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Publication numberUS2071525 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1937
Filing dateMay 10, 1935
Priority dateMay 10, 1935
Publication numberUS 2071525 A, US 2071525A, US-A-2071525, US2071525 A, US2071525A
InventorsJr William H Goldsmith, Frank W Higgins
Original AssigneeJr William H Goldsmith, Frank W Higgins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weaver's knotter
US 2071525 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1937.

w. HIGGINS tr AL WEAVERS KNOTTER Filed May 10, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet l I INVEFTORS;

Feb. '23, 1937. F. w. HlGGlN ET AL WEAVER S KNOTTER 5 Sheets-Sheet '2 Filed May 10, 1935 1 IVENTQRS! Feb. 23, 1937.

F. W. HIGGINSv ET AL WEAVERS KNOTTER Filed May 10, 1935 s Sheets-Sheet 5 ATT EY,

Feb. 23, 1937 F. w. HIGGIN'S ET AL WEAVERS KNOTTER Fild May 10, 1955 "5 Sheets-Sheet 4 NVENTORSZ Feb. 23; 1937- F. w. HIGGINS ET AL WEAVER S KNOTTER File d May 10, 1955 5 Sheets-She' s 1 VENTORS:

Patented Feb. 23, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WEAVER/S KNOTT'ER Application May 10, 1935, Serial No. 20,760

24 Claims.

This invention relates to implements of the type commonly known as weavers knotters.

These devices, as thevname implies, are designed to tie a weavers knot, and they are used very widely in connection with a large variety of operations in the textile industry, and especially in the preparation of warp yarn for weaving. While devices of this character have been in use for many years, their range of usefulness has been limited by the fact that they leave relatively long ends or tails on the knot. Consequently, they cannot be employed satisfactorily in many operations where closely cut ends are necessary in order to allow the yarn or threads so tied to feed through the guiding means of certain machines. In such cases a handtied and trimmed knot must be made;

The present invention deals with these conditions, and it aims to improve weaver s knotters with a view to producing results substantially equivalent to those produced by hand.

The nature of the invention will be readily understood fro-m the following description when read inconnection with the accompanying drawings, and the novel features will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 is a plan view of a knotter constructed in accordance with this invention;

i Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the knotter illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an elevation of the opposite side of the knotter shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 is a front end view of said knotter;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation illustrating the manner in which the cutter is operated;

Fig. 6 is a side view of the worm for operating the bill;

Fig. '7 is a sectional view, partly in elevation, illustrating the manner in which the stop on the worm operates;

Fig. 8 is a plan view, somewhat diagrammatic in character, showing the bill with reference to the cutters and the knot positioning means just before the threads are severed;

Fig. 9 is a perspective .view showing the positions of the parts just before the knot is cut;

Fig. 10 is a side view of a quadrant with an adjustable cam lug thereon;

Figs; 11 and 12 are side and end views, respectively, of another form of bill cutter;

Fig. 13 is a perspective View showing an adjustabie form of knot positioning post; and

Figs. 14 and 15 are perspective views illustrating the manner in which this invention may be applied to other forms of weavers knotters.

The drawings show the invention as applied t0l a knotter of the general character described and claimed in United States Letters Patent No. 5 1,974,846, dated September 25, 1934, granted to Norman Cook, and an understanding of the operation of the present instrument will be facilitated by a reading of said patent. So far as those features common to the instrument shown in the patent and that disclosed in this application are concerned, only a brief description is necessary. In order to facilitate an understanding of the relationship between the two instruments, the parts common to them have been designated b the same numerals used in the patent.

