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Publication numberUS2069422 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1937
Filing dateNov 23, 1933
Priority dateNov 23, 1933
Publication numberUS 2069422 A, US 2069422A, US-A-2069422, US2069422 A, US2069422A
InventorsRobert W Sampson
Original AssigneeCharles J Hardy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic mattress and the like
US 2069422 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1937.

R. w. sAMP's N PNEUMATIC MATTRESS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 25, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 In we 72,501:

Feb. 2, 1937. R. w. SAMPSON 2,069,422

PNEUMATIC MATTRESS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 23, 1953 4 Shets-Sheet 2 Feb. 2, 1937. R. w. SAMPSON 2,069,422

PNEUMATIC MATTRESS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 23, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Jnve 722301:-

Feb. 2, 1937. R. w. SAMPSON 6 PNEUMATIC MATTRESS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 25, 1935 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 2 2 a a m 3 M a e M. F 0 @u w 0 2 w M l -J. .w n u o 1 M 0 u u E Q n Y M 2 HHHHIH 1 Hun n n o m (lllllIlIlL a T l n m w n o o u w a F u w H H o v n o o o u v w 7 z m -i m a b m u of y T m i s m m Patented Feb. 2, 1937 FUNITEDFMQSTATES PNEUMATIC "mm'mzss Robert W. Sampson, New York, N. Y., assignm- I to Charles J. Hardy, New York, N. Y.

I Application November 23, 1933, Serial No. 899,328

' 7 Claims. (01. -348) My invention relates to mattresses, cushions and the like which embody a pneumatic element or elements in combinationwith textile and/or fibrous elements all of which may be assembled 5 in a-complete compositeunit.

-0bjects ofmy inventionare to give to the pneumatic element or-elements a configuration which will increase the ,efficiency thereof; to counteract any tendency toward undue local N yieldability in the pneumatic element, or the formation of objectionable depressions or elevations therein when in use; to increase' the efficiency of; the pneumatic element, and ofthe mattress'by .an improved method of assembling the pneumatic element between fiexible,'textile and/or, fibrous elements of diflerentqdegrees of softness or yieldability; to producers. reversible mattress which shall be of different degrees of softness on its opposite sides; to form. a mattress,

go embodying a plurality of pneumatic elements, which may be folded up compactly without doubling or bending a pneumatic element on itself. In the drawings, in each ,of thefigures of 5 which similar reference letters refer to similar I parts, Figure l is a perspective view of the improved pneumatic element, top up;--Figu re 2 is a perspective view of the same, bottom up; Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view, on an enlarged 30 scale, of one pneumatic element with its associ- I a plurality of diagonally disposed ribs or ridges a ated textile and fibrous topping and base, and

the covering, taken as on a line 33 of Figure 4,

which is a perspective view of a typical mattress,

bottom up, and with the foundation and cover 35 partially broken away, this view being on a reduced scale as compared with Figures 1 and 2; Figure 5 is a perspective view of a detail of a corner of the mattress, on a scale similar to that of Figures land 2; Figure 6 is a plan view of a a0 mattress adapted to fold up on itself; Figure '7 is a longitudinal view of the same taken aslocking up on Figure 6; Figure 8 is aplan view of an improved mattress support; Figure!) is an end view'of the same;,Figure-l0 is a longitudinal view 45 of a completemattress, mounted on the improved support which is shown as, a longitudinal section taken on the lin'e l0-l0 of Figure 8; and

,Figure 11 is an edge-view of a modifiedform of pneumatic element having a stiffened; marginal ,50 bead or rim, the upper right hand'corner being in section, better to showthe construction. This figure'is on the same scaleas Figure 3.. Figures 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 are on a reduced scale as compared with Figure 4.

