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Publication numberUS2065388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1936
Filing dateFeb 28, 1936
Priority dateFeb 28, 1936
Publication numberUS 2065388 A, US 2065388A, US-A-2065388, US2065388 A, US2065388A
InventorsMitchell Allister S
Original AssigneeNat Automotive Fibres Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stuffed plaited upholstery and method of manufacture
US 2065388 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1936. M c 2,065,388

STUFFED PLAITED UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed Feb. 28, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Dec. 22, 1936. A. s. MITCHELL 2,065,338

STUFFED PLAITED UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD MANUFACTURE Filed Feb. 28, 1936 5 Sheets- Sheet 2 Dec. 22, 1936. A. s. MITCHELL STUFFED PLAITED UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed Feb. 28, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 llmrilllllllilll1 "III! zmww.

Patented Dec. 22, 1936 PATENT OFFICE STUFFED PLAITED UPHOLSTERY AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Allister s. Mitchell, Detroit, Mich, assignor to National Automotive Fibres,

Mich. a corporation Inc., Detroit,

of Delaware vApplication February 28,- 1936, Serial No. 66,297

4 Claims.

This invention relates particularly to stuffed plaited upholstery adapted to be used as coverings for the springs of automobile cushions, or as trim-panel covers for the interior trim of auto- 5 mobile bodies.

The primary object is to provide an improved method ofapplying the lateral flap, or so-called hamfto upholstery of the character mentioned.

The present application constitutes a continuation in part of my application Ser. No. 16,868, filed April 17, 1935.

For several years, stuffed, plaited cushions have been manufactured in a multiplaiter sewing-machine from which the upholstery issues in the form of a series of stuffed plaited cushions con-' .nected by a continuous lining-fabric. The fabric is severed between cushions, after emergence from the multiplaiter machine; Such a machine is shown, for example, in Mitchell Patent No. 1,996,728 granted April 2, 1935.

In accordance with the practice heretofore, th lateral flaps, or so-called hams have been applied to the individual cushions after the'-l-iningfabric has been severed between cushions.

Such practice is tedious and unnecessarily expensive. I have discovered that it is possible to pre-tack the hams to the pre-cut covers, and then pass the pre-cut cover, thus equipped,

through the multiplaiter sewing-machine which manufactures the series of plaited stuffed cushions. This is done in such manner that the "tacking-joint! is formed into a seam-portion;

and thus, after the sewing operation, the tacking-joint" is imbedded in the seam, and is in no wise visible at the finish-surface of the cushion.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which- Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a p're-cut cover, having a lateral flap tacked thereto, the view illustrating the manner in which seam-portions are formed in the pre-cut cover as it is fed forwardly over the bed of the multiplaiter sewingmachine, it being understood that the finish-surface of the cover is at the lower side; Fig. 2, a broken plan view illustrating the "manner in which the lateral flap is tacked" to the cover; Fig. 3, a perspective view illustrating the manner in which a continuous lining-fabric and a series of pre-cut covers are passed through the multiplaiter, cotton batts introduced into the plaits, and the seam-portions of the fabrics united by lines of stitching; Fig. 4, a view illustrating the manner in which the seam-portions of the fabrics are brought into completely nested relation as the upholstery passes beneath a forming-roll employed in the machine; Fig. 5, a broken transverse vertical sectional view illustrating the manner in which the sewing is performed; Fig. 6, a similar view showing the sewed seam; Fig. '7, a broken perspective vview of a detached cushion; Fig. 8, a view similar to Fig. 6, but showing a different form of seam; Fig. 9, a broken transverse sectional view illustrating the manner in which still another form of scam may be'made; Fig. 10, a broken transverse sectional view illustrating the position of the seam after-the cushion has been' completed and the lining stretched transversely; and Fig. 11, a broken perspective view showing connected cushions.

Referring to Figs. 1-6, A designates a continu- I ous lining-fabric; B, aseries of pre-cut covers having lateral flaps tacked thereto; and C,

tion of the upholstery.

In the form of seam shown in Figs. 1-6, the fabrics are provided, as they pass through'the machine, with M-shape seam-portions which are brought into nested relation in the mannerillustrated in Fig. 4.

Referring to Fig. 1, the cover B has formed therein, as it moves forwardly over the bed of the machine, a series of box-like seam-portions l, which provide the required fullness, and the central portions are progressively depressed to form central depressed welt-portions I and upstanding ridges l Referring to Fig. 3, the continuous lining A, drawnfrom any suitable source (not shown) is provided with seam-portions 2 which are given an M-form cross-section by any suitable means (not shown).

, The M-shape seam-portions of the fabrics are brought into completely nested relation in the manner shown in Fig. 4; and it will be noted that the seam-portion of the lining has a depressed central ridge 2 and upstanding ridges 2 Referring to Fig. 2, the pre-cut cover B has attached thereto the lateral flap B. The fabrics are brought into abutting relation at the line 3;

and the fabrics are then connected by criss-cross stitching, as indicated at 3*.