The knotter shown comprises a support II) to which the usual hand strap (not shown) is secured, and a frame I3 mounted on the support and carrying a pivot stud l2 on which the quadrant M is mounted to swing, this quadrant being provided with the usual thumb piece or trigger II. Meshing with the teeth of the quadrant are the threads of a worm or screw H, on the forwardend of which the knotting bill I8 is supported. This bill is arrangedto be opened and closed during the rotation of the spindle by the contact of the shank portion of the movable member of the bill with the walls of the eccentrically arranged opening I9, Fig. 9, in the front cross arm of the, frame l3. At the right-hand side of the instrument, as ordinarily held in the hand, a stationary plate 30, best shown in Fig. 3, is secured rigidly to the frame by screws 2929, and another plate 28 is mounted between the plate 3|] and the frame for horizontal sliding movement longitudinally of the frame, this plate being guided on the screws above mentioned. Near its forward end the plate or slide 28 is provided with two slots 33 and 34 to receive the threads, and the latter of these slots is arranged to register approximately when the instrument is in its normal position with another thread guiding slot 32 in the plate 33. At a very early point in the cycle of operations of the instrument the slide 28 is moved backwardly to clamp the threads between the two plates 28 and 39, this movement being produced by a cam slot. 22 in the quadrant I4 acting on a roll carried by the lever 26 which is fulcrumed on the frame and has an upper end extending into a slot 21 in an inwardly bent and forked projection extending downwardly from the slide 28. This construction is like that in the Cook patent above designated. At the opposite side of the frame an arm 36 is supported parallel to the plates 28 and 30, 55

and it is pivoted on a pin or post 31 to swing toward and from the bill. Normally it is held at the inward limit of its movement by means of a coiled spring 38, Fig. 3. This arm also carries thread clamping members. That is, a slide is mounted to reciprocate longitudinally at the inner side of the arm 36, and it has an upright portion 45, Figs. 1 and 2, which is partly separated from the main body of the slide by deep slots indicated at and 41, respectively. The extreme forward end of the arm 36 is turned at right angles (see Figs. 2 and 4), and a spring is secured to the front face of this angular portion and is bent downwardly to extend into the notch 41, but is spaced slightly from the forward edge of the member 45 so as to provide a slot 4?, Fig. 2, between these parts into which the thread may be guided. Another member 6| Fig. 2, made of resilient metal is secured rigidly to the side of the arm and is provided with a downwardly extending spring portion 62 which lies in the notch 50 but is normally spaced slightly from the rearward edge of this notch. At the beginning of the operative movement of the quadrant I 4, an internal cam on this member operates through the lever 53, Fig. 2, as in the Cook construction, and the pin 5| engaged by said lever, to move the slide 45 forward, this movement serving to close the slots 50 and 41 and therefore to pinch any threads or yarns which have previously been located in these respective slots. At a later point in the swinging movement of the quadrant, the cam 23 engages the roll 52, Fig. 3, which is carried by the extension 52 of the slide 45 and swings the arm 3B,-together with the parts mounted on it, outwardly away from the bill, this movement continuing until it is stopped by the engagement of the finger 63, Fig. l, with the rearward cross piece of the frame [3, it being understood that the finger 63 is rigidly secured to the arm 36.

So far as the features above described are concerned, the present construction resembles very closely that shown and described in the patent above designated, and reference may be made to this patent for a more detailed description and operation of these parts. Those members designated by the reference numerals up to 55 correspond, in general, to similar members designated by the same numerals in the Cook patent. It may be noted, however, that the thread clamps carried by the swinging arm 36 differ slightly from those shown in the aforesaid patent and that there are other minor differences in details.

So far as the mere operations of tying the knot are concerned, the instrument shown operates very similarly to the Cook knotter shown in the patent above mentioned. At the beginning of these operations the two threads to be tied together are guided across the instrument from left to right, as it appears in Fig. 4, with the forward thread entered in the slots 41 and 33, and the rearward thread in the slots 50 and 32. The two horns 35 and 64, integral with the slide 28, assist in guiding these threads into the proper slots at the right-hand side of the device and down upon the neck of the bill which, at this time, is in a vertical position. During the first revolution of the bill both the slides 28 and 45 are moved forward and pinch the threads at opposite sides of the bill. Further movement of the quadrant rotates the bill to complete the tying of the knot, and at substantially the end of this cycle the arm 36 is swung outwardly to tighten the knot and pull it off the bill, all as in the Cook knotter. In

this, as well as in all other prior knotters, however, there has been no positive control of the position that the knot will finally take, or of the distance of the knot proper from the tail end cutting members. One thread is always out in the bill and the end held while the knot is pulled up, and the other end is cut during this pulling up or tightening operation. The loops in the knot thus are free to travel along the thread toward one clamping point or the other after at least one thread has been cut and while the knot is being pulled up. Consequently, in these prior knotters, so far as we have been able to learn, there is no way of predetermining or controlling the lengths of the cut ends.

