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Publication numberUS2064603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1936
Filing dateFeb 2, 1932
Priority dateFeb 2, 1932
Publication numberUS 2064603 A, US 2064603A, US-A-2064603, US2064603 A, US2064603A
InventorsGertrude A Harrison
Original AssigneeGertrude A Harrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Audible signal device
US 2064603 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

DEC. 15, 1936. G'.A R soN AUDIBLE S IGNAL DEVICE Original Filed Feb. 2, 1932 ZSheets-Sheet l 6; 3 6 5 Jf i I i mrilmu. h I i I J 1 ldrrofiwar I Dec. 15, 1936. A, HARRISON 2,064,603

AUDIBLE S IGNAL DEVICE Original Filed Feb. 2, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 WM 4 i v lllllan Arroawzr Patented Dec. 15, 1936 UNITED STATEfi 2,064,603 'AUDIBLE SIGNAL DEVICE Gertrude A. Harrison, Cleveland, Ohio Application February 2, 1932, Seiial'No. 590,433 Renewed August '6, 1936 Claims. (01. 35-29 1 The invention relates to a device designed to indicate the occurrence of predetermined physical movements of a person using the device in connection with the practice vor playing of games,

5 musical instruments, etc.

In the playing of various games, such, for example, as golf, tennis and billiards, the timing of certain movements of the player is quite important and essential to the attainment of a satisfactory form'of technique. Thus, in the game of golf the wristmovement of the player near the end of the back swing of the 'drivingstroke and the reverse wrist movement during the for- Ward swing, are generally considered vitally-important; and there are analogous movements in the playing of tennis, billiards and other games. Similarly, in the playing of the violin the bowing movements of the player involve wrist movements whichare vitally important,-and there are anal- 0 ogous important movements in the playing of other instruments. Usually, as in the examples mentioned, the wristmovements are combined with full arm movements of the player and it is' difiicult for the player to concentrate his attention upon any part of the combined movement without disastrous effects upon the movement as a whole.

Accordingly, the general object of the present invention-is to provide a signal device which can be worn by the player and which, by' automatically giving an audible signal of the occurrence of a particular movement, such as a wrist movement, will enable the player to check a particular part of a combined or compound movement without mental concentration upon that particular part of the movement.

Another object of the invention is to provide a signal device of the character referred to which is adapted to be worn on the wrist of the person using it and to give an audible signal of the occurrence of wrist movements in two opposite directions, as in the case of the cooking and uncocking of the wrist during the back and forward swings, respectively, of a golf club in driving.

Aifurther object of the invention is to provide a signal device of the character referred to which is light in weight and compact so that it can be worn conveniently by the user.

50 Other objects of the invention comprise the production of a device of the character referred to that is simply constructed, reliable in operation and susceptible of manufacture at moderate cost. .Other objects more or lessincidental or'ancil- 55 laryitotthose. above mentioned will be apparent from the following detailed description of 'a preferred embodiment of the invention.

While my invention in its broader aspects may take a great variety of forms and is adaptedfor many and varied uses, I have chosen, for the purposes of explanation and illustratiomto show it as adapted to be worn upon thewrist in the practice and playing of golf.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, Fig. l'is a plan'viewpf an indicator embodying myimprovements.

"Fig. 2 is a view showing'the indicator as wor on the right wrist of a' golf player for the driving stroke, the wrist being in the cooked position as at the top of the back swing of the stroke.

Fig.3 is a similar view'showing the parts of the indicator in the positions occupiedwhen the wrist of the player isuncocked.

Fig. l is an enlarged sectionalplan view of the indicator proper, the section being taken on the lines 44 of Figs. 5 and "7.

Fig. 5 is a section on the 1ine'-5-5 of Fig.4.

Fig. 6 is a section on the line-66 of Fig. 4.

Fig. '7 is asection on the line "ll of. Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a detailed perspective View of the main signal-actuating member of the device.