Referring again to Fig. 4, the fabrics pass forward over ridge-bars 4 which have different forms of cross-section at differentpoints to enable the seam-pcrtions to be properly shaped. The ridgebars over which the seam-portions of the covers are passed extend longitudinally of the bed of the machine and pass beneath a forming roll D which comprises a rotating shaft D and a series of spaced collars D (one shown) The collar D is provided with a circumferential groove 5 adapted toaccommodate the seamportions of the fabric. The fabrics are brought into partially nested relation as they start to pass beneath the forming roll D, and are completely nested in passing beneath the forming roll. The forming roll is provided, at each collar D, with a comparatively thin disk fi'which coacts with the corresponding ridge-bar l to complete the nesting of the seam-portions.

Fig. 5 illustrates the manner in which the seamportions are sewed together, the particular seam there illustrated being the one involving the tacking-Joint" 3. The seam-embracing foot 1 of the sewing-head 1' permits the seam to pass therethrough; and the sewing is accomplished by means of a curved sewing-needle 8 carried by an arm 8*. Ordinarily, a looper is employed to coact with the needle 9, but the looper is not illustrated in Fig. 5. By means of mechanism of this character, the seam-portions of the fabric are connected by lines of stitching 9.

Referring to Figs. 5 and 6, it will be understood that the finish-side of the cushion is turned downwardly; also, that the tacking-joint 3 is buried in the seam and is invisible. This is accomplished without in any wise eakening the seam.

Referring to Fig. 8, it wil be noted that the seam-portions of the cover and the lining-fabric are of U-form, but the tacking-joint" 3 is buried in the seam.

Referring to Figs. 9 and 10, the seam illustrated corresponds with that produced by the mechanism shown in Mitchell Patent 1,997,374 granted April 9, 1935. In Fig. 9, the sewing-needle is designated I0 and coacts with a looper-device ll which is temporarily located between the coverfabric and the lining-fabric as the manufacture of the upholstery progresses. It will be noted that the tacking-joint 3 is so located that after the sewing operation the tacking-joint will be hidden. In Fig. 10, the lines of stitching are designat-ed l2. In this instance, as in the previously described instances, the tacking-joint is hidden in the seam, and the "tacking-joint in no wise lessens the strength of the seam.

Referring to Fig. 11, the cushions come from the machine in a series, connected by the continu-- ous lining-fabric. The cushions may be cut apart and trimmed by means of an electric cutter, in known manner.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unneces sary limitations should be understood therefrom, but the appended claims should be construed as broadly as permissible in view of the prior art.

What I regard as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A method of forming upholstery, which comprises: preparing a cover by tacking together in an abutting-edge joint 0. main cover-portion and a lateral flap portion; forming, while advancing the fabrics, a plurality of nested seamridges from said cover and a lining-fabric with the abutting-edge joint embraced in one of the nested seam-ridges; and simultaneously sewing the nested seam-ridges.

2. In upholstery manufacture, a method which comprises: preparing pre-cut covers, each comprising a main cover-portion and a lateral flapportion tacked together in an abutting-edge joint; advancing said covers seriatim and forming therein raised seam-portions and intervening plait-fullnesses one of said seam-portions embracing said abutting-edge joint; advancing a continuous lining-fabric and forming seam-portions therein and bringing them into engagement with the seam-portions of said pre-cut covers, in turn; and progressively sewing the seam-portions of said lining-fabric to the seam-portions of said pre-cut covers.

3. In upholstery manufacture, a method which comprises: preparing pre-cut covers, each comprising a main cover-portion and a lateral flapportion tacked together in an abutting-edge joint advancing said covers seriatim and forming therein raised seam-portions and intervening plait-fullnesses, one of said seam-portions embracing said abutting-edge Joint; advancing a continuous lining-fabric and forming seam-portions therein and bringing them into engagement 'with the seam-portions of said pre-cut covers, in turn; introducing batts into the plaits as they are formed; and progressively sewing the seam portions of said lining-fabric to the, seam-portions of said pre-cut covers.

4. Upholstery comprising a series' of covers, each consisting of a main cover-portion and a lateral flap-portion tacked thereto in an abuttingedge joint, said covers having seam-portions and intervening plait-fullnesses, one of said seamportions having said abutting-edge joint embraced therein; and a continuous lining-fabric having seam-portions embracing the seam-portions of said covers and sewed thereto.

ALLISTER S. MITCHELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025194 *Dec 5, 1957Mar 13, 1962Gustin Bacon Mfg CoMethod of and apparatus for forming channeled upholstery
US4244996 *Feb 2, 1979Jan 13, 1981Maloney Jennifer APatchwork fabric configuration and process
US4665849 *Dec 13, 1985May 19, 1987Isothermic Engineering & Research LimitedManufacture of casings for quilted articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/426, 112/420, 112/417, 112/427
International ClassificationB68G7/00, B68G7/08
Cooperative ClassificationB68G7/08
European ClassificationB68G7/08