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Publication numberUS2067328 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1937
Filing dateFeb 20, 1936
Priority dateFeb 20, 1936
Publication numberUS 2067328 A, US 2067328A, US-A-2067328, US2067328 A, US2067328A
InventorsLux Robert A
Original AssigneeLee A Lux
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid treating means
US 2067328 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12, 1937 R. A. LUX

LIQUID TREATING'MEANS Filed Feb. 20, 1936 ATTRNEYJ.

Panama Jan. 12, 1987 LIQUID TREATING MEANS Robert A. Lux, Lakewood, Ohio, assignor of onehalf to Lee A. Lux, Lakewood, Ohio Application February 20, 1938, Serial No. 64,898

Claims. (Cl. 210-38) This invention relates, generally, to a method of and means for treating liquid. In a more limited aspect it has to do with apparatus for introducing a water treating or softening substance or agent into water supply systems of homes, hotels, laundries, public buildings, etc., the size or capacity of the apparatus being determined by the extent and demands of the system.

The primary purpose of the invention is to provide an exceedingly simple and correspondingly inexpensive liquid treating apparatus that may be quickly and conveniently installed in a water supply system with but slight interruption of service, and that will reliably and automatically feed into the stream of water in proper proportion to the volume of the fiow a suitable softening agent or other treating substance.

Another object is to provide a very compact liquid treating apparatus that will emciently meet the demands of any systems wherewith it is designed for use and will require no attention on the part of the user except at very infrequent intervals when it becomes necessary to replenish the supply of treating substance.

Another object of the invention is to minimize the trouble and the time required in servicing the apparatus by providing a readily removable container or so-called cartridge or package for the treating substance which when exhausted may be conveniently replaced by one containing a fresh supply.

A still further object of the invention is to combine with such a container, cartridge or package, a treating substance that is solid at ordinary temperatures and the major area of whose body is bonded or is in such intimate contact with the body supporting Walls of the container as to exclude -liquid from between said walls and the body. This may be accomplished by introducing the treating substance when molten or soft into the container and allowing it to solidify or harden therein. Preferably, this end is accomplished by molding the substance in the container. A very practical advantage of this is that a replacement package or cartridge may be handled freely without danger of spilling its contents. A more important advantage, however, liesin the fact that the liquid has access only to the minor area or exposed surface of the body of the treating substance-that surface which is out of contact with the walls of the container, and the area whereof, according to my preferred design, is substantially constant. This avoids overcharging of the liquid and waste of the material, notwithstanding the employment of a substance possessing an almost ers hereinafter appearing, are attained in the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawing accompanying and forming a part of this specification and wherein Fig. 1 is an elevational view of my improved liquid treating apparatus attached to a water pipe, the latter being shown in transverse section; Fig. 2 is a central vertical section through the pipe and apparatus in a plane at right angles to that of` Fig. 1 and on a larger scale, and Fig. 3 is a central Vertical section through the upper portion of the apparatus at right angles to the plane of and on the same scale as Fig. 2 and including an additional feature.

While my invention is thoroughly adapted to the treating of cold water or other liquids, when the apparatus is to be employed for administering or dispensing a water softening agent, I recommend, for the sake of economy to the user, installation on a horizontal part of the cold water supply pipe of the hot water tank or range boiler. Such a location of the apparatus is preferred because of the desirability of treating only the hot water since it is used almost exclusively for Washing and bathing purposes. Also it is preferred that the apparatus be suspended from beneath the pipe, although it may be satisfactoriiy employed in inverted position above the pipe, or in a horizontal position, as when attached to a vertical pipe. The preference for the first described position resides in the fact that the water treating substance is considerably heavier than water. Therefore it and the saturated solution will be prevented by gravity from entering the system until positively displaced by water admitted to the container, as will hereinafter more fully appear.

In the drawing, the pipe to which the apparatus is attached is designated A, and the only operation necessary, preparatory to installing the apparatus, is the drilling of a hole a in the side of the pipe, preferably the underside of a horizontal branch. w

The apparatus includes a fitting I, and the top thereof, as the parts are viewed in the drawlng, is fornied with a semi-cylindrical recess 2. Lugs 3 extend laterally from the fitting o n opposite sides of said recess 2 and the same are provided with holes 4. The end of the fitting opposite the recess 2 is formed with a threaded boss 5 surrounded by a seat or shoulder 6 to which a gasket 'I -is applied, the gasket being of rubber or other suitable composition or material. The fitting terminates beyond the' boss 5 in a reduced, substantially central extension 8. An axial passageway I0 leads from one end to the other of the fitting and at its upper end is counterbored for the reception of one end of an angle, or socalled Pitot, tube. I I, said tube being rigidly' fastened to the fitting. Bisecting the passageway I0 a suitable distance below and parallel with the axis of the semi-cylindrical recess 2 is a valve bore I5 that opens through one side of the fitting where it is enlarged and threaded; and occupying said bore is a valve I'I, provided with a collar I0 and, beyond said collar, with a stem I9 that terminates in a wrench or handle receiving part 20. A gland nut 2| surrounds the stem I9and is threaded into the enlarged end of the bore |5, and between the inner end of the same and one side of the collar I8 is awasher 22 of packing material, a similar washer 23 being compressed between the opposite side of the collar and the shoulder that is formed between the parts of the bore of different diameters. The valve I'I has a port 25 extending diametrically therethrough in the plane of the passageway I0 and the same is adapted to be brought into and out of register with said passageway when the valve is turned by means of an Operating handle 26 that is removably applied to the part 20 of the valve stem. Incidentally the Operating handle incorporates a bifurcated head 21, thus constituting of said handle a wrench by which the gland nut 2| may be turned. The end of the Operating handle remote from the head 2l' is formed with an index finger 28 associated with suitable markings 29 on the adjacent 'face of the fitting I to indicate the position of the valve.