Fig. 9 is a perspective detailed view of the intermediate signal-actuating lever.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary detailed perspective View of a portion of thecasing structure of the device. 7

Referring in detail to the construction illustrated, the signal'device comprises a casingstructure designated in its entirety by thenumeral l, said'structure beingcomparable inform and dimensions to a mans wrist watch. The casing comprises a bottom Wall .sectionZ (seeEig. 5).hav ing on two opposite sides upturned walls .or flanges 2= and 2 and a top wall section 3 which is also formed with depending side wall sections 3 and 3 and end wall sections 3 and 3 which fit over the side wall .parts or flanges and under edges of the bottom wall section 2. The two casing parts 2 and 3 are secured together in assembled relation byscrews 4, 4.

The end walls 3 and 3 of the casing member 3 are each formed with lugs 3 and .s to receive pins 5, 5 to which Wrist straps 6 and I aresecured, the strap 6 being fitted with axsuitable buckle 6 with which the strap Tcooperates to secure the device to the wrist of the wearer. The pins '5 are screw slotted. at one end and threaded at the other end to engage corresponding threads in the lugs .13 so that said pin can'readily be removed when it is desired to renew the wrist straps (see Fig. 4).

Within the casing of the device is arranged an audible signal member 8 in the form of a thin plate of spring steel in which a circular depression 8 has been pressed to locally distort or strain the member. The signal member 3 is carried by a support 9 which has a flanged base 9 rigidly secured to the bottom casing member 2 by means of a tongue 9 which projects into a slot 2 in the casing member 2 and a screw ID which secures the opposite side of the flanged base 9* to the bottom wall of the case. The signal member 8 is secured to the support 9 by flanges 9, 9 thereof (see Figs. 4 and 6) which grip and rigidly hold the opposite edges of the member, 8 adjacent one end thereof. A finger like extension I I is rigidly secured to the other end of the signal member 8.

With the signal member 8 thus supported, if it is flexed by depressing the finger extension II it acts, at a certain point in the bending movement, to emit a snapping sound which is loud enough to be easily heard by a person wearing the device and which is due to the strained or distorted form of the member 8, as is readily understood, this being a well known form of soundemitting or signalling device. If the pressure be removed from the finger extension II the elastic quality of the member 8 causes it to return to its straight or normal form and during this return movement the member 8 emits a second snapping sound. However, this second snapping sound occurs. at a point in the return movement nearer the normal position of the member 8 than does the snapping sound or signal which occurs during the depression or flexing of said member.

To effect a suitable movement of the signal member 8 to produce audible signals for the guidance of the wearer the device is fitted with an actuating plate or lever I2 which is movably connected to the casing I and projects therefrom so as toengage the back of the thumb of the wearer as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. The member I2 is formed on one side with a tongue I2 having an upstanding flange I2 and also with a tongue I2 having an upstanding flange I2 which is formed with a lever extension I2 Correspondingly, the side wall 2 of the casing member 2 is formed with a bayonet slot 2 and with a horizontal slot 2 The actuating lever I2 and casing member 2 are assembled by inserting the tongue I 2 into the upright portion of the bayonet slot 2 and then moving the member I2 laterally in relation to the member 2 so as to bring the tongue I2 into the horizontal section of the slot 2 and the tongue I2 into the slot 2, thus disposing the flanges I2 and I2 on the inner side of the wall 2 I3 is a second lever member arranged to engage the finger extension II of the signal device. The lever I3 has a fulcrum engagement at one end with a leg 2 formed on the wall 2*, the lever being formed with a hole I3 to receive the end of said leg so that the lever is secured against lateral displacement. The lever I3 is disposed so as to be engaged at its other end by means of the lever extension I2 of the actuating lever I2 and the lever I3 is formed with flanges I3 to engage the sides of the extension l2 and hold the two lever members in operative engagement.

It will be seen that in assembling the device all of the working parts are assembled on the bottom wall section 2 of the casing structure.

