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Publication numberUS2068262 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1937
Filing dateOct 26, 1934
Priority dateOct 26, 1934
Publication numberUS 2068262 A, US 2068262A, US-A-2068262, US2068262 A, US2068262A
InventorsRaymond W Brown
Original AssigneeRaymond W Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loose leaf book
US 2068262 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. W. BROWN I LOOSE LEAF BOOK Jan. 19, 1937.

Filed Oct. 26, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l mmmz ImIu INVENTOR flag/mend W Brown BY mMfinW M ATTORNEY R. W. BROWN LOOSE LEAF BOOK Jan. 1 9, 193 7.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 26, 1934 INVENTOR flay/71mm MBMM? 93AM M ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 19, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICIE Application October 26,

Claims.

This invention relates to books such as customer account books, inventory books and the like and particularly to books of this character which are loose leaf and are of the so-called visible index 5 type.

In books of this type it has been the practice to arrange the sheets in groups the successive sheets of each group overlapping one another from top to bottom so as to leave the lower margin of each sheet exposed. A customers name or other identifying information is written on the lower margin and with the sheets arranged in this manner the names on the entire group of the sheets will be visible without the necessity of turning the sheets over.

One objection to books of this character is that, due to the overlapping, the group of sheets is much thicker at the part midway between the top and bottom, than at other parts. This defect is particularly noticeable When attempts are made to Write on the sheet because the surface of the sheet is not fiat but is rounded up toward the center. In fact, this objectionable feature necessarily limits the number of sheets which can conveniently be employed in a single binder.

One object of my invention is to avoid this objectionable feature by providing division sheets between the successive groups; these division sheets being provided with flanges along their edges so that when the book is opened to any one group of sheets, the top and bottom portions of this group will be lifted or held about above the corresponding portions of sheets of the groups lying below.

In one form of my invention the flanges of the division sheets are arranged outside the group of sheets thus forming in effect a shallow box in which the group of sheets lies. In another form of my invention, the flanges lie in contact with the edges of the group and are suitably tapered to compensate for the varying thickness of the groups below. I preferably cut away the inner portion of the division sheet midway between the top and bottom as I find it facilitates the insertion and removal of the sheets.

By the employment of this feature of my invention not only can the book be more easily used, but the capacity of the binder is greatly increased.

A further object of my invention is to provide a sheet with spaces on opposite sides for recording information and which is perforated adjacent opposite edges so the sheetmay be inserted in the binder with either edge engaged by the binder 55 pron-g; and a still further object of my invention 1934, Serial No. 750,226

is to arrange each group of sheets as two subgroups with the overlapping sheets of one subgroup facing the overlapping sheets of the other group. Thus when the group is opened at its center the identifying information of all the 5 sheets of both sub-groups will be visible. This permits a maximum number of sheets to be inspected at a glance.

A further object of my invention is to provide between the sub-groups of sheets atransparent sheet which I will term a lifting sheet and which is provided with a tab to be taken hold of to open the group of sheets at its center. The lifting sheet may be of transparent celluloid or other flexible material which will not obstruct the view of either side of the open book. The lifting sheet need not be of the same area as the group of sheets, it being necessary merely that it be of sufficient area that when it is raised it will lift all of the overlapping sheets of the sub-group. By making the lifting sheet of proper width, and placing the tab in one corner of the lifting sheet, I may use identical lifting sheets for all the groups of sheets in the book and insert each lifting sheet in the binder so that its tab will be located at any desired point from top to bottom of the book. This is of particular advantage when the tab is to receive index markings and it is desired to arrange the tabs so that they all will be visible.

A further object is to provide means to facilitate the opening of the book at any desired place. A bookof this character often contains many hundreds of pages, a great number of index tabs are employed and the tabs, if they are all to be visible, are necessarily small in area and do not provide sufiicient space adequately to display index markings. To remedy this, it has been suggested that the index markings be placed on the inside of the covers of the book immediately below the corresponding tab. Thus if a tab opens a book at a page containing names beginning with BER the indication BER. will be printed adjacent the outer edge of the inside of the covers at the same distance, as the tab, from top'of the book. However, when the tabs are numerous and close together and particularly if the book is thick, it is often difficult to judge which of a number of adjacent tabs is the tab corresponding to a given index marking. In order to remedy this, I impart to the tab and to thecorresponding part of the cover, which carries the marking some characteristic which serves to distinguish the tab from the adjacent tabs. Thus. for example, I may mark alternate tabs with a star or other geometrical figure and mark the corresponding places on the cover with the same figures. I find, however, that colors are the most readily discernible characteristic. Thus I may color successive tabs red, yellow, blue and green, repeating this sequence from top to bottom of the book and place the same colors at the corresponding points of the cover.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a book embodying one form of my invention, the book being open at the center of one of the groups of sheets contained therein;