The present invention differs radically from these prior constructions in that it affords such a control. In the instrument here illustrated the knot is tied, tightened, and positioned in a predetermined location in the instrument. Then the waste threads are cut at a predetermined distance from the knot. This distance can be made very short so that the result can be made to closely approximate a hand trimmed knot.

In the arrangement shown in the drawings for producing these results, the knot positioning means comprises a post 65, best shown in Fig. 9, but illustrated also in several of the other figures. This member includes an upright portion lying directly in line between the slot 50 and the bill and a U-shaped bottom portion 65, one arm of which is secured by a screw 56, Fig. 4, to the forward extension at of one of the members of the frame l3. This post, therefore, is held in a fixed but adjustable position between the bill and the 1 forward part of the swinging arm 36. In drawing the threads to be tied together into the instrument, the rear thread slides down past the upper portion of the post and comes to rest on the shoulder b, Figs. 2 and 9. After the knot has been tied and the rearward thread has been cut in the bill, as shown diagrammatically in Fig. 8, this end y is still held by the bill while the arm 36 swings away. The knot is tightened primarily by the pull exerted on the forward thread section as by l the parts that grip it in the slot 4?, while the end y of the rearward thread is still held by the bill. There is still, however, some tension exerted on the two thread sections w and 2 by pinching of the latter in the slot 33, Fig. 9, and of the former in the slot 50, this tension permitting a controlled slip of the threads. During the movement of the arm away from the bill, the knot is pulled ofi the bill, tightened, as just described, and the two thread sections to and x which are to be preserved and which are now tied together, are caught by and tightened around the post 85. This action, together with the pull on the knot exerted by the bill and the parts that grip the thread :1: in the slot 47', positions the knot against the post 65 and locates it at substantially the forward edge of this post, as shown in Figs. 8 and 9. In both of these figures the knot has been shown spaced slightly from the post in such a position as it would occupy before being completely drawn up. In Fig. 8 the distances between the post and the bill are somewhat exaggerated. VJhile the parts are held in this relationship the threads y and e are out between the post and the bill.

The shears or cutter are carried by a slide 67, Figs. 1 and 5, mounted on two guide screws 58- 68 threaded into the frame $3. One cutter blade 78 is secured rigidly to the slide, while the other blade H is pivoted on the stud 12 carried by said slide. Both blades are slotted to receive a stationarypin 13 which is secured in theforward end of "the frame extension a. It will be evident from an inspection of Fig. 5 that as the slide 6'! moves toward the right, the blade 1!! will move with it, and the blade H will be swungby the pin 13 in a counter-clockwise direction'until its edge overlaps and swings along the edge of the blade 10 in shearing relationship to thelatter.

This relative movement of the blades is produced by the quadrant E4, the latter being equipped with a block M, Figs. 3 and 5, adjustably secured thereto by ascrew I5 which is arranged to engage an arm 15 integral with the slide 57 and extending under the bill screw ll, as shown in Figs. 1 and 5, into the slot in the quadrant where it will be struck by the block I l at the desired point in the cycle of operations of the instrument. The adjustability of this block on the quadrant permits adjustment of the timing of the operation of the cutter. A spring 11, Fig. 1, acts on the arm 76 to hold the slide 51 yieldingly in its rearward or normal position.

