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Publication numberUS2066419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1937
Filing dateJul 16, 1935
Priority dateJul 26, 1934
Publication numberUS 2066419 A, US 2066419A, US-A-2066419, US2066419 A, US2066419A
InventorsJosef Pfistershammer
Original AssigneeJosef Pfistershammer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tubular post
US 2066419 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1937. J. PFISTERSHAMMER TUBULAR POST Filed July l6, 19

Patented Jan. 5, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application July 16, 1935, Serial No. 31,954 In the Netherlands July 26, 1934 6 Claims.

This invention relates to a tubular post tapering towards the upper end and with supporting arms for the electric wires on the upper portion of the post.

The invention consists particularly in the simple construction and fitting together of the post when erecting, the post being composed of a plurality of tubular sections and the supporting arms equipped with sleeves fitting on the uppermost section of the post, and all the tubular sections of the post and the supporting arms with their sleeves being fitted and clamped together in a simple manner.

The invention likewise consists in the construction and fitting together of the post in such a manner that the interior of the post is ventilated and moisture condensing on the inner side of the wall of the post can drain oil to the outer side thereof.

Several embodiments of the invention are illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawing in which:-

Fig. 1 shows the upper portion of a post in longitudinal section.

Fig. 2 is a similar view of a post of modified construction.

Fig. 3 shows a third form of construction in elevation.

Figs. 4 and 5 are cross-sections on lines IV-IV and VV of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a cross-section on line VIVI of Fig. 1 and shows a modification of the post in Fig. 1.

Figs. '7 and 8 are cross-sections on lines VIIVII and VIII-VIII of Fig. 2.

Figs. 9 and 10 are cross-sections on lines IX-IX and X-X of Fig. 3.

The tubular sections of the post according to the invention are made of sheet steel 0.8 to 2.5 ms in thickness, the lowermost section having the thickest and the uppermost the thinnest wall thickness. The tubular sections are about 2 metres in length and, to protect them against turning are of oval or elliptical cross-section; and in a certain form of construction may be of circular cross-section. They taper gradually from their lower end to their upper end so that the wider lower end of each tubular section of the post fits over a short length of the narrower upper end of the preceding tubular section.

The lower part of every section fits very accurately upon the upper part of the preceding section. The Wall thickness of the sections is very thin, the circumference of the sections is very great relative to the wall thickness. The ends of the sections are therefore yieldable and elastic so that their elliptic edge might be deformed by the hands. If, however, one section is placed with its lower part upon the upper part of the preceding section and strongly pressed down, the telescoped parts of the sections come into such 5 intimate contact that the sections can no longer be mutually turned and also not separated the one from the other without separate auxiliary means. No connecting means are therefore required to protect the telescoped sections against 10 turning and getting loose.

The lower ends. of the sections, owing to their yieldability, can even be clamped over unevennesses, and projections on the upper ends of the preceding sections and thus enable longitudinal 15 channels to be formed between the clamping surfaces of the superposed portions of the sections, through which channels air circulates between the interior of the post and the atmosphere and moisture condensing on the inner surface of the post can run out through these channels. The same advantage is attained when the tubular sections are lap-welded. The lower edges of the sections can easily be stretched over the overlapping edges at the upper ends of the preceding sections. The supporting arms for the electric wires are clamped and stretched over the upper most tubular section in a similar manner as every supporting arm is arranged on an elliptical sleeve tapering towards its upper end, the internal circumference of said sleeve being fitted and clamped at a certain point on the uppermost tubular section. These sleeves can likewise be clamped over projections on the tubular section, so that channels are formed between the clamping surfaces, through which channels any water which penetrates between the clamping surfaces can flow 011.

All the forms of construction illustrated have for their object to enable the post and the supporting arms for the electric wires to be made and erected in the simple manner described, to form air channels between the clamping surfaces at the joints and to make all joints secure against turning and working loose. 45

