. In the continued movement of the talccovered sheet, after leaving reversing roll l5, excess talc falls off therefrom into the hopper l6. Guide rolls l8 cooperate with the rolls id and i5 to maintain the fabric in the desired operative position.

From the reversing roll E5, the fabric passes under a coating appliance 2i. lZ'his coating appliance may comprise three spaced tanks 22 (Fig. 8), each provided with a coating roll 23 rotatably disposed in the discharge outlet of the tank. The coating rolls 23 form three spaced parallel stripes or bands of coating material on the granular surfaced felt case, two of the stripes, indicated by the reference numerals 2d and 25, having one longitudinal edge thereof coincident with the marginal edges of the base. The intermediate stripe 26, it will be noted, is of a width equal to twice the width of the marginal stripes 2d and 25. stripes are tacky, the resultant base passes under the surfacing apparatus indicated by the referenoe numeral 271.

This apparatus comprises three spaced hoppers, each indicated by the reference character 28 disposed to apply granular material to the coatingbands on the sheet passing therebeneath. Each hopper is provided with the usual distributing roll 29 which showers the granular mate rial in the hoppers onto the coated base. From the surfacing apparatus Ell, the sheet passes about a reversing roll til which functions to partially embed the granular material in the coated stripes. Excess granular material falls on from the fabric into the hoppers 23 as the fabric passes about the reversing rolls 3E. The fabric then passes through calendering and cooling rolls Y 32 and between cutting cylinders 33. These cylinders are provided with knives to simultaneously produce longitudinal cut 35 (Figs. 3 and 4) along the median line of the intermediate stripe 26, broken cuts 35 defining semi-hexagonal tabs and complemental spaces longitudinally along the portion 36 between stripes 24, 26, and 25, 26, and transverse cuts 31 in staggered relation in the stripes 24, 25, and 26. The transverse cuts W are designed to provide a small triangular aligning projection 38 and a complemental recess 39 onthe opposite sides of the body portion of the shingle thus produced. The elements from the cutting rolls 33 pass onto a conveyor indicated generally by the reference numeral 4!.

In the cutting layout of Fig. 3, broken cuts 35 form tabs and complemental spaces, the forward ddges of the tabs indicated by the reference numeral 42 (Fig. 1) being of substantially great- While the coating er length than the line of jointure 43 between the tabs and the body portions. The tabs, it will be noted, are cut from the thin portions represented by the reference numeral 36 and the body portion is out from the thickened areas 24, 25, and 26 so that the body portion is substantially thicker than the tabs. In the cutting procedure of Fig. 4, broken cuts 35 define semihexagonal tabs, the forward edges 44 of which are of less length than the lines of jointure as between the tabs and the body portions. The body portions, as in the case of the shingle of Fig. l, are substantially thicker than the tabs, as is clearly evident from Fig. 9 which shows a vertical section through the tab and body portion of an element.

Referring to Fig. 9, reference character 66 indicates the saturated felt base which has the coating layers M, 4113 on opposite sides thereof, mica or other anti-stick material 49 being applied to the coating layer 48 on the back of the element. Granular material M is partially embedded throughout the coating layer ll and an additional coating layer 52 covers the body portion of the element. Granular material 53, which may be of a different color from that of the granules 56, is partially embedded in the coating layer 52.

Figs. 5, 6, and 10 show the shingles of Figs. 1 and 2, respectively, arranged in overlapping courses, the forward edges of the tabs overlying the inner edges of the recesses between the tabs and being widely spaced part to expose areas of the body portion of the underlying shingles corresponding to the areas of the tabs. Thus the entire roof area, as is evident from these figures, is covered by the thickened body portions of the elements. The reference character 5 3 indicates the forward edge of the inner recess of the thickened body portion underlying the forward edges of the tabs.- ,It will be observed the forward edges of the thickened body portions form continuous longitudinal shadow lines constituted of alternate thick portions 5 3 and thin portions 65 across the roof. Because of the relative thickness of the body portions, an appearance of thickness is imparted to the for= ward edges of the tabs, as illustrated rnost clearly in Fig. 10, and the resultant roof structure presents raised areas and areas in relief, imparting a pleasing appearance to the roof.

