Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2066516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1937
Filing dateApr 14, 1933
Priority dateApr 14, 1933
Publication numberUS 2066516 A, US 2066516A, US-A-2066516, US2066516 A, US2066516A
InventorsKenly C Bugg
Original AssigneeKenly C Bugg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package and method of producing the same
US 2066516 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1937'. K. c. BUGG v PACKAGE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Filed April 14, 1933 hy e/776A Patented Jan. 5, 1907 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE memes AND METHOD or PRODUCING THE SAME Kenly 0. Bugs, Farmington, Mo. Application April 14, 1933, Serial No. 666,157

3Claims.

This invention relates to a package and a method producingthe' same, such a package being peculiarly adapted for articles such as golf balls.

An object of the invention is to produce a package which will preserve the article to bepacked,

which will be inexpensive to .produce, and which will be readily removable.

Another object of the invention is to provide a method of packing to secure the above results,

and more particularly which will utilize parailln, or its equivalent, as a coating to hermetically seal the article and to entrap within the seal a film of water to keep the article moist.

Other and specific objects will be apparent from the following detail description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a golf ball to be packed in the preliminary step of the process.

Fig. 2 is a perspective of the package.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on line 3-3, Fig. 2.

In the drawing, a golf ball is taken as an example of the article to be packed, although it is to be understood that the process and the package are not limited to such an article but that 26 the same is taken merely as a convenient example and as illustrating a type of article for which the package and method are particularly adapted.

An article such as a golf ball I is dipped in a soap solution, which leaves a film 2 about the article. While the film is still liquid and in place, the article with the film adhering thereto, is

V dipped in melted paraflin and then withdrawn,

leaving a coating 3: which hardens about the article.

The object in providing the film 2 is to produce a uniform layer of liquid about the article to keep the article moist and to prevent the, outside coating from sticking to the article. It is impracticable to use hydrant water because of the surface tension, but the addition of soap to the water reduces this surface tension so that a thin film may be obtained. It will be apparent, of

course, that equivalents of a soap solution may be i used but such material is cheap and admirably serves the purpose.

I have specified the use of paraffin for the purpose of forming the outer coating but it will also be apparent that equivalents may be used. Such material should be wax-like and should melt at a comparatively low temperature while remaining ,solid at atmospheric temperature. I

In the drawing there is illustrated a tape or ribbon 4 partially encircling the article. One object ofthis ribbon is to provide means for dipping the article. This ribbon also performs an additional function. The ends may be trimmed, leaving only a small portion extruding through the coating, as shown in Fig. 2, and when the article is to be unpacked an extruding end of the ribbon may be pulled and the coating will be easi- 5 ly and completely removed from the article.

In actual practice, two, three or perhaps more clippings in paraflin may be required to give the coating desired thickness. Two or three dippings will give a coating of substantial thickness and 10 sufficient to make it self-sustaining, which is necessary because it does not adhere or stick to the article. For some purposes it may be desirable to further treat the package by dipping in varnish or liquid to give a hard surface to the 15 able in the case of rubber articles where loss of moisture and exposure to the air causes rapid 25 deterioration. The formation of the coating of paraflin, or its equivalent, about the article with a film of water interposed between the article and the paraffin prevents the coating from stick ing to the article and permits its ready removal.

. It will be obvious that parts of the invention may be used without the whole, that improvements may be made therein, and that various changes may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit 5 of this invention.

I claim: I

L'The method of preparing an article including dipping the article in a wetting agent to produce a continuous film thereof surrounding the 4 article, then while the said film is liquid and in place dipping the article in a body of melted waxlike material of a temperature insufiicient to evaporate the liquid film, removing the article and permitting the hardening of such material as 5 attaches to the article to form a protective seal entirely surrounding the article spaced therefrom and which can be removed readily when the article is to be used. i

2. The method of preparing an article includ- 50 ingdipping the article in a soap solution to produce an aqueous film surrounding the article, then while the said film is liquid and in place dipping the article in a body of melted wax-like material of a temperature insufiicient to evaporate the liquid mm, removing the article, and permitting the hardening of such wax-like material as attaches to the article to form a protective seal entirely surrounding the article which can be removed readily when the article is to be used.

3. The method of preparing an article including dipping the article in a wetting agent to pmduce a continuous fllrn thereof surrounding the article, then while the said mm is liquid and in place dipping the article in a body 01' melted parmm or a temperature insumcient to evaporate the liquid film, removing the article, and permitting the hardening of such material as attaches to the article to form a protective seal of the waxlike material entirely surrounding the article which can be removed readily when the article is to be used.

KINLY C. BUGG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2525358 *Jul 2, 1946Oct 10, 1950Jenett Caroline Louise MariaSelf-sealed package and method of producing
US2539513 *Jul 20, 1946Jan 30, 1951Jenett Caroline Louise MariaMethod of packaging
US3227456 *Dec 15, 1961Jan 4, 1966Eric O SonnemanGolf ball coated with a surface active chemical agent
US3252308 *Sep 9, 1963May 24, 1966Ronson CorpGas candles and the like
US6021896 *Jul 7, 1998Feb 8, 2000Marshall; James S.Reusable flexible container
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/154, 422/40, 206/315.9, 473/378
Cooperative ClassificationC03C17/32