Figure 2 is an end elevation of the construction shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a detail perspective view of the inner portion of one of the division sheets with a number of overlapping sheets of one group lying thereon; the sheets being out along a line from top to bottom to better illustrate the manner of applying the flanges to the division sheets;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of one of the division sheets;

Figure 5 is a detail sectional view taken through the flanges on opposite sides of the division sheet;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of a modified form of division sheet showing tapered flanges;

Figure '7 is a perspective view of a modified form of division sheet formed of transparent material; and

Figure 8 is a detail of one of the pockets at the outer margin of the cover of the binder, for containing the index cards.

Referring more particularly to Figures 1 and 2, the book comprises a loose leaf binder I0 having covers II and suitable prongs I2 adapted to be inserted through the leaves of the book for securing leaves therein. Any suitable mechanism, not shown, may be used for operating the prongs, or rings.

The book comprises groups I5 of sheets I 6, the groups being divided into two sub-groups I1 and I8 which when the group is opened at the center as is illustrated in Figure 1, appear respectively at opposite sides of the book, the several sheets I6 of the sub-groups I! and I8 facing upward. The sheets I6 as may be seen are arranged from top to bottom of the book, the lower marginal portions I9 of all of the sheets being visible and these lower marginal portions are marked with names, such as customer's names or otheridentifying information as to the subject of the sheet.

The remainder of the sheet is ruled to receive desired information, thus in the form of sheet illustrated the names at the lower margins may be purchasers of a particular make of automobile and the data on the remainder of the sheet, that pertaining to the inspection by the company of the car sold to the customer, its condition at various dates, etc. The back of the sheets I6 are similarly printed from the top edge down with the lower margin having a space for the same name or identifying information and both side margins of the sheet are perforated so that when one side of the sheet is completely filled in it may be taken out of the binder and reversed with the prongs extending through the other row of perforations. By this construction, it will be seen that printing is always right side up Whether the sheet be turned over while it remains in the binder or taken out of the binder and re-i'nserted from the opposite edge.

To facilitate the opening of the book at the middle of any desired group of sheets, I preferably employ a transparent sheet 20 of celluloid or similar material provided at one corner with a tab 2|. As will be seen the transparent sheet 20 has a width from topto bottom slightly greater than the distance from the bottom of the top sheet I6 to the bottom of the group of sheets I6 and it is provided with a perforated hinge at 22 so that it may be inserted in the binder. In any position of this sheet in the binder, it should extend up onto the top sheet I6 in order that it will lift the entire sub-group of sheets. The tab 2 I may be positioned wherever desired by properly positioning the sheet 26 in the binder. Thus, all of the lower positions from top to bottom of the book may be covered with a tab at the lower corner of the sheet 26 and by taking the sheet 20 out of the binder and reversing it, so that the tab is in the upper corner, the upper positions may be covered.

Between each group of sheets, I provide a division sheet 25 which is formed with an outer flange 26 which for flexibility may conveniently be formed of rubber and may be held in place by adhesive tape 21. The tape 21 is preferably interrupted at 29 along the portions where the sheet bends as the book is opened to increase the flexibility of the flange. The inner margins of the division sheet 25 at top and bottom are provided with perforations for insertion in the binder and the midportion is cut away as indicated at 30. The flange as it extends along the inner edge is tapered along the center as indicated at 3|, thus compensating for the differences of thickness of the group of sheets.

In the form of division sheet shown in Figure 4, the entire group of sheets I6 between. successive division sheets lie entirely within the flanges 26, while in the form of sheet shown in Figure 6, the sheet I6 rests upon the two tapered flanges 32. These flanges may be formed of wood and as will be seen taper from top to bottom towards the center of the sheet and also terminate at 34 at the top and bottom somewhat short of the inner edge of the sheet so as to permit the sheet to be flexed. At the inner edge of the sheet shown in Figure 6 is a stiffening bead or flange 36 located inwardly of the perforations 29.

In Figure 7, I show a division sheet 31 similar in construction to that shown in Figure 4 except that it is formed of celluloid and is thus transparent and this sheet is provided with a tab 2I located at one corner. Such division sheets leave also the function of lifting sheets and are located at the center of the group of sheets I 6 and thus eliminating the necessity of employing other division sheets.