When they are thus assembled the top wall section 3 is applied to the bottom wall section and when this is done the end wall of the section 3, by engaging the part 32 of the actuating lever (see Fig. 4), serves to prevent lateral displacement of the lever i2, and as long as it is secured in operative position the resilient upward pressure of the finger extension II on the under side of the lever I3 serves to hold the latter in operative engagement with its fulcrum and the lever extension i2 of the actuating member I2.

A strip i l of soft leather is preferably interposed between the end of the signal support 9 and the adjacent end wall of the casing member 3, as I have found that this makes the audible signal clearer and stronger.

From the foregoing description the use and operation of the device will be understood with but little further explanation. Assuming the device is to be used in the practice or playing of golf, and that the player has strapped the device to his wrist as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3 for practice of the driving stroke, as the player about to drive addresses the ball the wrist of the right arm is straight, substantially as shown in Fig. 3. On the back swing, if the player keeps the left elbow straight or nearly so, the wrist of his right arm should come into a laterally bent or cooked position, as shown in Fig. 2, at the end of the back swing so as to bring the shaft of the club over his right shoulder. This cooking of the wrist at the top of the back swing causes the back of the players right thumb to press upon the actuating lever I2 of the signal device and move it from the position shown in Fig. 3 to that shown in Fig. 2. This movement of the lever I2 in turn causes depression of the lever I3 and the finger extension I I of the signal member 8. Near the end of this movement of the parts the signal member 8 passes its critical position and emits its characteristic snapping sound, thus audibly indicating to the player that he has achieved the proper wrist action in the back swing. On the forward swing of the club the right wrist of the player is straightened, thus permitting the resilient force of the signal member 3 to return the latter, and also the actuating levers I2 and I3, to their normalpositions, and during this return and at a point near the end thereof, the member 8 again passes its critical position and again emits its characteristic snapping sound, thus indicating to the player the point in his swing at which his wrist becomes substantially straight or uncooked.

The timing of the audible signal in relation to the movement of the main actuating lever I2 can be varied by slightly varying the form of the lever I3. As a practical matter this can be accomplished either by providing two or more interchangeable levers I3 so that the individual user of the device can select the particular form of lever I3 that best suits his requirements, or the user can, by slightly bending the lever I3, readily accomplish the same end. Ordinarily, however, a single standard form of construction, if properly designed, will be found to meet the needs of the great majority of users.

It will readily be understood that my improved signal device can be secured to the wrist in vari ous positions and that it can be worn upon either the right or the left wrist of the user. For example it can be secured to the left wrist of the user in a position such that the signal-actuating lever I2 will engage what is, in Figs. 2 and 3,

the under side of the hand and thus serve to 75;

indicatethe extreme uncocking action or position of the left hand as the driving :swing is carried through following impact of the club and ball. Again, the device can be worn upon either wrist in -a'position such that the actuating lever l2 will engage the middle part of the back of the hand, and thus worn the device serves as a check upon wrist action in the putting stroke. Various other applications of the device will be apparent to anyone using it.

The advantages to be derived from the use of my improved signal device or wrist indicator will be apparent to golf players and particularly to teachers of the game. With the device worn on the right wrist,the audible signal given at or near the end of the back stroke in driving when the right wrist is properly cocked serves to indicate to the player whether or not he is keeping his left arm straight, since the right wrist will not be fully cooked if the left elbow is bent. This audible signal at the top of the back stroke also makes it easier for the player to achieve a deliberate back swing and a momentary pause at the top of the swing, the desirability of which is well understood. On the forward swing from the top of the back stroke, the audible signal which is given as the wrist is returned to its straight or uncooked position enables the player to readily check the point in the swing at which he straightens his right wrist. Thus the player is greatly helped in overcoming the common fault of straightening the wrists too early in the forward swing, instead of waiting until a later point in the swing sothat the straightening of the wrists snaps the head of the club forward at high velocity at the time of impact with the ball.

