Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2070254 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1937
Filing dateJun 18, 1935
Priority dateJun 18, 1935
Publication numberUS 2070254 A, US 2070254A, US-A-2070254, US2070254 A, US2070254A
InventorsBurgner Harry W
Original AssigneeBurgner Harry W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carrier device for golf clubs and the like
US 2070254 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1937. H. w. BURGNER CARRIER DEVICE FOR GOLF CLUBS AND THE LIKE Filed June 18, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR BY )ym w.

ATTORNEYS.

.flwy WBurgnu I H........ m

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR BY ATTORNEXS H. W. BURGNER Filed June 18, 1935 CARRIER DEVICE FOR GOLF CLUBS AND THE LIKE Feb. 9, 1937.

Patented Feb. 9, 1937 PATENT OFFICE CARRIER DEVICE FOR GOLF CLUBS AND THE LIKE

Harry W. Burgner, Sinking Spring, Pa.

Application June 18,

9 Claims.

My invention relates to a carrier device for golf clubs or'other like articles, in the nature of a bag adapted to safely hold an individual set of clubs for travel or convenient conveyance over the course,- and for selective removal of any individual club for play.

The golf bag commonly in use has an open top and the clubs are loosely held and subjected to harmful frictional rubbing together both in transporting and in insertion and withdrawal from the bag; and attempts heretofore made to separately assort them have not avoided the frictional wear of their insertion or removal, or have failed in other manner, as in fully protecting them when not in use.

An important object of my invention is to provide a carrier for the clubs in which they may be desirably firmly held in separate supports, .entirely enclosed and protected for their safe transportation; and fully exposed for their lateral removal without any frictional rubbing contact along their length.

Another object of my invention is to form a bag of articulated club-holding sections that may be folded fiat for convenient transportation or reversely folded or spread to uncover the clubs. Other possibilities include a built in and hidden ball pocket, and a projectable spike for supporting the bag at rest in a vertical position.

With the above outlined objects in view, and with other objects and advantages that will later herein appear, my invention comprises the im-, proved carrier device or bag as will now be more fully described in connection with the accompanying drawings, and the novel features thereof set forth in the appended claims.

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a carrier device embodying certain preferred features of my invention and shown with a protective hood extension of the cover drawn up to fully enclose the frame held clubs.

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the carrier shown in Fig. 1, disclosing the frame sections in closed flat folded position.

Fig. 3 is a perspective, mainly side elevation, corresponding to the showing of Figs. 1 and 2, but on a somewhat larger scale, and with the protective covering partly broken away on the near side, and the hood extension in folded-down position.

' Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the supporting frame sections alone, reversely folded to outwardly expose the club holding top and bottom rails.

Fig. 5 is a detail view of the longitudinally mov- 1935, Serial No. 27,199

able spike which is adapted to be forced into the turf to support the bag in a vertical resting position.

Fig. 6 is a detail view of a frame rail showing a spring-guarded shaft-engageable slot for a golf club.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the covered frame opened'out flat-wise, the interior of the carrier being fully disclosed.

Fig. 8 is a detail view showing a convenient arrangement of a built-in pocket for golf balls.

Fig. 9 is a detail view disclosing one means of securing the protective covering and hood extension to the frame.

Fig. 10 is a perspective elevational view of a carrier embodying my invention, but adapted for a greater number of clubs.

In the preferred embodiment of my invention I have indicated a plurality of articulated sectional frames adapted to carry the clubs and form the supporting structure when desired for a suitable protective cover 5, which may be of the nature of leather or cloth, though not necessarily limited thereto.

