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Publication numberUS2072690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1937
Filing dateDec 30, 1933
Priority dateDec 30, 1933
Publication numberUS 2072690 A, US 2072690A, US-A-2072690, US2072690 A, US2072690A
InventorsDonald G Smellie
Original AssigneeHoover Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner
US 2072690 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 2, 1937. D. G. SMELLIE SUCTION CLEANER Filed Dec. 50, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet l Donald 6: Jmellie ATTORNEY March 2, 1937. D. G SMELLIE 2,072,690

I SUCTION CLEANER Filed Dec. 30, 1935 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Donald 6. 51220111? F 13 BY ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 2, 1937 uN rEo STATES PATENT OFFICE Hoover Company, North Canton,

poration of Ohio Ohio, a cor Application December 30, 1938, Serial No. 704.821

ztclaims.

The present invention relates to suction cleaners in general and particularly to a new and improved combination. in a suction cleaner, of a floor-cleaning unit and dusting tools. More specifically the invention comprises a suction cleaner in which the attachment of the dusting tools to the floor-cleaning unit automatically results in an increase in the suction of the cleaner.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved suction cleaner con-- struction. It is a further object to provide, in suction cleaner floor-cleaning units and dusting tools, improvements which insure maximum suction ,controllable at the working end of the dusting tools when they are used. A still further object is the provision of an improved electrical circuit in a suction cleaner in combination with improved dusting tools which function to provide, and cause to be provided, maximum suction at the end of the dusting tool hose when the dusting tools are used. Still another object is the provision, in a suction cleaner floor-cleaning unit, of contacts in the electrical circuit which are selectively operated by contacts carried by the dusting tool connection and the'cover dusting tool combination in which the multi-.

speed motor oi the suction-creating means automatically operates on its high speed circuit when the dusting tools are attached. These and other more specific objects will appear upon reading the following specification and claims and upon considering in connection therewith the attached drawings to which they relate.

Referring now to the drawings in which preferred embodiments of the present invention are 0 disclosed:

Figure l is a view in perspective of a suction cleaner with dusting tools attached thereto;

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic showing of the electrical circuit of the cleaner shown in Figure l;

45 Figure 3 is a partial bottom view of the cleaner with the dusting tools removed therefrom and the cleaner ready for on-the-floor operation;

Figure 4 is a partial section upon the line 4-4 of Figure 3;

50 Figure 5 is a section through the dusting tool nozzle upon the line 5-5 of Figure 1;

Figure 6 is a partial bottom view of the suction cleaner with the converter end of the dusting tool unit connected to the machine. and the ma- 5:; chine ready for ofi-the-fioor operation;

Figure 7 is a section upon the line 'l-I of Figure 3;

Figure 8 is a section upon the line 88 of Figure 6;

,Figure 9 is a section upon the line 9-9 of 5 Figure 8 showing the contacts operated by the dusting tool unit;

Figure 10 is a broken showing of a suction cleaner to which is attached a dusting tool unit provided with a positively driven agitating means .10 at the dusting tool hose nozzle;

Figure 11 is a partial bottom view showing the cover plate attached to the machine of Figure 10 and the machine ready for on-the-fioor operation; 16

Figure 12 shows a partial bottom view of the modification shown in Figure 10;

Figure 13 is a diagrammatic showing of the electrical circuit of the modification of the invention found in Figures 10 to 12, inclusive; 20

Figure 14 is a modified electrical circuit for the invention in which the speed of the driving motor, and accordingly the effective suction, can be controlled by the switch at the end of the dusting tool unit. 25