The cutting operation should be performed while the bill is in its horizinal position, as shown in Fig. 9, with its tip closely adjacent to the bite of the shears. As just explained, this operation involves the forward movement of the slide 61, and, consequently, of both cutter blades. In order to maintain this relationship between the bill and the cutter, the bill screw or shaft is equipped with a collar 18, Figs. 1, 6, and 7, provided with a stop shoulder 80, which, when the bill has revolved through the desired angle and has arrived in the position shown in Fig. 9, after making slightly more than two revolutions, en-

gages a hump 8|, Fig. 5, on the quadrant l4 and definitely prevents further rotation of the bill.

his engagement takes place while the slide 5? is moving forward and after that portion of the forward edge of the blade 10 in horizontal alinement with the axis of the bill has moved up into the same vertical plane with the bill. Thereafter the bill is moved forward in unison with the cutter due to the action of the teeth l6 of the quadrant on the threads of the bill screw in cooperation with the engagement of the shoulder 80 with the part BI of the quadrant. Usually the parts are so timed that the Waste portions of the threads running from the knot to the bill and to the slot 33, respectively, are severed by the cutter during this additional movement.

Upon the relase of the thumb piece I land the return of the quadrant to its initial position by the spring 2|, Fig. 3, the bill screw first slides back to its normal position due to the action of the spring 82, Fig. 1, and then makes its backward rotation to its initial position. In order to hold the bill screw against forward. sliding movement until the shoulder 80 engages the part 85, a latch 83, Figs. 2 and 3, is pivoted on the frame immediately below the rearward end of the shaft, and is provided with a shoulder 84, Fig. 3, to engage a collar 85 free on the shaft but held against movement axially of it, a spring 86 acting on the latch to hold it in its operative position. As the part 8! of the quadrant comes into position to engage the shoulder 80, another portion Bl of the quadrant strikes the lower edge of the latch 83 and rocks the latch on its pivot far enough to disengage the shoulder 84 from the collar 85, thus releasing the bill screw shaft and allowing this shaft to slide forward in the manner above described. During this movement the cam shaped edge of the tail of the bill cutter slides over the wall of the eccentricopening in which it revolvesand gives this cutter an added closing movement.

During the rotation of the bill for the purpose of making the knot, the rearmost thread becomes looped around the bill, and in order to facilitate the disengagement of this loop from the bill, the rearward edge of its movable member is bevelled, as shown at c, in Fig. 8, and a cam 85, Figs. 8 and 9, is located immediately beside the path of revolution of the bill. This cam consists of a pressed metal part snapped over the rim of the stationary member 20, as shown in Figs. 4 and 9, and its extreme forward edge through the region between the bill and the post lies slightly in advance of the corner cl, Fig. 8, on the bill cutter. Consequently, as the bill revolves, this cam edge cooperates with the tension on the rearward thread-to continuously force the loop over the point d of the bill cutter-and moves the thread on to the inclined surface 0 where the pull on the thread subsequently effects the shedding of the loop from the bill. This arrangement causes the thread to wind around the heel portion of the bill instead of around the shank.

ofthe bill screw.

Essentially the same result may be obtained by providing the movable element of the bill with a combination cam and cutter 8'! shown in Figs. 11 and 12, which compels the continuous shedding of the loop in the manner above described.

The post 65- with its vertical edge to guide the rearward thread and its shoulder b to limit the level to which the thread can drop, also assists in controlling the manipulation and positioning of the thread during the knotting operation.

It will be observed that in this instrument the knot is made, pulled up tightly, and positioned before the waste threads, that is, those at the right of the knot, as shown in Fig. 9, are severed, and these threads then are'cut at a pointclose to the knot but between it and the. bill. Also, that the threads and the knot are kept under definite control during these operations. Thus the lengths of the cut ends or tails left on the knot are definitely predetermined. By adjusting the cutter laterally toward or from the post through the use. of shims between the frame and the cutter or its supporting. slide, the lengths of these tails can be adjusted, as desired. Or,

the post may be adjusted laterally toward or .1:

from the scissors to accomplish thesame object. In either event, the post acts as a gaging device and serves to measure the distance between the taut knot and the scissors, the threads which are to be preserved being wrappedaround this post, while the waste threads, or those that are to be discarded, lying at the opposite side of the knot. -Thus the invention provides an instrument which will make a closely trimmed knot having all the advantages of a knot made by hand. So far aswe are aware, this result'has never beenaccompiished heretofore in anyway other than by hand.