. 55 Thetopping element l of the mattress is shown as composed of a fibrous body 2 of hair, vegetable fibre or the like, inclosed within va suitablecover 3, and adapted to yield locally, bothby compression and depression. when pressed from "above; l

. 5 The foundation or bottom element 4 iscomposed of a similaiz'but preferably less soft and yieldable, fibrous body 5, inclosed in a suitable casing 6, and is preferably less flexible and yieldable than the topping l. 10

Between the topping l and foundation I is in- V serted the pneumatic element or elements I; It is .7 desirable, especially for full length mattresses, to

use a plurality of these pneumatic elements, for

instance 3, as shown in Figure 4, both for faw cilitating manufacture, convenience of removal and replacement, and forv making the mattress r conveniently foldable as hereinafter pointedout.

Each of these elements ,1 is shown as consisting of a single, integral unit adapted to retain within it confined air, and having on what is normally its lower or under side a plurality of elongated chambers 8, 8, each provided with a plurality of arched recesses 9, 8, springing lengthwise thereof, and with a resulting,'plurality of protuberances l0, IILbetWeen and beyond the recesses, so that, when the element is laid with the chambers 8, 8 down, it will be supportedv by the protuberances "I, Hi.

The upper face of'the element I-is formed with II, I I, forming between themdepresslons I2, I 2,'

the-bottoms of which, when they crossv above the depressions between the elongated chambers 8, 8 are formed of a single thickness of material,

'pressions l3, l3, those partsof the bottomsof the respectivedepressions will lie against=each other and, when vulcanized,'wi1l coalesce in a single united thickness or layer. The perfora tions ll, it pass. through the coalesced layer 5 from side to side. I a

Where the ridged air chambers II, II cross theelongated chambers 8, 8, they open into each other, so that inclosed air may move to and frothrough all of them and may be displaced by pressure from one area and made to increase the air pressure at other points.

By disposing the upper air channels diagonally of the lower ones a material improvement is obtained in the functioning of the air container in use as a mattress or cushion element, in comparison with a construction in which the upper and lower air chambers are disposed at right angles to each other; for tendency of the container to bend or buckle along right lines is counteracted, and more uniform support for such a load as the human body is obtained. For instance, if a user lies extended, from end to end of a container having top and bottom air chambers disposed at right angles to each other, the lower limbs, being parallel to the lower air chamhers, will tend to bed down between them, or to be carried by the chamber or chambers substantially adjacent to or parallel with them, the upper chambers pressing down, only to the extent of their breadth, against the lower chambers. But where a diagonal disposition of the upper chamhers is adopted the pressure of each upper chamber will be spread over a greater area of the lower chamber, and a more uniform support for the load will result, without the loss of softness or resiliency; and the container will tend to retain an approximateLv flat disposition, with diminished liability to fold or buckle along right lines.

Furthermore, if in a sectional mattress, such as is shown in Figure 4, the diagonal chambers of one section slope in a different direction from those of the next one, for instance from right to. left. as shown in Figure 1, in one section, and

from left to right in an adjacent section, which may be accomplished by turning the second section end for end, a further diffusion of support will be obtained, and the carrying quality of the mattress will be further improved.

The 68171118 quality of the mattress is also improved by the placing of the pneumatic element between the topping I and the yielding foundation I. Because the comparatively soft topping affords a locally yielding carrier in which the more prominent irregularities of the human body may bed down before transmitting their arched portions of the chamber 8 are pressed down to that foundation. Thus an increasing resistance is built up out of the support of the protuberances, the carrying capacity of the arches and the gradual yielding of the foundation, all of which cooperate to produce an approximate uniformity T'of softly yielding support, particularly in combination with the diagonal top chambers and the soft topping as already described.

By turning the mattress over a firmer upper surface may be presented for use, if that is desired ment ll, thus permitting the insertion or removal at will of the inclosed elements of the mattress for airing, cleaning and repair. This arrangement also facilitates access to the pneumatic valves i1, H, for the proper regulation of the air in the elements 1, I.

If it is desired to fold the composite mattress, an arrangement may be adopted which will readily permit this by making the topping and foundation in sections similar in size to the pneumatic section and forming the cover ISA with several pockets for instance three, into each of which a topping, air container and foundation are inserted, the pockets being preferably joined to each other at their adjacent edges, alternately at top and bottom, as at l8, l9, so that one end section may be folded over and the other under the middle section; thus permitting the sections of the mattress to be folded flat-wise against each other.