Fig. 1 shows the upper four tubular sections I,

2, 3, 4 of a post with two sleeves 5 and 6 clamped on the uppermost section I and carrying supporting arms 1 and 8 for electric wires. The post is covered at its upper end by means of a cap, the side wall of which, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, may be provided with grooves to allow air to escape from the interior of the post. The wide lower ends of the tubular sections l, 2, 3 and so on are each slipped over the narrower upper ends of the preceding sections 2, 3, 4 respectively and adapted to be pressed the one over the other along a short length. Particularly the lower end of each tubular section is yieldable owing to the thinness of the sheet steel employed, which'is only 0.8 to at the most 2.5 mms thick, so that the two section ends fitted the one over the other are clamped tightly together. The sleeves 5 and B carrying the supporting arms 1 and 8 respectively, like the tubular sections, are of oval or elliptical cross section and taper corresponding to the upper section I so that their internal circumference corresponds with the outer circumference at certain points of the upper section I. These points on the upper section I are determined by the distances for which the supporting arms 1 and 8 are to be spaced in vertical direction. from which these sleeves are made is as thin as that of the uppermost tubular section so that these short sleeves are also yieldable along their entire length and can consequently be tightly clamped on the section l. The sections I, 2, 3, 4 and also the sleeves 5, 6 are butt-welded at their seam. The clamping surfaces at the individual fitting points of the sections and sleeves may under certain circumstances bear tightly on one another so as to form air and water-tight joints. It is, however, preferable to make the interior of the post communicating with the atmosphere and especially to lead off the moisture which condenses, runs down the outer side of the walls of the sections, collects on the upper edges of the sections on to which they are fitted, and in the course of time penetrates between the clamping surfaces. The water which runs down the outer side of the uppermost tubular section also collects on the upper edges of the sleeves 5, 6 and in. the course of time penetrates between the clamping surfaces of the section and sleeves. Fig. 6 shows how the water can be conducted off in a construction when the sections and sleeves are made with butt-welded seams. One or several rods 9 are inserted between the clamping surfaces and the walls of the portion of the next following tube to be fitted is stretched over these inserts. The inserts are; preferably fitted on the two longer sides of the oval cross-section and they may be formed by a wire or strip of sheet metal provided with a hook which is hooked over the upper edge of the tubular section before the next'following tubular section is fitted. In a similar manner such inserts may be hung in the sleeves 5, 6. As shown in Fig. 6 gaps ID are formed adjacent these inserts 9 between the clamping surfaces, through which gaps water condensed on the interior of the post can drain off between the clamping surfaces of two sections and. rain water which has penetrated between the upper section and the sleeve can flow off.

In the modified form of construction illustrated in Fig. 2 the tubular sections H, l2, l3, l4 have lap-welded seams. The overlap is situated on one of the wide sides of each tubular section and the sections are fitted together so that the overlap seams of neighbouring tubular sections are on opposite sides of the post. The tubular sections, owing to the yieldability of their ends, can be stretched over the overlap edges, but a gap 20 or 20 is formed between the clamping surfaces, beside the outer overlap edge IQ of the inner section end and beside the inner overlap edge iii of the outer section end, through which gap the water of condensation can flow off (Fig.

The sheet metal.

7). The sleeves l5, IS with the supporting arms l1, l8 may have butt-welded seams, as in Fi 1, and in this instance a longitudinal channel is then formed between the clamping surfaces along the outer overlap edge of the upper tubular section I I. Or the sleeves may also be lap-welded like the tubular sections so that at the overlap edge l9 of the tubular section II and at the overlap edges IQ of the sleeves, channels 20 or 20 respectively are formed through which the water can drain off from the clamping point.

In the modification shown in Fig. 3 the tubular sections 2|, 22, 23, 24 of the post are each composed of two long pieces which are united by two lap-welded longitudinal seams. The seams 28 extend obliquely along the tubular sections and are all parallel in all the tubular sections. When the ends of the tubular sections are clamped the one on the other, the outer overlap edge of the inner tubular section and the inner overlap edge of the outer tubular section come together at each clamping point. Between these joining overlap edges a narrow gap 30 is formed and serves as draining channel between the clamping surfaces. The sleeves 25, 26 on which the supporting arms 21, 28 are welded may be made in a similar manner like the tubular sections 2 l, 22, or they may have only a butt-welded seam, as shown in Fig. 1. In both instances draining channels are formed owing to the lapwelding of the seams of the uppermost tubular section 2|.

It is evident that in this form of construction the overlap edges of the inner and outer tubular sections meeting at the joints give an additional security against turning of the tubular sections and that consequently, in this construction, the tubular sections need not be of oval cross-section, but may be of circular cross-section. This form of construction is therefore applicable also for posts composed of cylindrical tubular sections which taper gradually towards the upper ends.

The post can be fitted together lying on the ground and erected in finished condition. When climbing the post by means of climbing irons, the individual tubular sections and the sleeves of the supporting arms are pressed and clamped tightly one in the other by the weight of the workman climbing the post. The tubular sections for the upper post, owing to their light weight, can easily be carried up and fitted by the workman climbing the post.