For the purpose of adjusting the post 65 laterally, it may be made in two pieces; as shown in'Fig. l3, overlapped upon each other at the bottom of the post and secured together by the screw and slot connection 93. Forward and back--- ward adjustment of this post may be made by loosening the screw 66 and swinging the pcst'on the shaft of this screw into the desired position and then tightening the screw. It may be here noted, also, that the width of the post at the point where the threads partially encircle itshould be sufiicient to take up the slack released when the knot slips off the bill. This slack is substantially the length of one turn or loop of thread wrapped around the heel of the bill, this loop being released when the knot is pulled oif the bill. While some of the advantages of this invention could be obtained if the post were not present, nevertheless the post is of great assistance in positioning the knot and therefore in predetermining the lengths of the tails or ends left on the knot. It will also be observed that the thread held by the bill is out twice, the first cutting operation being performed by the bill in order to prevent interference with the knot forming operations, and the second out being made by the scissors or cutter for the purpose of cutting both the ends y and .2, Fig. 8, at the desired distance from the knot It.

It is sometimes desirable to be able to adjust the timing of the outward movement of the swinging arm 36 with reference to other operations in the cycle. This may be accomplished by making the cam 23 separate from the quadrant l4 and on a part secured to but adjustable with reference to the quadrant. Such a construction is shown in Fig. 10 in which a lever 98 is mounted on the quadrant and carries a cam 23' designed to. perform the same functions as the cam 23. The lever is adjustable around the axis of the pivot stud l2 on which the quadrant swings, and it is provided with a slot 9| curved about this stud to receive a screw 92 for securing the lever, and consequently the cam lug 23, in difierent relationships to the quadrant.

Preferably the trigger or thumb piece H is secured to the quadrant M by a bolt 94, Figs. 2 and 3, so that the thumb piece can be adjusted horizontally with reference to the quadrant. This is of advantage in enabling different operators to set the thumb piece in the position most convenient for them to use.

While we have herein shown and described a preferred embodiment of our invention, it will be understood that the invention may be embodied in other forms without departing from the spirit or scope thereof, and that the invention is equally as applicable to other knotters as to the particular type of knotter with which it is here disclosed. For example; in the form of knotter shown in Patent No. 1,965,023, dated July 3, 1934, two bills 9595 are used, as shown in Fig. 14, both the waste threads being cut by the bills and the knot subsequently being pulled up and tightened by the outward movement of the arm 98. Cutters l and H may be positioned, as shown in said figure, to sever these waste threads between the knot and the bills. If desired, also, a post 65' may be included in the machine to assist in positioning the knot as in the instrument shown in the other figures.

Also, the invention may be applied to the type of kno-tter shown in Patent No. 1,599,160, granted September 7, 1926, in some such manner as that illustrated in Fig. 15. Here the thread tightening arm 91, corresponding to that shown at 48 in the patent, has been moved over to the lefthand side of the bill. As it pulls up the threads and tightens the knot, and while the single cut end is still held in the bill, the cutter blades 98 and 99 are relatively moved to sever the waste threads just below the knot. As shown, the former of these cutter blades is mounted rigidly on a bar I00 sliding backward and forward in the instrument and arranged to be moved forward by one of the forks l0! of the thumb piece or lever, both blades being carried forward with the slide and the pivoted blade 99 engaging a stationary pin I02 which serves to swing it into shearing relationship to the opposite blade. A stationary cam I03 engages the blade 99 on the backward movement of the shears to open them, the spring I04 being provided to. move the slide I00 and the shears backwardly.

Having thus described our invention, what we desire to claim as new is:

1. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for tying together two threads and drawing up and tightening the knot, of mechanism for simultaneously severing both threads which are to be discarded at one side of said knot after the knot has been tightened.

2. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for tying together two threads and drawing up and tightening the knot, of mechanism for simultaneously severing both threads which are to be discarded at one side of said knot, means for positioning the knot ata predetermined distance from the severing mechanism, and actuating means for said instrumentalities and said mechanism.

3. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for tying together two threads and drawing up and tightening the knot, of mechanism for simultaneously severing both threads which are to be discarded at one side of said knot and at a predetermined distance from the knot, and actuating means for said instrumentalities and said mechanism constructed and arranged to cause said severing means to cut the threads after the knot has been tightened.

4. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of means for cutting the threads between the bill and the knot.

5. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of means for cutting the waste threads at a predetermined distance from the completed knot to leave tails of predetermined length extending from the knot.

6. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of means for cutting the waste threads at a predetermined distance from both the bill and the knot, and a common actuating device for said instrumentalities and said cutting means.

7. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tightening instrumentalities, of means cooperating with said instrumentalities for positioning the completed and tightened knot in a predetermined location in the instrument.

8. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tightening instrumentalities, of means cooperating with said instrumentalities for positioning the completed knot in a predetermined location in the instrument, and mechanism for cutting the waste threads at one side of the knot and at a predetermined distance from said knot to leave tails of predetermined length extending from the knot.

9. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tightening instrumentalities, of means cooperating with said instrumentalities for positioning the completed knot in a predetermined location in the instrument, and means for cut- Cal ting the waste threads at one side' of the knot and 'at'a predetermined distance from said'knot to leave tails of predetermined length extending from the knot, said positioning and cutting means being relatively adjustable to vary the distance from the knot at which said threads will be severed by said cutting mechanism.

10. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tightening instrumentalities, of a post mounted in the knotter and cooperating with said instrumentalities to position the completed knot in a predetermined'location in the instrument, and additional mechanism for cutting the waste threads at points closely-beside said post.

11. In a weavers knotter, the-combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of means cooperating with said instrumentalities to position the completed and tightened knot at a predetermined distance from said bill, and mechanism for cutting the waste threads at points between said knot and the bill.

12. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of a post in said instrument around which the knotted thread is tightened and which cooperates with said means to position the completed knot, and mechanism for cutting the threads to be discarded at a predetermined distance from Said post.

13. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means cooperating with it to loop a thread around it in forming a knot and for drawing up and tightening the knot, of a thread guiding cam closely associated with said bill to cause the tension on the threads to continuously shed the loop from the back of the bill.

14. In a weavers knotter, the combination of a rotatable bill, a support for said bill, an actuating element for revolving said bill, an arm at one side of the knotter pivotally -mounted for lateral swinging movement toward and from said bill; means for operatively guiding and gripping the threads to be tied together and cooperating with said arm and said bill to draw up and tighten the knot, means for swinging said arm away from said bill at a predetermined point in the knot tying operation, means cooperating with the aforesaid arm to locate the knot in substantially a predetermined position in the knotter, and additional means arranged to be operated by said actuating element for severing the waste threads at a predetermined distance from the knot.

15. In a weavers knotter, the combination of a rotatable bill, a support for said bill, an actuating element for revolving said bill, an arm at one side of the knotter pivotally mounted for lateral swinging movement toward and from said bill, means for operatively guiding and gripping the threads to be tied together and cooperating with said arm and said bill to draw up and tighten the knot, a post between said bill and said arm cooperating with said means to position the knot in 7 substantially a predetermined location in the knotter, and means for cutting the waste threads between the knot and said bill.

16. In a weavers knotter, the combination of a rotatable bill, a support for said bill, an actuating element for revolving said bill, an arm at one side of the knotter pivotally mounted for lateral swinging movement toward and from said bill, means for operatively guiding and gripping the threads to be tied together and cooperating with said arm and said bill to draw up and tighten the knot, a post betweensaidbill and said arm cooperating with said means to position the knot in substantially a predetermined location in the knotter, a cutter operative while the knot is position'ed to sever waste threads between the knot andsaid bill, and means for operating saidcutter in a predetermined time relationship to the movements of said bill and said arm.