If the granular material 53 is of a color contrasting with that of hi, the resultant roof structure, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, will have the color of the tabs indicated by the letter 01' contrasting with the color of the body portion indicated by the character b. It will be noted from these figures that each course of shingles is composed of alternate areas of contrasting color, each area being of the same shape as the tabs and contiguous areas being inverted with respect to each other.

Since certain changes in carrying out the above process and certain modifications in the longitudinal edge thereof, a layer of waterproof coating material substantially covering said shingle, a layer of granular surfacing material partially embedded in said coating layer, a second layer of waterproof coating material covering only the body portion of said shingle, and a second layer of granular surfacing material partially embedded in said second coating layer whereby the body portion of said shingle is materially thicker than said tabs, said shingle being adapted to be laid in overlapping courses with other like shingles with the forward edges of the tabs of each course registering with the upper edges of the spaces between the tabs of the shingles of the underlying course whereby said thick body portions of the latter impart a thick butt appearance to the tabs of the overlying course.

2. A felt base strip shingle element comprising a body portion having widely spaced semihexagonal tabs separated by complemental spaces along one longitudinal edge thereof, a layer of waterproof coating material substantially covering said shingle element, a layer of granular surfacing material partially embedded in said coating layer, an overlay layer of waterproof coating material covering only the body portion of said shingle element and an overlay layer of granular surfacing material partially embedded in said second coatinglayer, said overlay layers rendering the body portion of said element materially thicker than said tabs, said element being adapted to be laid in overlapping courses with other like elements with the forward edges of the tabs of each course registering with the upper edges of the spaces between the tabs of the underlying course whereby the thick body portions of the underlying course produce pronounced shadow lines and impart a thick butt appearance to said tabs, each tab and the adjacent exposed part of the body portion of each element simulating an individual shingle having one half of its surface in one plane and the other half of its surface in another plane.

3. A felt basestrip shingle element comprising a body portion having widely spaced tabs separated by complemental spaces along one longitudinal edge thereof, a layer of bituminous waterproofing material substantially completely covering the upper surface of said shingle element, a layer of granular surfacing material of one color partially embedded in said coating layer, a second layer of bituminous waterproofing material covering the granular material on the body portion only of said shingle element, a second layer of granular surfacing material of a color different than that of first surfacing layer partially embedded in said second coatingv layer, said shingle element being adapted to be laid in overlapping courses with other like elements with the forward edges of the tabs of each course registering with the upper edges of the spaces between the tabs of the underlying course whereby said relatively thick body portions impart a thick butt appearance to said overlying tabs, said elements when laid producing the appearance of individual shingles each having one half thereof of one color and the'other half of a contrasting color.

4. A surface covering comprisingan assembly of shingles laid in overlapping courses, each course comprising body portions having tabs separated by complemental spaces along one longitudinal edge thereof, the butt edges of the tabs of each course registering with the inner edges of the spaces between the tabs of the preceding course and exposing to the weather areas of the body portions of said preceding course of substantially the size and shape of the tabs, each of said shingles being constituted of a felt base coated with waterproofing material,

the waterproof coating material on said body portions being thicker than on said tab portions so that the body portions are materially thicker than the tabs.

RICHARD A. HOLDSWORTH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5406766 *Jul 29, 1993Apr 18, 1995Monier Roof Tile Inc.Multi-color concrete tiles and method and apparatus for making same
US5595698 *Sep 13, 1994Jan 21, 1997Monier Roof Tile, Inc.Method of making multi-color concrete tiles
US5860263 *Feb 2, 1996Jan 19, 1999Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaThickened reinforced roofing shingle
US6105329 *Oct 15, 1998Aug 22, 2000Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaTrilaminate roofing shingle
US6679020 *Nov 26, 2001Jan 20, 2004Certainteed CorporationMulti-layered shingle and method of making same
WO1997028328A1 *Jan 13, 1997Aug 7, 1997Gaf Building MaterialsThickened reinforced roofing shingle
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/555, 52/557
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005
European ClassificationE04D1/26