Applied to the bottom of the semi-cylindrical recess 2 in substantially concentric relation to the adjacent end of the Pitot tube II is a gasket 30 of lead or other appropriate material, preferably held in place by suitable means. Extending longitudinally through the fitting I, alongside the passageway I0, is a' second passageway 32, the same opening at one end into the enclosure of the gasket 30 and at the other through the end of the boss 5 alongside the extension 8.,

In applying the fitting to the pipe, the Pitot tube I I is projected through the hole a with the open end of the Pitot tube preferably pointed in the direction from which the water fiows, the direction of flow being indicated by the arrow in Fig. 2. Thegasket 30 is seated against the pipe in approximate concentric relation to the hole a. A cap 35 is then applied to the side of the pipe opposite the fitting I and bolts 36 are extended through holes 3'I in laterally extending lugs 38 of the cap and projected through the holes 4 of the lugs 3 on the fitting I. Nuts 39 are screwed onto the threaded ends of the bolts and by means thereof the parts are drawn together so as to compress the gasket 30 and effectively seal the joint between the pipe and the fitting I against leakage. The bolts 36 are preferably of the. carriage type in which case the holes 31 are made square to fit the usual squared portions of the' shanks of the bolts. It will be seeni from what has been said thus far that the only tools needed to make an installation are a drill and wrench, and with reasonable dexterity the job should be performed in a few minutes.

40 is a container which, as here used, may be properly termed a package or cartridge inasmuch as it is replaced by a full one when it becomes empty. At one end the container has an internally threaded fianged opening 4I for application to the threaded boss 5 of the fitting I. When the container is screwed into place, the gasket 'I seals the joint between it and the fitting. A body 44 of water treating substance Originally fills the container 40 to within a short distance of the end having the opening 4|, so that, when the container is applied to the fitting, the extension 8 is but a short distance from the adjacent end of the body. This leaves a space beyond the end of the body through which water may circulate when the apparatus is placed in use. It is important that, fexcepting for the part exposed to the water, the surface of the body be in intimate contact with the walls ofl the container so as to prevent the water reaching any but said exposed part. This is-'preferably accomplished by pouring the treating substance when in molten conditioninto thecontainer and then allowing it to chill and solidify or harden, in which case the body of the treating substance becomes bonded to the wallsof the container.

' With the apparatus installed and the regulating valve I'I opened to the extent desired, every time water is withdrawn from the system and a 'flow is thus created through the pipe A in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 2, a small part of the water will enter the container 40 through the Pitot tube II and passageway I0 and displace a like q'uantity of the saturated solution, causing it to flow out through the passageway 32 and join the water flowing through the pipe A, thus treating it.

The treating substance, examples of which are given hereinafter, is highly concentrated and very slightly soluble. 'Howeven to an almost negligible depth within the limited area exposed, the substance responds quickly to the action of the water, causing the water to immediately become charged with the treatment to the saturation point. Having reached such a point, there is no further demand until a fresh supply of water enters the containen; and consequently prolonged exposureof the substance to the saturated solution has no diluting or softening effect upon the body. In view of this phenomenon, the action of the treatment on the water is uniform so long as any treatment remains in the receptacle.

To avoid the possibility of any water circulating through the container without proper diffusion and consequent assurance of receiving its full charge of treatment, especially when the exposed surface of the body of treating substance recedes to a low level, I may attach a fiexible tube 45 of rubber or the like to the extension 8, as shown in Fig. 3, which will serve to positively carry the water down into close proximity to the body of treating substance. The tube when extended may be long enough to nearly' reach the bottom of the container, but as long as an appreciable amount of treating substance remains, the lower portion of the tube will lie thereon.

The fact that the package or cartridge has but a single connection with the fitting, makes its replacement very convenient. In such replacement, as in the original installation, the

supply of water to the pipe A is shut ofi and a 75 faucet momentarily' opened to relieve pressure in the system.