17. In a weavers knotter, the combination of a rotatable bill, a support for said bill, an actuating element for revolving said bill, an arm at one side of the knotter pivotally mounted for lateral swinging movement toward and from said bill, m'eans'for operatively guiding and gripping the threads to be tied together and coopera'ting with said arm and said bill to draw up and tighten the knot, means for swinging said arm away from said bill at a predetermined point in the knot tying operation, means cooperating with the aforesaid a rotatable bill, a quadrant for revolving said bill, a predetermined position in the knotter, additional means arranged to be operated by said actuating element for cutting the waste threads at a predetermined distance from said knot, and means operable to adjust the relative timing of the operations of said cutting means, said arm and said bill.

18. In a weavers knotter, the combination of a rotatable bill, a quadrant for revolving said bill, an arm at one side of the knotter mounted for lateral swinging movement toward and from said bill, supporting means for said parts, thread guiding and gripping devices mounted in cooperative relationship to said bill at opposite sides of it, certain of said parts being carried by said arm, means arranged to be operated by said quadrant for swinging said arm away from said bill at a predetermined point in the knot tying operations, a post mounted in the knotter between said bill and-said arm in position to catch the threads released by the bill after being tied together and to cooperate with said guiding and gripping devices in positioning the knot in a predetermined location in the instrument, thread cutting means mounted in said instrument between said post and said bill for cutting the waste threads between said bill and said knot, and connections between said cutting means and said quadrant for causing the quadrant to operate the cutting means.

19. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities constructed and arranged to tie together two threads by means of a knot and including means for drawing up and tightening the knot, of mechanism for simultaneously cutting both threads which are to be discarded at one side of said knot, and actuating means for said instrumentalities and said mechanism constructed and arranged to cause said cutting means to cut said threads after the knot has been tightened.

20. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including a revolving bill and means cooperating with it to draw up and tighten the knot while one of the threads is gripped in the bill, of means for cutting said thread between the bill and the knot.

21. In a weavers knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities constructed and arranged to tie together two threads by means of a knot and including a bill and means for drawing up and tightening the knot while one of the waste thread ends is gripped in the bill, of means for cutting the thread so gripped between the bill and the knot and for simultaneously cutting the other waste thread extending from the knot.

22. In a knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for holding the waste threads at one side of said knot while the knot is pulled up and. tightened, of means for cutting both of said waste threads close to the knot after it has been so pulled up and tightened.

23. In a knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for holding the waste threads at one side of said knot while the knot is pulled up and tightened, of means for cutting one of said waste threads in connection with said knot tying operation, and additional means for cutting both of said threads at substantially predetermined distances from the knot after the knot has been tightened and thus to trim said waste ends close to the knot.

' 24. In a knotter, the combination with knot tying instrumentalities including means for pulling up and tightening the knot, of a post mounted in the knotter and against which said instrumentalities pull the thread in tightening the knot, said post cooperating with said instrumentalities to position the completed knot in a predetermined location in the instrument, and means for cutting the waste threads extending from said knot at predetermined distances from said knot after the knot has been so tightened and positioned and thereby to trim the waste ends close to the knot.

FRANK W. HIGGINS. WILLIAM H. GOLDSMITH, JR.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

Patent No. 2,071,525. February 23, 1937.

FRANK W. HIGGINS, ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 5, second column, line 20, claim 17, strike out the words and comma "a rotatable bill, a quadrant for revolving said bill, and insert instead arm to locate the com leted knot in substantially; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 23rd day of March, A. D. 1937.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4714281 *Jan 2, 1987Dec 22, 1987Peck Richard MDevice and method for tying a twisted clinch knot
DE920119C *Jul 16, 1939Nov 11, 1954Schlafhorst Co MaschfVorrichtung zum Verknuepfen zweier in entgegengesetzte Richtungen weisender Fadenenden
Classifications
U.S. Classification289/3
International ClassificationB65H69/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65H69/04, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H69/04