Referring more particularly to Figures 1 and 8, the outer margins of the covers II or the fly leaves of the binder inside the cover are provided with elongated pockets 4!! which are formed of transparent material sewed or otherwise secured to the cover along their outer edges leaving the inner edge II free and into this pocket may be inserted cards 42 bearing index letters 44 and adjacent thereto colored spots 45. The tab corresponding to each index indication has the same color as the spot 45.

Having now described my invention, what I claim and desire tosecure 'by Letters Patent is:

1. A book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between the groups, each division sheet having upstanding rims extending along the top, bottom and front edges with a vacant space between and forming a receptacle for containing the sheets of agroup.

2. A book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between the groups, each division sheet having upstanding rims extending along the top, bottom and front edges and forming a receptacle for containing the sheets of a group, said rims being flexible at the top and bottom adjacent the back of the sheet and stiff at other parts.

3. A book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between the groups, each division sheet having upstanding rims along the front, top and bottom edges and forming in effect a shallow box in which the group of sheets is contained and having two upstanding rims extending along the inner edge from the top and bottom respectively and each of gradually decreasing height, said last named rims serving to support the inner edge of the group and compensating for the varying thickness of the group.

4. A book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between the groups, each division sheet having upstanding rims along the front, top and bottom edges and forming in effect a shallow box in which the group of sheets is contained and having two upstanding rims extending along the inner edge from the top and bottom respectively and each of gradually decreasing height, said last named rims serving to sup-port the inner edge of the group and compensating for the varying thickness of the group, said division sheet between the inner ends of said last named rims being cut away for a distance at least equal to one eighth of the width of the division sheet.

5. A loose leaf book comprising a binder cover with prongs securing sheets therein, said sheets being arranged in groups with successive sheets of each group overlapping each other from top to bottom, division sheets between successive groups, the division sheets being formed with upstanding rims for spacing the upper and lower portions of the group held therebetween being spaced from the corresponding portions of the. other groups and the division sheets being cut away from the inner edges along portions midway between the top and bottom and for a distance equal at least to one eighth of the width of the division sheet.

6. A loose leaf book comprising a binder cover with prongs securing sheets therein, said sheets being arranged in groups and each group being formed of two sub-groups, the sheets of the subgroup overlapping from top to bottom to provide projecting margins for receiving identifying markings and the sheets of one group facing the sheets of the other group whereby when the group of sheets is opened at the center, all projecting margins of the group are visible and each sheet being punched adjacent both the front and rear edges whereby it is adapted to be secured in the binder so as to form part of either sub-group and a transparent sheet between the sub-groups, said last named sheet having a projecting tab.

'7. A loose leaf book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between groups, each division sheet having two upstanding rims extending along the inner edge from top to bottom respectively and each of gradually decreasing height, said rims serving to support the inner edge of the group and compensating for the varying thickness of the group and said sheet having a row of perforations to adapt the sheet for insertion in the binder, said row of perforations being located adjacent the rims and the rims extending between the perforations and the extreme inner edge of the sheet.

8. A book having groups of sheets overlapping one another from top to bottom, division sheets between successive groups, said division sheets being each cut away from the back edge approximately midway between the top and bottom, the cut away portion extending inwardly of the sheet for a distance at least to one eighth of the width of the sheet.

9. A loose leaf book comprising a binder cover with prongs for securing record sheets therein, said sheets being arranged in groups and each group being formed of two sub-groups, the sheets of the sub-group overlapping from top to bottom to provide projecting margins for receiving identifying marking and the sheets of one group facing the sheets of the other group whereby when the group of sheets are opened at the center, all projecting margins of the group are visible and each sheet being punched adjacent both the front and rear edge whereby it is adapted to be secured in the binder so as to form part of either sub-group and stiff division sheets between successive groups and flexible lifter sheets between the two sub-groups of each group and means for lifting said lifter sheet, said means projecting outwardly from the outer edge of the group of sheets.

10. A loose leaf book comprising a binder cover with prongs for securing record sheets therein, said sheets being arranged in groups and each group being formed of two sub-groups, the sheets of the sub-groups overlapping from top to bottom to provide projecting margins for receiving identifying marking and the sheets of one group facing the sheets of the other group whereby when the group of sheets are opened at the center, all projecting margins of the group are visible and each sheet being punched adjacent both the front and rear edge whereby it is adapted to be secured in the binder so as to form part of either sub-group, division sheets between successive groups and transparent lifter sheets between the two sub-groups of each group and projecting tabs and lifting sheets, said tabs projecting outwardly from the outer edge of the group of sheets, said division sheets being of greater area than the group of sheets and said lifter sheet being of a lesser dimension from top to bottom than the division sheet.