The particular sections referred to above, as best seen in Fig. 4, are made up of similar pairs of open frame structures, the main frames of each pair having a common side or edge member formed by a pivot post 6, and opposite sides or edges formed by separate pivot posts 7 and '1" respectively, each post a and i forming a common side or edge member for an added frame. The ends of posts [3, l, and '5 form pintles engaging in pivot ears formed at the ends of the top and bottom frame members 8 and 8' and 9 and 9' of the respective main pair of frames, rigidly spacing them, and post 6 pivotally connecting them. The added frames connected to the main pair of frames by pivot posts I and l are shown as having side edge members l0 and in, top rails H and II' and bottom rails l2 and I2 respectively, said top and bottom rails having pivot ears engaged by posts I and l to hingedly con nect them to their respective main frames. These frame sections are intended to be strong, and preferably made of metal and in order to secure strength without unnecessary weight. I have shown all the top and bottom rails and side members I0 and III as preferably formed of U- shaped channel material, with the channels in the top and bottom rails extending in opposed relation, and the channel sides adjacent their end pivot ears cut-away or shaped so the respective frame sections may be folded on one another in reverse directions, into a closed fiat relation as 55 shown in Fig. 3, or in opened and reversely faced directions as shown in Fig. 4, where the added sections are abutted to form one plane face of a triangular arrangement. The clubs are intended, in this showing, to be held with the handle ends down and resting on the lower rail member within the channel sides of the latter, and the top rails are adapted to engage the shafts below the upwardly projecting club heads. As one means of engaging and holding the clubs the top rail is provided with one or more spaced L-shaped apertures IS, the lateral entrance to which is past a guard spring l6 as clearly seen in Fig. 6; and it will be noted'such lateral entrances are on the outside face of the frame sections when folded as shown in Fig. 4, and said faces are inside when folded as shown in Fig. 3. Any suitable catch or latch device, indicated at l8 may be employed to hold the added frames with their edges l0, ID in the abutted relation of Fig. 4, or in the folded contacted position shown in Fig. 3.

To support the open frame shown in Fig. 3 from toppling from an upright position, post 6 is shown as formed from a tube and enclosing a longitudinally shiftable rod 20 having a spiked end 2! and an operating handle 22 engaging through a suitable slotted aperture 23 in post tube 6, any detent, as spring pressed ball 24, acting to hold said spiked end 2| in retracted position within said tube, but allowing its forced projection into the turf when required.

The articulated sectional frame structure above described, may of itself form a suitable carrier device for the golf clubs, or similar rod-like articles, firmly retained interiorly of the folded frame, as seen in Fig. 3, or exteriorly presented for selective lateral removal when reversely folded as seen in Fig. 4 and the club shafts carried by the top and bottom frame rails are separately spaced to prevent frictional rubbing against one another, and firmly held in an upright position against any distorting bending strains.

To complete the protection of the clubs thus carried by the'sectional frames, I prefer to enclose the latter with the cover 5, before mentioned, applied to the exterior faces of the frame sections when folded as seen in Fig. 3, which shows the cover broken away on the near side. This cover, as stated, is preferably of a relatively flexible material, and one means of attaching it to the frame sections is indicated in Figs. 8 and 9, showing a suitable length of the material folded about the closed sections and secured to the top and bottom frame members, and side members and [0' by binding strips 25, parted to fit the separate frames and secured to the latter as by rivets 26. And Fig. 9 indicates the lower edge of a hood extension 21 secured by the binding strip, which hood may be drawn up in known manner to inclose the upwardly projecting golf club heads, as seen in Figs. 1 and 2, or folded down to expose said heads, as seen in Fig. 3. Fig. 8 further discloses a ball pocket 28 secured within the covered frame adjacent to or partly enclosed within the channel side of a frame side member ID or ill, such pocket being exposed for removal of the balls when the frame is opened as seen in Fig. 4, but inclosed within the bag when folded as seen in Fig. 3. A suitable handle 30 and shoulder carrying strap 3| may be provided as shown,and loops 32, seen in Fig. 3, may be attached to the inside of the cover 5, if desired, to hold the club shafts in spaced position within the lower channel members 9, 9', l2 and face of said intermediate frame.

l2, or said channels may be otherwise divided into separate pockets for the shafts.