The present day suction cleaner of modern design is a portable unlt designed for on-the-fioor cleaning, that is. designed for the cleaning of rugs and other fioor coverings. In order to increase the range of usefulness of the unit, how- 0 ever, the cleaner is designed to accommodate, with but slight modification, what is known as a dusting tool unit. This dusting tool unit when connected to the cleaner proper makes the suc-"' tion created thereby efi'ective at a point spaced 35 an appreciable distance from the cleaner. The dusting tool unit usually comprises a converter member adapted to be attached directly to the suction-creating means of the cleaner, a long flexible tube or hose which connects to the con- 40 verter, and a cleaning nozzle or similar member at the end of thehose which is adapted to be applied directly to the article,'such as a drape or a curtain, undergoing cleaning. In the use of the suction cleaner in on-the-fioor' operation, the degree of suction or the suction power, and consequently the air fiow, may be limited necessarily by certainfacfors. The cleaner may be provided. and usually is. with a positive agitating member within the cleaner nozzle which is adapted to contact the surface-covering undergoing cleaning to dislodge the imbedded foreign matter therefrom in the cleaner operation. Often the extent of suction must be limited so that the surface covering undergoing cleaning will not be lifted with too great a force against this agitating member. When the dusting tool unit is used, however, the problems present in on-the-fioor cleaning are not encountered. The maximum available suction is useful at the end of the dusting tool unit and the greater the suction present at that point the greater will be the 'cleaning power of the tool} In the combination on-the-fioor suction cleaner unit and dusting tool unit constructed in accordance with the present invention, the relationship is such that, when the suction cleaner proper is converted for use with dusting tools, the suction of the machine is at least as great as the maximum suction available in on-the-floor cleaning, and in certain modifications is greater. The result is an improved cleaner and dusting tool combination, as will hereinafter be set forth fully.

Referring again to the drawings, and Fig es 1 to 9 inclusive, in particular, a preferred embodiment of the invention is disclosed. The suction cleaner proper is seen to comprise a main casing which includes a nozzle I, a fan chamber 2, and an exhaust outlet 3. This main casing is movably mounted upon front and rear wheels 4 and 5, and a pivoted handle 6 connects thereto by which the operator may propel the machine. An unshown motor of common design is positioned within the motor casing 1 immediately above the fan chamber 2, the extended shaft of which, see Figures '7 and 8, is indicated by the reference character 8. Shaft 8 extends downwardly through the fan chamber 2, in which it carries the fan i3, and therebelow, being provided at its end with a pulley Ill. The end of the air passageway between the fan chamber and the nozzle is formed by the removable cover plate or pulley cover 9 when the machine is arranged for on-thefloor cleaning. A belt ll encircles the pulley iii and extends forwardly through the air passageway to the agitator l2, shown in Figure 1, positioned within the cleaner nozzle. The suction-creating fan, in the operation of the ma chine, is rotated by-the cleaner motor and functions to draw air into the mouth of the nozzle I, through the air passageway to the fan chamber 2, and forces it therefrom through the exhaust outlet 3 into the dust bag M. The incoming current-carrying leads l5, l5 for the motor extend into the cleaner handle 6 at a point near the upper end thereof and near the handle switch l5, traveling therefrom down through the hollow handle to the machine proper. The electrical circuit of the machine of this modification is shown in Figure 2 and will be referred to hereinafter more fully.

Referring to Figure 3 of the drawings in particular, a partial bottom view of the machine in its on-the-floor relationship is shown, and in particular the manually removable cover plate 9 is shown positioned in place thereon. Cover plate 9 is held through being provided at its forward end, which opens to the permanent part of the air passageway from the nozzle I, with forwardly-projecting pins I1, I! which seat within suitable seats in the walls of the air passageway. The rear end of the plate is provided with 2. lug l8 which extends under a manually movable detent l9 which is adapted to be moved to lock the lug in place, or to be moved to permit its displacement together with the cover plate. When the suction cleaner is used in on-the-floor cleaning, cover plate 9 is an integral part of the machine. It is only removed when it is desired acvaeco to convert the cleaner into a unit adapted for oif-the-fioor cleaning.

In order to accomplish the purpose of the invention the electrical circuit of the cleaner is made as illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawings. One of the incoming power leads 15 extends directly to one side of a field winding of the motor 20. In the motor the fields are indicated by the characters 2|, 2| while the armature is indicated by the reference character 22. The second incoming lead I5 is seen to extend to two self-opening movable contacts 'or switches 23 and 24. With the contact 24 closed the lead 25 is placed in the electrical circuit together with the handle switch l6. Referring to Figures 3, 7 and 8 in particular, it is seen that the contacts 23 and 24 are housed within an insulated housing 26 which extends below and at the side of the main casing and in particular of the fan chamber'2, the contacts being positioned immediately adjacent the cover plate 9. The cover plate itself is provided with a transversely projecting arm 21 which extends under the housing 28 and contacts and closes the contact 24, as is clearly seen in Figure 7. The contact 23, which is identical with the contact 24, is shown in closed position in Figures 8 and 9. Each contact is normally open unless forced to the closed position. With the machine so connected electrically the motor is controlled from the handle switch l6 and the machine is adapted to be used in onthe-fioor cleaning.