11. A loose leaf book comprising a binder cover with prongs for securing record sheets therein, said sheets being arranged in groups and each group being formed of two sub-groups, the sheets of the sub-group overlapping from top to bottom to provide projecting margins for receiving marking and the sheets of one group facing the sheets of the other group whereby when the group of sheets are opened at the center, all projecting margins of the group are visible and each sheet being punched adjacent both the front and rear edge whereby it is adapted to be secured in the binder so as to form part of either sub-group and a transparent sheet between the sub-groups, division sheets between successive groups and lifter sheets between the on the division and lifting sheets, and means for lifting said lifter sheet, said means projecting outwardly from the outer edge of the group of sheets, and of lesser dimension from back to front than the record sheet.

12. A loose leaf book having prongs for the insertion of sheets and having groups of sheets held by said prongs, the sheets of the group overlapping one another from top to bottom, leaving exposed margins, division sheets between the groups having projecting portions for lifting the groups in opening the book, said division sheets extending from top to bottom of the book, said groups being divided into sub-groups facing one another, a flexible lifter sheet between adjacent sub-groups, said lifter sheet being of substantially less width than the corresponding dimension of the book and of sufiicient width to cover a plurality of exposed margins of the sheets of a sub-group, said lifter sheet having a projecting tab adjacent one outer corner and said lifter sheets having spaced openings for receiving said prongs whereby said lifter sheet is adapted for insertion into the book with the tab located at substantially any position within a wide range from top to bottom of the book.

13. A loose leaf book having prongs for the insertion of sheets and having groups of sheets held by said prongs, the sheets of the group overlapping one another from top to bottom leaving exposed margins, division sheets between the groups having projecting portions for lifting the groups in opening the book, said division sheets extending from top to bottom of the book, said groups being divided into sub-groups facing one another, a flexible substantially rectangular lifter sheet between adjacent sub-groups, said lifter sheet being of substantially less width than the corresponding dimension of the book and of suflicient width to cover a plurality of exposed margins of the sheets of a sub-group, said lifter sheet having a projecting tab adjacent one outer corner and said lifter sheets having equally spaced openings for receiving said prongs whereby said lifter sheet is adapted for insertion into the book with the tab located at substantially any position within a wide range from top to bottom of the book.

14. A loose leaf book having prongs for the insertion of sheets and having groups of sheets held by said prongs, the sheets of the group overlapping one another from top to bottom leaving exposed margins, division sheets between the groups having projecting portions for lifting the groups in opening the book, said division sheets extending from top to bottom of the book, said groups being divided into sub-groups facing one another, a flexible substantially rectangular lifter sheet between adjacent sub-groups, said lifter sheet being of substantially less width than the corresponding dimension of the book and of sufiicient width to cover all exposed margins of the sheets of a sub-group, said lifter sheet having a projecting tab adjacent one outer corner and said lifter sheets having equally spaced openings for receiving said prongs whereby said lifter sheet is adapted for insertion into the book with the tab located at substantially any position from top to bottom of the book.

15. A loose leaf book having prongs for the insertion of sheets and having groups of sheets held by said prongs, the sheets of the group overlapping one another from top to bottom, leaving exposed margins, division sheets between the groups having projecting portions for lifting the groups in opening the book, said division sheets extending from top to bottom of the book, said groups being divided into sub-groups facing one another, a flexible lifter sheet between adjacent subgroups, said lifter sheet being of substantially less width than the corresponding dimension of the book and of sufiicient width-to cover a plurality of exposed margins of the sheets of a subgroup, said lifter sheet having a projecting tab adjacent one outer corner and said lifter sheet having spaced openings for receiving said prongs, there being a greater number of said openings than prongs to be received therein at any one time, whereby said lifter sheet is adapted for insertion into the book with the tab located at any one of numerous positions between the top and bottom of the book.

RAYMOND W. BROWN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687902 *May 22, 1951Aug 31, 1954Becker Gerald LRecord book
US2852279 *Mar 10, 1954Sep 16, 1958Lee DrulardAppointment filing system
US3283760 *Mar 3, 1964Nov 8, 1966Yeager Ella EWork slip holder for teacher's use in classrooms
US3498640 *Apr 18, 1967Mar 3, 1970Russell Thomas HBookkeeping apparatus
US4573821 *Mar 8, 1985Mar 4, 1986Gilreath Charles TWindow index system for ring binders
US4575126 *May 18, 1983Mar 11, 1986Grubbs James BSpecial project workbook
US5921582 *May 15, 1998Jul 13, 1999Gusack; Mark DavidIndexing system, record structure, and linking methodology for paper-based and electronic-based informational assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/393, 40/401, 402/503
International ClassificationB42F5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F5/00, Y10S402/503
European ClassificationB42F5/00