Similar or analogous advantages are secured from the use of the signal when it is worn in the various other ways above indicated, as will be apparent without further discussion.

As is well understood by golf players, the movements of the player in swinging the golf club are relatively complex, involving movements of legs, hips, shoulders, arms and wrists. smoothness and rhythm in executing these combined movements are essential to successful play and it is difficult to secure such smoothness and rhythm if there is marked mental concentration by the player upon any one element of the combined movement. My improved audible signal has the notable advantage that its operation is wholly automatic and requires no special attention on the part of the player and yet the clear audible signal gives the player a check upon his wrist action without any particular mental concentra- From the foregoing description it will be obvious that my improved signal or indicator can be used to advantage in the practice or play of various other games, such as tennis and billiards, where wrist action plays an important part. Also in the practice and playing of various musical instruments, such as the violin, my wrist indicator can be used very advantageously. In fact it can be used to advantage in any practice or play where the timing of physical movements of the player is important. It is obvious that the device is not limited to the indication of wrist movements but, by suitable obvious modifications, can be applied to the relative movements of different parts of the players body where relative movement occurs.

The parts of the signal device illustrated can,

for the most part, be pressed or stamped from sheet metal and can be assembled easily and rapidly, so that the device is susceptible of production at moderate cost. The parts of the device can be made of a variety of suitable metals, or other materials, as will be understood. The top casing part, in particular, can be made of different metals and other materials and varied as to form and ornamentation as desired.

While the specific construction of the device illustrated is such as I have found preferable, it will be understood that it can in all respects be varied widely within the scope of my invention, which is defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. Ina device for indicating the physical movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of audible signal means; means for securing said signal means on one part of thewearers person; and means operatively connected to the signal and securing means and adapted to be engaged and moved by another part of the wearers person to actuate the signal means and thereby indicate the occurrence of a particular relative movement of the two said parts of the wearers person.

2. In a device for indicating physical movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of audible signal means; a support therefor adapted to be secured to one part of the wearers person; and means movably connected to the support and adapted to be engaged and moved by another part of the wearers person to actuate the signal means and thereby indicate the occurrence of a particular relative movement of the two said parts of the wearers person.

3. In a device for indicating physical movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of audible signal means; a support therefor adapted to be secured to one part of the wearers person; and means movably con' nected to the support and adapted to be engaged and moved by another part of the wearers person to actuate the signal means, the signal means, support and movable means being so constructed and arranged that the signal means is actuated to give audible signals indicating certain relative positions of the two said parts of the wearers person when said parts are relatively moved in opposite directions.

4. In a device for indicating physical movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of audible signal means; a support therefor adapted to be secured to one part of the wearers person; and means movably connected to the support and adapted to be engaged and moved by another part of the wearers person to actuate the signal means, the signal means, support and movable means being so constructed and arranged that when the two said parts of the wearers person are moved relatively in opposite directions the signal is actuated at one point in the movement in one direction and at another point in the reverse movement.

5. In a device for indicating physical movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of audible signal means; a support therefor adapted to be secured to. a limb of the wearer adjacent a joint; and means movably connected to the support and adapted to be engaged by the said limb of the wearer and moved by the wearers movement at said joint to actuate the signal means at a certain point in the movement.

6. In a device for indicating wrist movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of a casing structure; means for securing the said structure on the wrist of a wearer; an audible signal device enclosed in the casing; and means for actuating the signal device comprising a member movably connected to the casing structure and arranged to be engaged by the hand of the wearer, whereby when the wrist is bent the said means is moved and caused to actuate the signal device.

'7. In a device for indicating wrist movements of a person wearing the device, the combination of a casing structure; means for securing the said structure on the wrist of a wearer; an audible signal device enclosed in the casing and comprising a flexible resilient member formed with a local strain and adapted both when flexed from its normal form and when resuming its normal form after such flexing to emit an audible snapping sound; and means for flexing the resilient signal member comprising a member movably connected to the casing and extending therefrom to be engaged and moved by the hand of the wearer when the wrist is flexed.