From the foregoing description it is believed the nature of my improvements and the manner of their use will be readily understood, and that these improvements lend themselves readily to various other embodiments within the spirit of my invention. As one such different embodiment, I have indicated in Fig. 10, articulated sections in which an intermediate frame is formed with a double'top rail 35 and double bottom rail 36 adapted to hold clubs on both faces thereof, and the frame edges 31 and 38 pivotally connected to the respective frame edges of said intermediate frame have single top and bottom rails and each is foldable to cover a respective In this case a protective cover need only be attached to the end frames 31 and 38, and might readily be of sheet material if desired.

The frame rails need not necessarily be channel shape, but may have other forms adapted particularly for holding other articles than golf clubs, one thought in mind being a travelling gun-case. Other modifications and changes may naturally be developed and are intended to be included within the terms of my invention'as defined in the following claims.

What I claim is:

1. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a plurality of articulated club-supporting sections provided on one face thereof with laterally-engageable club-holding means, said sections being swingable on one another to retainingly infold the held clubs and to outwardly expose them for selective lateral removal and replacement.

2. A carrier device for golf clubs and-the like, comprising a plurality of articulated rigid frame sections provided on one face thereof with laterally-engageable club-holding means, said sections being swingable on one another to retainingly infold the held clubs and to outwardly ex pose them for selective lateral removal and replacement.

3. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a plurality of rectangular sections provided on one face thereof with laterally-em gageable club-holding means, and flexible connections uniting the edges of two adjacent sections adapted to permit reverse folding of said sections to retainingly inclose the held clubs and to outwardly expose them for selective lateral removal and replacement.

4. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a series of frame sections provided on one face thereof with means for holding clubs in laterally removable and replaceable engagement therewith, pivot post side members each of which hingedly connects two adjoining frame sections to form a flexible structure swingable to retainingly inclose the held clubs and to outwardly expose them for selective lateral removal and replacement.

5. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a series of frame sections provided on one face thereof with means for holding clubs in laterally removable and replaceable engagement therewith, pivot post side members each of which hingedly connects two adjoining frame sections to form a flexible structure swingable on an intermediate pivot post into a fiat-folded club-retaim'ng relation, and reversely swingable into a triangular shape to outwardly expose said clubs for lateral removal and replacement, the free ends of the two end frame sections abutting to position said ends in a common plane to form one side of said triangle.

6. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a series of frame sections provided on one face thereof with means for holding clubs in laterally removable and replaceable engagement therewith, pivot post side members each of which hingedly connects two adjoining frame sections to form a flexible structure swingable on one another into a collapsed flattened relation to retainingly inclose the held clubs, and reversely swingable into an extended open relation to outwardly expose said clubs for selective lateral removal and replacement.

7. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a series of frame sections provided on one face thereof with means for holding clubs in laterally removable and replaceable engagement therewith, pivot post side members each of which hingedly connects two adjoining frame sections to form a flexible structure swingable to retainingly inclose the held clubs and to outwardly expose them for selective lateral removal and replacement, one of said pivot posts enclosing a longitudinally movable rod having a spiked end projectable exteriorly of said post for supporting the device when the clubs are exteriorly exposed, and retractable into said post when the clubs are retainingly inclosed.

8. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a plurality of rigid frame sections flexibly connected at adjoining edges and provided with a covering material on one face and laterally-engageable club-holding means on the opposite face, said frame sections being swingable on one another to retainingly infold the held clubs within the covering material, and to infold the covering material and outwardly expose the held clubs for their lateral removaland replacement.

9. A carrier device for golf clubs and the like, comprising a flexible protective cover, and a reversely foldable rigid frame support therefor made up of a series of frame sections hingedly joined at their abutting .sides and each having on one side the protective coverand on the other side a club supporting face provided with laterally-engageable club-holding means, said frame sections being swingable on one another to retainingly infold the club-supporting faces within the covering material, and to infold the protective cover faces and outwardly expose the club-supporting faces to permit lateral removal and replacement of the latter.