Under certain conditions, for instance where the mattress is to be used to replace one supported by box springs, it is desirable to provide a suitable, convenient support for it. And such a support isshown in Figures 8, 9 and 10, wherein a flat top 20, of ply board or other suitable material, is carried by cross members 2|, 2|, stayed by edgings 22, 22. The top is is perforated, as at-23, 23, for the purpose of ventilation. Such a support may be placed within an ordinary bedstead frame, and will provide a suitable carrier for the mattress.

Proper ventilation is an important consideration in mattresses; as both for sanitation and comfort access of air to the interior of the mattress is desirable.

The construction of my improved mattress insures-adequate ventilation, not only through the topping I and foundation 4, but also through the perforations II, M, the depressions l2, II, the recesses 9, 9, and the spaces I3, it between the chambers 8, 8, all of which will be more or less open during both use' and disuse of the mattress and which will cooperate bellows-like to expel and draw in air through apertures 21, 21 in the casing as the mattress is subjected to varying pressures and modifications of form during use.

In Figure 11,1 have shown amodiflcation of the marginal rim or head of the pneumatic element, which is substantially thickened as compared, for instance, with the showing of Figure 3 of the drawings, and is preferably moulded so as to produce a flat top with an underside sloping downwardly and inwardly at an angle of about 45 degrees from the top. The result of this construction is to surround the pneumatic element with a comparatively stiff rim 2!, which will quite definitely support the cover or casing against deflection inwardly, and will materially assist in maintaining the proper contour of the mattress or cushion.

By means of my improvement I produce a mattress embodying the advantages of both an air confining element or elements and of textile and fibrous elements, the desirable characteristics of one element supplementing those of the others so as to result in a unitary assembly quite uniform in softness, yieldability and resilience, susceptible of being made harder or softer by varying the air control of the pneumatic element, automatically ventilates itself when in use, retaining its form without permanent distortion, and which may be conveniently folded upon itself if desired.

The particular embodiment of my invention which I have illustrated and described is to be taken as a typical and not on exclusive form; for

details may be varied, as by theme of equivalents, without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:-

1. A pneumatic mattress or cushion, composed of rubber or the like, embodying a' plurality of elongated air chambers projecting from one face and extending across the mattress, each provided on its outer face with a plurality of medial and terminal protuberances with arches springing longitudinally inwardly between them, in combination with a thickened, flexible, textile and fibrous foundation sufilciently resistant to substantially oppose the bedding down therein of the aforesaid protuberances, and a flexible, textile and fibrous topping, softer and thicker than the foundation, and disposed on the oppoute side of the air container from the foundation. 1'. v g 2. In a pneumatic mattress or cushiomthe coni-v face with a plurality of medial and terminal pro tuberances with arches springing longitudinally. inward between them, another plurality of inter-- communicating air chambers forming ridges projecting from the other face of the air container and disposed diagonally relative to the first mentioned chambers, a thickened, soft, textile topping resting against the diagonal chambers, and a.

thickened, but comparatively stiffer, flexible, textile foundation applied against the opposed series oi. chambers, and means for holding the storesaid elements in assembled relation.

3. A pneumatic mattress or cushion, composed of rubber or the like, embodying a plurality of elongated air chambers projecting'from one face and extending across the mattress and each provided on its outer face with a plurality of -medial and terminal protuberances with a plurality of arches springing longitudinally inwardly between them, and a plurality of intercommunicating air chambers projecting from its other face and disposed diagonally relative to the flrstmentioned chambers.

4. The combination in a mattress of a pneumatic core having a series of comparatively deep trough like depressions each extending from within one edge to within another edge of one face thereof, and another series of comparatively deep trough like depressions each extending across the opposite face of the core within its edges with their longitudinal axes ofl'set angularly from those of the first mentioned series, the bottoms of the opposed depressions being separated by comparatively thin integral webs, ventilating openings passing through said webs and forming channels interconnecting a plurality of said depressions, and a textile facing for each side of the core, the depth of the depressions being sufficient to prevent the textile facings from reaching their bottoms in the normal use of the mattress, whereby series of permanently free and. relatively crossed interconnected, ventilating channels are maintained in the opposed faces of the core.

