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Publication numberUS2071365 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1937
Filing dateNov 27, 1934
Priority dateNov 27, 1934
Publication numberUS 2071365 A, US 2071365A, US-A-2071365, US2071365 A, US2071365A
InventorsJohn Stroop
Original AssigneePad Y Wax Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wax applicator and method of making the same
US 2071365 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1937. J. STROOP 2,071,365

WAX APPLICATOR AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Nov. 27, 1934.

LACQUER CELLULOSE INVENTOR JOHN S TROOP ATTORNEY '20 for these purposes.

disintegrated by the hydrocarbon solvent in the Patented Feb. 23, 1937 WAX APPLICATOR AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME John Stroop, New York, N. Y., assignor to Pad-Y- Wax Company, Inc., a corporation of New York Application November 27,1934, Serial No. 754,951 '13 Claims. Rel. 91-625) The present invention relates to wax applicators and methods of making the same.

The present invention contemplates a form of wax applicator. which is a complete article of manufacture provided with a quantity of wax substance and solvent held in a porous reservoiring structure suitable for direct application to a surface to be waxed and of a nature to gradually give up the wax as it is rubbed on the surface, and yet require no extraneous means (as a cover) to 1191a it together. v

Most porous structures, such as cloth, felt, and the like, which require no covering means to hold them intact are unsatisfactory for the purposes as they have a very limited power to absorb wax, and retain a very large proportion of what they do absorb. The more common structures of high degree of porosity, such as rubber sponge or natural sponge are not suited The rubber sponge is quickly wax and by the wax itself so that this material cannot be employed. Natural spongejbesides being too expensive is notavailable in satisfactory qu ntitiesand sizes and with the uniform porosity required of a manufactured article. The preferred reservoiring material is an artificial sponge of nitrated cellulose. Y

, This sponge is artificially produced by nitrating and processing a base of cellulose stock in such a manner that a sequence of interconnected cells are created in a structure which functionally has every attribute of the natural sponge. This process is known and forms no part of the present invention. This artificial sponge forms a highly compressible structure of flexible skeleton form having interconnected voids and has the advantage of possible production in any shap or size suitable to wax applicators and in addition to this can be produced with cell or pore characteristics exactly designed to serve as the efilcient reservoir for wax. The cellulose character of this sponge is unaffectedby waxes or the customary hydrocarbon solvents of wax compounds. Hence 5 ficial sponge in contact.

' The applicators may be produced in any size determined only by the amount of wax to be reservoired. The applicator may be of small size suitable for waxing shoes or furniture or for automobiles or maybe larger to reservoir sufficient wax for floor waxing. A further object of the present invention is to providethe sponge with'an impervious back. This may, for example, be in the form of a sheet a stable article may be made with wax and artiand passed under a scraper l2 which holds the of lacquered fabric secured to the sponge by adhesive or bysewing, or may comprise a layer or coating of cellulose lacquer. Where a handle is desired, the handle may be secured in place by lacquer which acts as an adhesive, or by sewing.

The accompanying drawing shows, for purposes of illustrating the present invention several embodiments in which the invention may take form together with the method of making the pads, it

being understood that the drawing is illustrative of the invention rather than limiting the same.

In this drawing:

Fig. l is a diagrammatic view illustrating a portion of the process of manufacture;

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating, a further portion of the process;

Fig. 3 illustrates the cutting of the waxing pads into units; V

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a maxing pad showing the manner of use; and j Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive are sectional views through pads of various forms of construction.

The artificial cellulose nitrate sponge used in making these pads has a high degree of porosity. The openings are preferably as large as possible and yet retain the wax in place. Too large holes permit large masses of wax without anything to hold them in place, and are therefore to be avoided. Too small pores hold the wax back and hinder its flow when the .pad is rubbed over a surface. A sponge with the maximum size of opening of about inch is preferred.

The sponge is cut or formed to the right thickness (approximately inch for a hand pad).

For ease in processing, a large sheet or layer of sponge is employed suflicient for the manufac-- ture of a number of pads.

