Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2069747 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1937
Filing dateApr 17, 1935
Priority dateApr 17, 1935
Publication numberUS 2069747 A, US 2069747A, US-A-2069747, US2069747 A, US2069747A
InventorsAtkins Harry C
Original AssigneeAtkins Harry C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilated berry crate
US 2069747 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1937. H. c. ATKlN 2,059,747

VENTILATED BERRY CRATE Filed April 17, 1955 2 SheellS-Sheell l FJ; E.

JNVENTOR. HAR/Py C. A T/f//VS E BY 20 5 q /8 v Q 5 ATTORNEY.

Feb. 9, 1937. H, TKINS 2,069,747

VENTILATED BERRY CRATE Filed April 17, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. AfA/PAW C. A TAV/V5 ATTORNEY.

Patented Fel). 9, 1937" UNITED STATES ATENT omer "VEN'IILATED BERRY CRATE Harry C. Atliins, Denver, Colo. Y Application April 17, 1935,'Serial No. 16,791

claims. (01.217940) such construction that the berries, or other fruit,A

will always be properly ventilated.

Another object of this invention is to produce a crate that shall have means for cooperating with the boxes located therein to hold the same properly positioned at all times so as to prevent the contents of the boxes from being crushed or injured due to shifting ofthe boxes during handling.

A still further object of this invention is to produce a crate having a removable cover provided on its under surface with transverse positioning cleats that cooperate with the ends of the crateand with divider cleats so positioned that they projectfdown into the space between adjacent boxes and prevent them from shifting and crushing each other and also holds them from ,movement toward the cover.

2 Another object of this invention is to produce a crate of such construction that two or more of them can be assembled in superposed relation withoutinterfering with the proper ventilation of the contents.

A further object of the invention is to produce a crate of such construction that two or more crates can be superposed and readily interconnected so that they may be handled as a unit.

The abo-ve and other objects that may become v apparent as this description proceeds are attained byvmeans of a construction and arrangement of parts that will now be described in detail and for this purpose reference will be had j to the accompanying drawings in which the invention has been illustrated and in which- Figure 1 is a top plan view showing an empty crate with the cover in place thereon;

Figure 2 is a view partly in elevation and partly a section taken on line 2 2, Figure 1, and shows how two superposed crates are interconnected,

the top crate being broken away;A

Figure 3 is a section taken on line 3 3, Figure 1;`

Figure 4 is a view looking upwardly toward the I v bottom of a crate at an angle;

.A Figure 5 is a fragmentary section, similar to that shown in Figure 2 and shows how the crates are interconnected;

, Figure 6 is a perspective View of two interconl 55 i, nected crates;

the outside of each end 5, near .the Yupperedge bottom strip on each side. VThe Awidth of the crate 'place'. The collars have upwardly and inwardly Figure y'I is a side elevationof a crate of slightly Y mod-ined construction; and

vFigure 8 is an en'd View of the crate shown in Figure?.

In the drawings, and referring more particularly to Figuresfl to 6, reference numeral 5' designates `the ends of the crate and numeral 6 desig` -nates the sides thereof. @The bottom is formed by Y a number of spacedl longitudinally extending strips '1.V A strengthening strip 8 extends alo'ng lo of the latter.

It will'be seen .that v.the Vwidth of the sides 6 is less than the width of the ends 5, s'o that a considerable space is leftbetween the side and the is usually 'such that itwill accommodate three rows of boxes 9 like those shown in Figure ,3. The boxes are'provide'd with VupwardlyV and outwardly inclined side walls, asindicated by reference numeral lll. The sides of the boxes are per- :2o .forated and provided `with Ventilating lopenings I'I and each box has .a removable collar I2 that holds a transparent and moistureproof cover in inclinedV flanges .|3. -The cover of the crate consists of several longitudinally extending spaced strips lidiwhose lengths are equal to the total length of thetcratejincluding the thickness of the two strips 8. Secured 30 to the top off strips .I4 near each end is a tra11s. i verse strip I5.1 Onlthe under side of thevover two triangular cleats I6 are located. lThesevcleats have across section that is a right-angledttriangle. ,Gleats I6 are sonpositioned that the hy- Ipcathenu'se side of each is on the inside and onel35 Hof/'the other/sides is on the .outside and serves to yengage.theinside of the adjacent end to form a stop. V,The'fapexes'of these cleats projectV downvwardlylvnetvi'reen the ends and the endbox of each 40 row. The coverisalsoprovided with a pluralityrf: `of transverse positioning cleats I1 whose cross sections are preferably isosceles triangles varid are securedwith their basesagainst the under sideof the cover.- 45 Cleats i1 are spaced aldistance equal-to the/1 width'` of the boxes'and project into the spaces between the angeslS. Cleats Ylli serve to" posi- :tion the cover 'with respectV to the crate Vand cleats I1 serventoposition'l the boxes and to holdthem 50 fromslidingwhen the loaded crate is beinghanf dled and assure thatno crushing force willbe applied to the boxes.