5. The combination in a mattress of a pneumatic core having a series of trough like depressions with closed ends each extending from one edge to another of one face thereof, 'and another series of trough like depressions extending across the opposite face of the core with their longitudinal axes offset angularly from those of the first mentioned series, the opposed depressions at their points of crossing extending through the whole thickness of the core except that their bottoms at the points of crossing are separated by comparatively thin integral webs, ventilating openings passing through said webs and forming 1 ventilating channels interconnecting amultiplicity of said depressions, and a textile facing for each-sideoffthe core, the depressions being sum cintlfdeep and narrow to prevent the textile facings from reaching their bottoms in the nornial usef-of the mattress, whereby series of permainentiy-ffree and relatively crossed and interconve 'tilatingchannels are maintained in the opposed aces of the core. V

6. Thy'combizidtionin a mattress of a pneuone face'thereofitheendsiof the depressions be- I matic core haying aseries of elongated depres.- sions', with abrupt. sides each extending across ing closed by an integralrimf-having a continuous 1 and acute-angled. outer edge, and another series of elongated 'de'pressionsswith abrupt sides each extending across ,the opposite faceoffithe core with their longitudinal axes onset angularly from and crossing a plurality of the-first mentioned series of. depressions, the opppsed depression at their points of crossing -extendingz through .the

whole thickness of the core except thatitheirbpttoms atithe point of crossing are: separated by comparatively thin integral webs,- ventilating openings passing through said webs. mayeqnnecting each depression with a plurality. ofsop w posed depressions, anda textile facing for, each side of the core, the depressions being sufliciently v deep and narrow to prevent the textile facings from reaching the bottoms of the depressions in 1 the normal use of'the mattress, whereby series of permanently free and relatively crossed ventilating channels are maintained in the opposed faces of the core.

7. A new article of manufacture, a rectangular, pneumatic mattress or cushion core, having a series of trough like depressions extending across the bottom thereof, another series of r trough like depressions extending across the top thereof with their longitudinal axes angularly offset from those of the first mentioned series, and a comparatively stiff, but flexible, integral marginal rim having an outwardly extending, angular, upper edge surrounding the upper edge of the core in the plane of its top and closing the ends of the depressions in its top.

ROBERT W. SAMPSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2822554 *Jan 7, 1955Feb 11, 1958Ohio Commw Eng CoVariable density foam cushions, pillow and the like
US3114190 *Feb 5, 1962Dec 17, 1963Safegard CorpCoffin mattress
US4042988 *Nov 2, 1976Aug 23, 1977Odell HollidayAir mattress
US4672700 *Mar 13, 1985Jun 16, 1987Steridyne CorporationAntidecubitis cushion
US4688283 *Dec 23, 1985Aug 25, 1987Jacobson Theodore LMattress which conforms to body profile
US4965901 *Aug 21, 1989Oct 30, 1990Gaudry NormandFuton with inflatable core
US5022110 *Apr 17, 1989Jun 11, 1991Kinetic Concepts, Inc.Low air loss mattress
US5027454 *Jan 31, 1990Jul 2, 1991Peng Jung ChingCombined bed structure
US5561875 *Oct 25, 1994Oct 8, 1996Crown Therapeutics, Inc.Vacuum/heat formed cushion supported on a fluid permeable manifold
US5596781 *Oct 20, 1995Jan 28, 1997Crown Therapeutics, Inc.Vacuum/heat formed cushion with pyramidal, inflatable cells
EP1093739A1 *Oct 20, 1999Apr 25, 2001Aqua Dynamic AGFoamtray and inner cover for an inflatable mattress
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/706, 5/710
International ClassificationA47C27/08
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/081, A47C27/128
European ClassificationA47C27/08A, A47C27/12H