While I do not wish to be limited to any particular water treating compound, I may state that various compositions and mixtures well known in the art as suitable for water softening may be employed. For example, I may employ a composition including one or more such compounds as caustic soda, soda ash, sodium bicarbonate, trisodium phosphate, sodium aluminate, tannic acid, calcium hydroxide, bentonite, kaolin and the like. A substance holding loosely bound chlorine may also be added, such as for example, a non-toxic water soluble per compound of chlorine. In general, any of the water treating agents capable of adhering to or bonding with a container wall either when solidifying from a melt or when hardening from a plastic state may be employed. The composition may vary according to the nature of the water to be treated and the various combinations and proportions may be selectedjby any person skilled in the art. By the term slightly soluble", used herein to describe the water treating substance, is meant that said substance is of such character that only a very smallamount of it can be dissolved by the quantity of. water present in the container at any one time, but to that extent it dissolves quickly.

While' I have disclosed the essential features of my invention and iilustrated the same by particular examples, I wish it understood that I am limited only in accordance with the scope of the appended claims and the prior art.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In combination with a. liquid conveying pipe having a hole in the side, a fitting connected to the pipe over said hole and being 'designed to receive a container, a container connected to the fitting, the fitting having inlet and outlet passageways through which, and said hole, the interiors of the pipe and container communicate, a solid body of liquid treating substance within the container and spaced from the region of the connection between the container and fitting, and an extensible conduit connected at one end to the fitting in communication with one of said passageways thereof while its opposite end bears upon the body of liquid treating substance.

2. In combination with a liquid conveying pipe having a hole in its side, a fitting having a semicylindrical recess at one end for application to the pipe over the hole and including a threaded boss adjacent its opposite end, the fitting ter--- minating beyond said boss 'in an extension, there being inlet and outlet passageways extending longitudinallyithrough the fitting and opening at one end into the aforesaid recess, the passageways at their opposite ends opening one through the end of the extension and the other through the end of the boss, a container having a threaded opening for application to said boss like water system through which fresh water is supplied to said system, a container communcatively connected thereto in such manner as to effect the by-passing of a part of the flow through the container, and a solid liquid-impervious body of slightly soluble water treating substance molded into the container so that all but a limited portion of its surface is in such intimate contact with the walls of the container as to preclude access of water thereto.

4. In combination with a pipe of a domestic or like water system through which fresh water is supplied to said system, said pipe having a circular hole in its side, a fitting having one end formed for application to said pipe and its opposite end designed to receive a container, the fitting having inlet and outlet passageways that open through each of its ends,a gasket interposed between the fitting and pipe and having an opening surrounding the hole in the latter and encompassing the passageways of the former, a container detachably connected to the fitting and having but a single restricted opening, said opening embracing both passageways, means inducing a by-passing of a part of the flow through the container, and a solid liquid impervious body of siightly soluble water treating substance molded into the container so that all but a limited portion of it-s surface is in such intimate contact with the walls of the container as to preclude access of water thereto.

-5. In combination with a pipe of a domestic or like water system through which fresh water is supplied to said system, said pipe having a circular hole in its side, a fitting having one end formed for application to said pipe and its opposite end designed to receive a container, the fitting having inlet and outlet passageways that open through each of its ends, a gasket interposed between the fitting and pipe and having an opening surrounding the hole in the latte. and encompassing the passageways of the former, a Pitot tube connected to thev fitting in communication with one of said passageways and extending through the hole in the pipe, a container detachably connected to the fitting and having but a single restricted opening, said opening embracing both passageways, and a solid liquid-impervious body of slightly soluble water treating substance molded into the container so that all but a limited portion of its surface is in such intimate contact with the walls of the container as to preclude access of Water thereto.

ROBERT A. LUX.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2532973 *Feb 25, 1948Dec 5, 1950Wallentin Ake HenningApparatus for proportioning metaphosphate to a liquid
US2805923 *Dec 7, 1953Sep 10, 1957Billings Clayton HApparatus for chemically treating water
US3060456 *Jun 9, 1959Oct 30, 1962Donald ColvinDetergent dispenser for flush valve fixtures
US3266870 *Aug 15, 1963Aug 16, 1966Stiles Kem Sales CorpBypass chemical dissolver with slantedslot jet agitators
US3340888 *Jul 21, 1965Sep 12, 1967Grace W R & CoChemical feeder
US3352486 *Apr 30, 1965Nov 14, 1967Clay Adams IncApparatus for washing particle matter
US3373756 *Jun 28, 1966Mar 19, 1968Garratt Callahan CompanyApparatus and method for feeding chemicals into liquid systems
US4465471 *Jul 26, 1982Aug 14, 1984Eli Lilly And CompanyIntravenous administration system for dry medicine
US5404594 *Apr 5, 1993Apr 11, 1995Ring; Russel F.To be connected to a water supply tube
US20130056558 *Sep 26, 2011Mar 7, 2013Strong Fortress Tool Co., Ltd.Spraying device
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/263, 4/226.1, 422/264, 422/282, 239/344
International ClassificationC02F1/68
Cooperative ClassificationC02F1/686
European ClassificationC02F1/68P2