ylirorn 3, A-it will bevseen that each row `/otboxes is suppe edonasingle bottom strp 1 55 line with the corresponding triangular openings between the rows ofboxes and therefore air has as free access to the sides of the boxes as if the boxes were not in a crate and hence the contents of the boxes keep fresh. Y

Each crate is preferably of such size that it will hold three rows of boxes, each rowhaving four boxes, and there will thereforebe twelve boxes in each crate.

For convenience in handling and shipping it is customary to connect two crates, one above the other, in the manner shown in Figure 5. In order to properly space the bottom of the crate from a flat surface on which it is standing and from the top of the lower crate when two are assembled as shown in Figure 5, the crate is provided at each end of its bottom with transverse strips I8 that serve as spacers.

I9 of the same size as strips I8 and so spaced that th'edistance between their far sides is the same as the distance between the near sides of strips by side as shown most clearly Yin Figure 5,.

' Y AIn'V order to. assure as free circulation of air as possible, the ends are provided with notches 22 that are in line with the spaces between the rows of boxes and there are therefore Vunobstructed air passages' extending entirely through the crates.

Y Attention is called to the fact that the ends of vone of the positioning cleats project beyond the sides 6 as indicated by reference numeral'23 and L'these ends prevent the cover from bending sufficiently to apply a crushing force to the berries.

The crate shown in vFigures 7 and 8 diiiers Vfrom the other in this, that its width is sufficient to accommodate two rows of boxes, and its length issufiicient to accommodate four boxes, while the height is such that three boxes can beplaced one above the other.' Each layer of boxes is separatedfrom the one above by means of separators 24 whose ends rest on the triangular cleats 25 that are secured to the ends of the box. Since the separators rest Yon the cleats 25 and have one V transverse cleat provided with projections 1.23

'f thatl rest on the upper edge of the side strips 6, lthere will beno weight supportednbyY the berry boxes `or .the berries, and the boxes can therefore Y be heaped without danger of crushing any of the berries. ,The cover employed with'the crate shown in Figures 7 and 8 is made just the same as that f shown in Vthe other views with this exception, that it has three longitudinal strips I4 instead of four.

Attentionis now directed to4 Figure V"2 from which it will be seen that the cleats I8 project bethe stripsr on one will lengage strips 8 on the! end to end,as in loading a car, the cleats I8 on one'will engage cleats I8 on the other, and that other, and the adjacent ends will therefore be lseparated ja distance equal to two thicknesses of ,l strips 8. By spacing the ends of theboxes when the crates are loaded in cars or on trucks, air

can circulate between the adjacent end surfaces and enter the notches 22, thereby facilitating circulation. It will also be observed that in the absence of the notches 22, the spacing of the ends would make no appreciable difference, and that the spacing means 8 and I8 cooperate with the Ventilating notches 22 to produce the Vdesired air circulation.

The end 5a of the crate illustrated in Figures 7 and 8, due to the greater depth of the crate, are not made solid as in the other embodiment but is preferably a rectangular frame like that shown in Figure 8.

'Ihe cleats I8 andl9 Yserve to interconnect two crates in the Amanner above explained and shown in Figure 5.

It will be apparent that'the crate illustrated in Figures 7 and 8 will hold twice as many berry boxes as the one shown in Figures l t0 6, and is sometimes preferred by the producers.`

Having described the invention what is claimed as new is:

1. A shipping andstorage package `for'berriesY and the like, comprisingin combination, a cratek adapted to hold a plurality of rows rof berry boxes, and a cover provided on its under surface with a )pluralityA of Ytransversely extending triangular cleats so spaced andV of suchthickness that the apexes of the cleats project linto the spaces between adjacent boxes in each row and serve to position the boxes and hold them against movement relative to thecrate.

2.V A shipping and storage package for berries and the like, comprising in combination, a crate adapted to hold a pluralityof rows of berry boxes,

, and a cover provided on its under surface'with a plurality of transversely extending triangular cleats so spaced and of such thickness that the apexes ofthe cleats project into the spaces between adjacent boxes in each row andfservel to position the boxes' and hold them against movement relative` to the crate, "the cover being also provided with transversecleats so positioned 1 that they engage .the inside surfaces of the ends of the crate to position ther cover with-respecttothe *crate andfto hold it against movement relative to the crate. k

3. A shipping and storage package for berries and the like comprising in combination, a crate adapted to hold a plurality of rows of berry boxes,`provided aboutV their upper edges with upwardly and inwardly inclined iianges, and a cover provided on its under surface with triangular transverse cleats so positioned that their apexes project intothe spaces between the adja"' cent flanges and provide positioning means for the boxes.