8. A device of the character described, comprising a signal, means for attaching the signal to the arm of a player, means for actuating the signal, and means connected to the actuating means for operating the latter in response to bending and unbending of the wrists to effect operation of the signal.

9. A device of the character described, comprising a support adapted to be secured to one part of a. wearers person; actuating means connected to said support and relatively movable with respect thereto, and adapted to be operated by movement of another part of the wearers person; and audible signal means carried by said device and actuable through relative movements of said actuating means with respect to said support, to indicate the occurrence of a particular relative movement of the two said parts of the wearers person.

10. A device of the character described, comprising a signal means adapted to be secured to one part of a wearers person; and means actuable by movement of another part of the wearers person, and movable with reference to said first part, for actuating said signal means to indicate the occurrence of a particular relative movement of the two said parts of the wearers person.

GERTRUDE A. HARRISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585075 *Jun 10, 1949Feb 12, 1952Peter BadovinacPosture training device
US3350100 *Jun 28, 1965Oct 31, 1967Alfred B CarminesGolfer's training aid including wrist movement indicator means
US3860245 *May 15, 1974Jan 14, 1975Nobuo YamadaDevice for adjusting backswing arm positions of a golf player
US4048726 *Dec 10, 1975Sep 20, 1977Lefebvre Albert WApparatus for sighting a projectile firing weapon
US4222569 *Oct 2, 1978Sep 16, 1980Demascolo Guy JBent wrist signal device
US4330123 *Sep 30, 1980May 18, 1982Ben KleinermanDevices and methods for improving bowling skills
US4392830 *Oct 27, 1981Jul 12, 1983Norman SalzmanBody coordination training aid
US4614343 *Feb 11, 1985Sep 30, 1986Snapper, Inc.Golf swing training device
US4699379 *Apr 14, 1986Oct 13, 1987Robert E. ChateauAthletic monitoring device
US4743028 *Mar 26, 1985May 10, 1988Keith HarrisonGolf swing practice device
US5324038 *Jul 10, 1991Jun 28, 1994Thurman SasserGolfer's monitoring system
US5423547 *Apr 20, 1993Jun 13, 1995Puso; JosephArm position monitoring device
US5522401 *Jan 23, 1995Jun 4, 1996Brucker; MiltonStomach muscle/posture monitoring belt
US5588919 *Jul 17, 1995Dec 31, 1996Nakamura; YoshikazuGolf swing training device
US5745028 *Apr 29, 1994Apr 28, 1998Sound Motion, Inc.Directional motion instrumentation system
US5823886 *Aug 20, 1997Oct 20, 1998Fred Collins And William B. Murray, A Texas PartnershipNon restrictive dorsiflexion feedback apparatus for golfers
US5876292 *May 1, 1998Mar 2, 1999Hamilton; David PaulAudible wrist angle indicator for golfers
US6012988 *Aug 13, 1998Jan 11, 2000Burke; Thomas J.Golf club with overswing alerting mechanism
US6101366 *Jun 18, 1999Aug 8, 2000Castillo; CeliaSound belt for diapers
US6991552Apr 25, 2002Jan 31, 2006Burke Thomas JSwing monitoring device
US8038549 *Jun 29, 2010Oct 18, 2011Kayode Teddy VannBasketball shooting training aid and method for its use
US8512161 *Oct 12, 2012Aug 20, 2013Brian DalbkeGolf glove training device
WO1985004337A1 *Mar 26, 1985Oct 10, 1985Keith HarrisonGolf swing practice device
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/252, 116/67.00R, 473/464, 473/59, 446/415, D11/6, 473/234, 446/26, 473/205
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2071/0625, A63B69/3608
European ClassificationA63B69/36B