Owing to the tubular sections and also the sleeves of the supporting arms being tightly clamped together, it is scarcely possible for the tubular sections and for the supporting arms to turn mutually. Such a turning is further rendered impossible by the oval cross-sectioned shape of the tubular sections and sleeves and by the inserts or overlap edges forming the draining channels, and, in the arrangement according to Fig. 3, the abutting overlap edges also form an abutment which prevents mutual turning of the post sections.

I claim:-

i. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of tubular sections tapering towards the upper end and made of sheet steel of such thin thickness that the ends of the sections are yieldable and spreadable, the wide lower end of each tubular section slipped over a length of the narrow upper end of the preceding section, all said sections being of elliptic cross-section to prevent mutual turning, supporting arms for electric wires each having a sleeve tapering towards its upper end and made of thin sheet steel so that it is yieldable and spreadable along its entire length, said sleeves adapted to be slipped over the narrow upper end of the upper tubular section of the post and having an elliptic cross section corresponding with the elliptic cross section of said upper tubular section to prevent mutual turning.

2. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of tubular sections tapering towards the upper end and made of pieces of sheet steel with lap-welded seams, the sheet steel being so thin that the ends of the tubular sections are yieldable and spreadable, the wide lower end of each tubular section adapted to clamp on a short length of the narrow upper end of the preceding tubular section, the edges of the overlap seams forming channels between the clamping surfaces at the joints between the fitted tubular sections, supporting arms for electric wires each having an oval sleeve at the inner end, said sleeve tapering in upward direction and being made of thin sheet steel so that it is yieldable and spreadable along its entire length, said sleeves adapted to be slipped over the narrow upper end of the upper tubular section of the post and having an internal circumference corresponding to the outer circumference of the uppermost tubular section at a predetermined point of its height and adapted to clamp on the upper tubular section each one at its predetermined point.

3. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of tubular sections tapering gradually in upward direction and of oval cross-section, said tubular sections being made of sheet steel with lap-welded seams and so thin that the ends of the tubular sections are yieldable and spreadable each tubular section adapted to clamp with its wide lower end over a short length of the narrower upper end of the preceding tubular section, and to stretch the overlap seam edges, supporting arms for electric wires, a tapered sleeve of oval cross section at the inner end of each supporting arm, each sleeve made of sheet steel with lap-welded seam and of such slight thickness that the seams are yieldable and spreadable, the internal circumference of said sleeves corresponding with the external circumference at a certain point of the upper tubular section of the post and adapted to clamp on to these points of the upper tubular section and to spread over the overlap edge of this tubular section.

4. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of tubular sections tapering gradually in upward direction and of oval cross-section, each of said tubular sections composed of two pieces of sheet steel with opposite lap-welded seams and so thin that the ends of the sections are elastic and expansible, the lower wide end of each tubular section being clamped on the narrow upper end of the preceding tubular section, and the overlap welded seams of the two parts of each tubular section extending obliquely in the tubular sections and the seams of all tubular sections parallel to one another, and the tubular sections fitted together so that at the joints between two tubular sections the inner overlap edge of the outer tubular section and the outer overlap edge of the preceding tubular section meet and form an abutment to prevent mutual turning of the tubular sections, a gap being formed between the two meeting overlap edges forming a channel between the clamping surfaces at the clamping point, supporting arms for electric wires each having an oval sleeve at the inner end of said sleeve tapering in upward direction and being made of thin sheet steel so that it is yieldable and spreadable along its entire length, said sleeves adapted to he slipped over the narrow upper end of the upper tubular section of the post and having an internal circumference corresponding to the outer circumference of the uppermost tubular section at a predetermined point of its height and adapted to clamp on the upper tubular section each one at its predetermined point.

5. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of tubular sections tapering gradually in upward direction and of oval crosssection, each of said tubular sections composed of two pieces of sheet steel with opposite lap-welded seams and so thin that the ends of the sections are elastic and expansible, the lower wide end of each tubular section being clamped on the narrow upper end of the preceding tubular section, and the overlap welded seams of the two parts of each tubular section extending obliquely in the tubular sections and the seams of all tubular sections parallel to one another, and the tubular sections fitted together so that at the joints between two tubular sections the inner overlap edge of the outer tubular section and the outer overlap edge of the preceding tubular section meet, supporting arms for electric wires, a tapered sleeve of oval cross section at the inner end of each supporting arm each sleeve formed of two pieces of sheet steel with two opposite lap-welded seams and so thin that the pieces are elastic, the internal circumference of said sleeves corresponding with the outer circumference of a certain point of the uppermost tubular section of the post, the sleeves clamped on to the uppermost tubular section of the post and stretched over the overlap edges thereof at the predetermined point, the overlap edges of the sleeves being obliquely directed and parallel to those of the uppermost tubular section and the sleeves being so clamped on this tubular section that the inner overlap edges of the sleeves meet the outer overlap edges of the uppermost tubular section, a gap being formed between the meeting overlap edges and forming a channel between the clamping surface of said sleeves and of said uppermost tubular section.