The cellulose sponge in its natural state is stiff and harsh and-not suitable for rubbing on a surface to be waxed- This harshness is not present when the sponge is wet. Water has a softening physical effect on the sponge, but it is not permanent. ,On evaporation of the water the hard state is restored. The treatment of the sponge to receive the wax involves twostrips, the providing of an impervious back and the softening ,of the sponge. Either step may be performed first. I

To render the back of the sponge sheet im'- pervious to'wax and wax solvents, the sponge may be coated with a lacquer as shown in Figure 1. The sponge layer is indicated at. l0, and nitro cellulose lacquer is flowed onto it as indicated at H. The sponge is moved to the right While the lacquer is still wet, handle strips having loops H which project up so as to stay out of the lacquer. The lacquer dries very quickly and seals all the pores on that side of the sponge as well as secures the handles in place.

The softening may be accomplished and permanently retained if the water is mixed with a suitable hygroscopic agent to prevent evaporation. These agents may include a number of organic materials which are compatible with the wax and sponge. Glycerine is the preferred agent for this purpose. The sponge sheet is passed under a spout l9 which applies a solution of glycerine in water. From 30% to of glyceririe may be used. The wet sponge is then squeezed to remove as much of the glycerine and water as possible. This may be done We wringer 20. The glycerine retained will not evaporate and will insure that the water content is always present. If desired, the glyoerine and water may be applied and wrung out before the lacquering step.

The softened sponge is then passed under filler spouts 2| where the wax and wax solvent, heated slightly to melt them, is allowed to fiow onto the sponge. A sufiicient quantity is emplayed to fill all the pores. Any excess may be removed by a scraper 22. The wax solidifies. and the large sheet is then cut, as indicated at 23 and 24 of Figure 3, to form square or rectangular pads, each having a uniform charge of wax, a flexible impervious backing and a handle. Instead of hydrocarbon-type of wax, one may use an emulsion type of wax. The pad is shown in Figures 4 and 5.

The pad produced as described is ready for use. The user can-pass the fingers through the strap as indicated in Figure 4 and easily rub the pad over a surface so as'to leave a film of wax. The surface of the pad is soft and pliable and'produces a. very satisfactory feel" as the pad is used. As the pad is used the wax keeps worldng out to the pad surface so as to be ready to be transferred to the surface of the article being waxed. The pad is pliable so that a sub.- stantially kneading action takes place. The en tire supply of wax may therefore be used. Owing to the impervious layer at the back,the hand does not become soiled.

These applicators are packaged in cellophane I envelopes which protect the wax from deteriorative evaporation. These envelopes are superior to cans or bottles in ease of access and are resealable in such a manner that no loss of wax occurs.

Figure 6 shows a pad similar to that of Figure 4, except that the handle strap 25 is formed to receive all four fingers. It is secured in the lacquer backing while still wet.

Figure 7 shows'a pad in which a layer 2} of fabric, preferably lacquer coated (or oilcloth) is secured to the sponge'body. byadhesive lacquer 21. The handle 28 is secured by adhesive.

The waxing pad of Figure 8 employs a layer of sponge 30, a nitro cellulose treated fabric stood that the particular forms shown are buta few of the many forms. Various modifications and changes being possible, I do "not otherwise limit myself in any way with respect thereto. What is claimed is:

1. A container type wax applicator having a wax reservoir in the form of a compressible structure of cellulose spongematerial, and a charge of wax carried therein.

2. A container type wax applicator having a wax reservoir in the form of a compressible structure of cellulose sponge material treated with hygroscopic compounds to soften the cellulose structure, and a charge of wax carried therein.

Y 3. A container type wax applicator having a reservoir in the form of a compressible structure of cellulose spongematerial' having on one side an impervious adhesive layer resistant to and unaifected by. wax or wax solvents, and 'a charge of wax carried therein.

4. In a container type wax applicatona reservoir in the form of a compressible structure of cellulose sponge material having on one side an impervious adhesive layer resistant to wax and unaffected by wax or wax solvents, and a handle strap secured in position by said adhesive layer.

5. In a container type wax applicator, a dense and flexible layer of material -having adhesive qualities serving to bond to itself on one side a wax reservoir of cellulose sponge structure and on the other side a strap, said layer of adhesive being impervious to wax and wax solvents.