' HARRY W. BURGNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415314 *Jul 16, 1945Feb 4, 1947Todd Gibbon HGolf club carrier
US2436687 *Feb 1, 1945Feb 24, 1948Lee Corbett RobertClub head retaining means for golf club bags
US2471169 *Mar 25, 1947May 24, 1949Hughes Jr Edwin JGolf bag
US2502627 *May 12, 1947Apr 4, 1950Martin Leslie TSectional self-supporting golf bag
US2547829 *Dec 13, 1947Apr 3, 1951George I MillsGolf club cart
US2726874 *Nov 3, 1953Dec 13, 1955John J SullivanConvertible golf case and cart
US2837346 *Dec 23, 1955Jun 3, 1958Chambless Ersyl FFolding combination golf bag and caddy cart
US2857168 *Jan 3, 1955Oct 21, 1958Neaverson Rowland AlecApparatus for storing and transporting golf clubs or the like
US3045788 *Feb 10, 1959Jul 24, 1962Ingve Cederholm CarlBayonet reel
US4655346 *Aug 19, 1985Apr 7, 1987Reinholz Orville ASelf-standing golf bag
US4666038 *Mar 3, 1986May 19, 1987Minneman William JGold equipment carrier
US4858761 *Jun 15, 1988Aug 22, 1989Pininfarina Extra S.R.L.Bag, particularly a golf bag, of variable configuration
US5209539 *Jan 17, 1992May 11, 1993Edge Technologies, Inc.Portable golf club carrier and support
US5333731 *Jun 15, 1993Aug 2, 1994Mccuaig Kenneth WGolf case for separate retention of clubs during travel
US5469960 *Jul 20, 1994Nov 28, 1995James Richard InglebyGolf bag
US5582290 *Jul 29, 1994Dec 10, 1996K. W. McCuaigDevice for supporting inverted golf clubs
US5636852 *Jun 21, 1995Jun 10, 1997Sistrunk; Ronald R.Recreational equipment transporter
US5687843 *Aug 4, 1995Nov 18, 1997James Richard InglebyGolf bag
US5738229 *May 21, 1996Apr 14, 1998Fairweather; Brian DonDisplay rack
US6050405 *Feb 4, 1998Apr 18, 2000Golf Lock, Inc.Golf club lock
US6607077 *Mar 26, 2002Aug 19, 2003Philip Edward FeeneyGolf rack bag
US7337898 *Sep 30, 2003Mar 4, 2008Fred LewterGolf bag
US7481311 *Mar 9, 2007Jan 27, 2009Old James AGold club bag for use with golf cart
US7740135 *Nov 3, 2006Jun 22, 2010Frank E. TaylorArticle of manufacture for carrying and storing golf clubs and related accessories required to play golf
US8584861 *Aug 3, 2011Nov 19, 2013Acushnet CompanyPortable golf shaft display assembly
US8757399 *Jul 13, 2012Jun 24, 2014Kenneth P. WolfbauerFishing rod carrier and cover therefor
US8820524 *May 31, 2012Sep 2, 2014Nike, Inc.Lightweight modular golf bag with frame
US20130015151 *Jul 13, 2012Jan 17, 2013Wolfbauer Kenneth PFishing rod carrier and cover therefor
US20130032557 *Aug 3, 2011Feb 7, 2013Porath Brett CPortable golf shaft display assembly
US20130092574 *May 31, 2012Apr 18, 2013Nike, Inc.Lightweight Modular Golf Bag With Frame
WO1997000802A1 *May 28, 1996Jan 9, 1997John David Sistrunk IiiRecreational equipment transporter
WO2002024282A2 *Sep 17, 2001Mar 28, 2002Elrick Alistair AllardyceGolf equipment case
WO2006090166A1 *Feb 27, 2006Aug 31, 2006Richard AndrewsGolf club carrier and support
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/70.2, 294/169, 248/96, 294/159, 294/143
International ClassificationA63B55/00, A63B55/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B55/004, A63B55/04, A63B55/00
European ClassificationA63B55/00, A63B55/04