6. A tubular post, comprising in combination a plurality of conical tubular sections, each section composed of two pieces of sheet steel of semicircular cross-section and with two mutually 0pposite lap-welded seams, and the sheet steel being so thin that the ends of the sections are elastic, ,i

the wide lower end of each section clamped on to a short length of the narrow upper end of the preceding tubular section and fitted so that the inner overlap edges of the outer tubular section are opposite the outer overlap edges of the pre ceding tubular section and form an abutment against turning of the tubular sections, support ing arms for electric wires, a tapered sleeve of thin pliable sheet steel at the inner end of each supporting arm, the internal surface of each sleeve corresponding to the external surface of the uppermost tubular section of the post at a certain point of said tubular section, each sleeve clamped on the point of said uppermost tubular section and stretched over the overlap edges thereof at this point.

J OSEF PFISTERSHAMMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2702103 *Nov 3, 1949Feb 15, 1955Josef PfistershamerTubular pole
US3270480 *Apr 7, 1965Sep 6, 1966William BeeckerTapered sectional support pole
US5880404 *Jun 26, 1997Mar 9, 1999Advanced Metals Technology CorporationPower transmission support structures
US6173537 *Dec 12, 1994Jan 16, 2001Mafi AbAntenna tower
US6191355 *Nov 20, 1998Feb 20, 2001Hans P. EdelsteinMulti-sectional utility pole having slip-joint conical connections
US6250596May 13, 1998Jun 26, 2001Musco CorporationSpacer between pole and cross-arm
US6399881 *Feb 9, 2001Jun 4, 2002Hans P. EdelsteinMulti-sectional utility pole having slip-joint conical connections
US6685154Jul 27, 2000Feb 3, 2004Robert BlythConnector and method for assembling structural elements together without the use of weldments
US7171793 *Sep 26, 2001Feb 6, 2007Musco CorporationMeans and method for rigidly elevating a structure
US7754046 *Jun 23, 2005Jul 13, 2010Exit Engineering S.R.L.Process for structurally joining modular hollow columns or rods generically elongated in shape and the product obtained
US8272607 *Aug 8, 2008Sep 25, 2012Droll Yankees, Inc.Support system for bird feeder
US9010703 *Aug 26, 2010Apr 21, 2015Acronimus Technology, S.L.Kit for mounting one or more appliances on a pole
US9234712 *Jul 31, 2012Jan 12, 2016Abb Inc.Self-aligning plug for positioning a temperature sensor within a transformer winding
US9725921 *Apr 20, 2015Aug 8, 2017Acronimus Technology SlKit for mounting one or more appliances on a pole
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US20080296453 *Aug 8, 2008Dec 4, 2008Droll Yankees, Inc.Bird feeder
US20130167367 *Aug 26, 2010Jul 4, 2013Acronimus Technology, S.L.Kit for mounting one or more appliances on a pole
US20140034286 *Jul 31, 2012Feb 6, 2014Abb Inc.Self-aligning plug for positioning a temperature sensor within a transformer winding
US20150240511 *Apr 20, 2015Aug 27, 2015Acronimus Technology, S.L.Kit for mounting one or more appliances on a pole
EP0957218A3 *May 13, 1999Oct 4, 2000Musco CorporationSpacer between pole and cross-arm
WO1998000615A1 *Jun 26, 1997Jan 8, 1998Advanced Metals Technology Corp.Improved power transmission support structures
WO1999047771A1 *Mar 10, 1999Sep 23, 1999Siemens AktiengesellschaftDevice for introducing or transmitting forces and/or bending moments into the bar of a bar-type supporting frame and bar-type supporting frame having such a device
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/843, 174/45.00R, 52/848
International ClassificationE04H12/24, E04H12/08, E04H12/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04H12/08, E04H12/24
European ClassificationE04H12/08