6. A wax applicator comprising a layer of homogeneous cellulose sponge carrying a hygroscopic softening agent and a--charge of wax and rendered impervious to wax and wax solvents,

and a charge of-wax and wax solvents in th sponge material. 4

8. A wax applicator comprising "a layer of cellulose sponge rendered soft and elastic by glycerine and'water, and a loading of wax and wax solvent carried by the sponge and adapted to exude upon application of pressure, and a protective cover for one'face of the sponge layer.

' 9. A wax applicator comprising a layer of cel lulose sponge rendered soft and elastic by glycerine and water, and a loading of wax and wax solvent'carried by the sponge and adapted to exude ppon application of pressure, and a pro- .tective cover for one face of the sponge layer,

said layer being in the form of a coating of lacquer. p

1 0. A wax applicator comprising a layer of cellulose sponge rendered soft and elastic by glycerine and water. and a loading of wax and wax solvent carried by the sponge and adapted to exude uponapplication of pressure. and a protective cover for one faceof the sponge layer, said layer being in the form of a layer of impervious fabric secured to the sponge by lacquer.

11. A wax applicator comprising a layer of cellulose sponge rendered soft and elastic by glyceri'ne and water, anda loading of wax and wax solvent carried by the sponge and adapted to exude upon application of pressure, and a protective cover for one face of thespongelayer, said-layer. being in the form of a layer of impervious fabricltitched to the sponge.

12. A wax applicator comprising a layer of cellulose sponge rendered soft and elastic by glycerine and water, and a loading of wax and wax solvent carried by the sponge and adapted to exude upon application of pressure, a protective layer of lacquer for one face of the sponge, and a handle secured in place by the lacquer.

13. The method of making wax applicators

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2802240 *Oct 26, 1951Aug 13, 1957Lockheed Aircraft CorpMethod of making cellular plastic articles
US3088158 *Mar 28, 1961May 7, 1963Union Carbide CorpCleaning and polishing sponge
US3217353 *Dec 9, 1964Nov 16, 1965Quinn & Co Inc K JShoe shining enveloped pad
US3247009 *Jun 27, 1963Apr 19, 1966Franey Orville AMethod of making wiping cloth
US4202139 *Apr 6, 1978May 13, 1980Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyConformable hand sanding pad
US5454779 *Apr 12, 1994Oct 3, 1995The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaDevices and methods for external chest compression
US5613897 *Aug 8, 1995Mar 25, 1997Thompson, Jr.; John P.Foot-pad floor cleaning device
US5815876 *Feb 28, 1997Oct 6, 1998Overseth; Elmo R.Apparatus for cleaning and polishing a surface
US5943792 *Oct 16, 1998Aug 31, 1999Powell; Douglas S.Footwear traction device
US5947807 *Jun 1, 1998Sep 7, 1999Overseth; Elmo R.Apparatus for cleaning and polishing a surface
US6013323 *Oct 30, 1998Jan 11, 2000Klayder; Donna W.Silicone gel waxes and silicone gel protectants
US6017351 *Nov 17, 1998Jan 25, 2000Street; Vernon D.Cosmetic method for removing detritus and foreign matter from the epidermis and a cosmetic abrasive pad for scrubbing the epidermis
US9038871 *Feb 23, 2012May 26, 2015Kevin T. AtwoodGlove construction and kit for carrying outfitted electronic devices
US20030106812 *Jan 10, 2003Jun 12, 2003Wilkman Michael A.Impregnated wipe package with features improving handling and reducing transdermal migration
US20040237235 *Jun 1, 2004Dec 2, 2004Visioli Donna LynnMultipurpose disposable applicator
US20110183589 *Jul 28, 2011Samuel YuUniversal interface pad conversion band
US20130219584 *Feb 23, 2012Aug 29, 2013Kevin T. AtwoodGlove construction and kit for carrying outfitted electronic devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.94, 15/209.1, 15/227
International ClassificationA47L13/19, A47L13/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/19
European ClassificationA47L13/19