4. A shipping and storage packing for berries and the like, comprising in combination, a crate adapted Vto hold aplurality of Vrows of berryboxes provided about their upper edges with upwardly and inwardlyV inclined flanges, thev crate having end walls, and a cover provided on its under surface with two transverselyV ex-Y tending positioning cleats of a -right angle tri-' angle cross section and positioned with their inclined sides facing inwardly, these cleats being so positioned that they engage theinside of spaces between the inclined flanges of the collars and serve to hold the boxes in a predetermined position.

5. A crate for use with ventilated berry boxes comprising in combination, two parallel ends of a width somewhat greater than the depth of the berry boxes, the ends being connected by side strips that are narrower than the ends and located with their upper edges below the tops of the ends, the lower edges of the ends being connected by means of narrow spaced apart bottom strips and a removable cover for the crate, said cover comprising a plurality of spaced longitudinal strips, transverse end strips connecting the ends of the longitudinal strips, and a plurality of triangular cleats extending across the under surface of the cover strips and of su'icient thickness to project below the tops of any berry boxes located in the crate, the cleats located nearest the ends of the cover serving as stops to limit endwise movement of the cover on the crate.

6. A shipping crate for berries and the like comprising a box portion having end walls, sides, a bottom and a removable cover, means for interconnecting superposed crates comprising a pair of transverse cleats secured to the under surface of the bottoms, one cleat near each end and a pair of similar cleats secured to the top of the cover, one cleat near each end," the distance between the near sides of one pair being the same as the distance between the far sides of the other pair, whereby when two crates of the same size are superposed the cleats attached to the bottom of the upper crate will be posiiiioned adjacent the corresponding cleats attached to the cover of the lower crate, the cleats having openings for the reception of pins.

7. A shipping crate for berries and the like comprising a box portion having end walls, sides, a bottom and a removable cover, the lower surface of the cover having means for positioning it relative to the box portion, said means comprising two transversely extending cleats, one near each end, the distance between the far sides of the cleats being substantially equal to the distance between the near sides of the ends whereby the cover will be longitudinally positioned, the length of the cleats being substantially the same as the distance between the sides whereby the cover will be positioned transversely, and means for interconnecting superposed crates, comprising a pair of transverse cleats secured to the bottom and a pair of transverse cleats secured to the cover, the distance between the near sides of one pair being the same as the distance between the far sides of the other pair whereby when twoV crates of the same size are superposed the cleats attached to the bottom of the upper crate will be positioned adjacent lthe corresponding cleats attached to the cover of the lower crate, the cleats having openings for the reception of pins.

8. A shipping and storage package for berries and the like comprising, a crate having ends and sides and adapted to hold a plurality of rows of berry boxes, supported on the bottom of the crate and adapted tohold a plurality of layers of berry boxes, located one layer over the other, separators between adjacent layers of boxes, and means comprising cleats attached to the inside surfaces of the ends of the crate for supporting the separators, and a cover supported on the top of the crate, the under sides of the separators and the cover having transversely extending cleats that project into the spaces between adjacent boxes in each row to hold them against longitudinal movement.

9. A shipping and storage package for berries and the like comprising a crate having ends and sides and adapted to hold a plurality of rows of berry boxes, supported on the bottom of the crate, and a plurality of layers of boxes located one layer over the other, ends of the separators between adjacent layers of boxes, and means comprising cleats attached to the inside surfaces of the ends for supporting the ends of the separators, and transverse cleats secured to the centers of the separators, of greater length than the width of the crates, for supporting the separators from the sides of the crates.

10. A shipping and storage package for berries and the like comprising in combination, a crate adapted to hold a plurality of rows of berry boxes, and a cover provided on its under surface with triangular transverse cleats so positioned that their apexes project into the spaces between the adjacent boxes and provide positioning means for the boxes.

HARRY C. ATKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3191769 *May 2, 1963Jun 29, 1965Armour & CoShipping and display container for cartoned goods
US3395823 *Nov 16, 1966Aug 6, 1968Edward Langston EverettLug construction
US5820908 *Nov 21, 1996Oct 13, 1998Liland Technology, L.L.C.Produce packing and handling apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification217/40
International ClassificationB65D85/34
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/34
European ClassificationB65D85/34