To convert the suction cleaner to a unit adapted for off-the-floor cleaning, it is only necessary to remove the cover plate 9 and to insert in place thereof the dusting tool converter 28, see Figure 6, which is secured in place relative to the fan chamber 2 in a manner similar to that in which the plate 9 is held. The converter member is provided with a rearwardly extending lug 29 which is also held by the manually operable detent I9, as in the case of the cover plate. The converter, however, does not have the forwardly extending pins l1, H, but instead is provided with one or more shoulders of the type indicated at 28a which extend into and contact the rearward end of the permanent part of the passageway from the nozzle and cooperate with the lug 29 for the purpose specified. Converter 28 is formed with a concave central portion which mates with the eye of the fan chamber 2 and is interiorly connected with that chamber. A transversely extending tube or passageway extends from the central portion under the contact-containing housing 26 and is provided with a raised shoulder 28b which contacts the contact 23 and forces it to the closed position. To the passage of the converter 28 is attached the elongated flexible tubular hose 30 of a well known design, the hose being removably held by means of a spring-pressed detent, indicated generally by the reference character 3|, in a manner which forms no part of the present invention and which is well known in the art. At the opposite end of the hose and similarly attached thereto by a spring-pressed detent 32, see Figure 5, is the dusting tool nozzle 33 which is adapted to contact articles undergoing cleaning. The nozzle 33 is shown in Figure 5 to be provided with a rubber mouth 34 on which is mounted a brush 35.

As it is desirable to be able to control the cleaning motor from the end of the dusting tool hose, thereby eliminating the necessity of returning to the machine proper, a suitable switch 33 is mounted at that point. Leads 31. 3'I,which extend through the walls of the hose 36, each end in a contact 36 which is adapted to contact an L-shaped double-ended contact 33 carried by the passageway of converter 23, which in turn contacts a contact 43a suitably mounted within the housing 26 at the side of the fan chamber 2. The provision of a plurality of contacts between the leads 31, 31 and the source of electric current makes possible either the detachment of the hose 3!! from the converter member 23 or the detachment of the converter from the machine proper.

The electric circuit including the leads 31, 31 and the switch 36 is shown diagrammatically in Figure 2, the contacts 33, 33 and 40 being indicated only generally. The contacts 33 are indicated at 30a and b, the former being a single contact while the latter is a double contact. These contacts are clearly shown in Figure 4. The contact 23, which is closed by the dusting tool converter when in place, is connected by a conductor ll to contacts 460, 33 and 33, and through lead 31 to switch 36. The return lead 31 on the dusting tool is connected through contacts 38, 39 and b to a lead 32 which is connected to one side of the motor field 2|, and to lead 43 connected to a resistance R in parallel therewith.

, In the operation of the suction cleaner with dusting tools, therefore, the attachment of the dusting tool converter 23 closes the contact 23 which in turn places the switch 36 at the end of the dusting tool hose in the electrical circuit.

' Simultaneously a resistant unit R is placed in the electrical circuit which was omitted therefrom when the machine was used in on-the-floor cleaning. The result is that when the switch 36 at the end of the dusting tool unit is closed the speed of motor rotation is greater than when the cleaner was used in on-the-floor cleaning, and as a result high suction is present at the dusting tool nozzle 33.

Referring now to Figures 10 to 13, inclusive, a second preferred embodiment of the invention is disclosed which differs from that already de-' scribed in that a positive beating or agitating element 60 is provided within the dusting tool nozzle 33 which is driven by a vibrator 6|, also carried by the nozzle. In the general construction of the suction cleaner and the dusting tool unit, including the converter, and the contacts, no material departure is made from that found in the first embodiment. Two contacts 23 and 24 are again used but it is found necessary to provide three each of contacts 36, 33 and 40. because of the fact that three leads through the dusting tool hose are necessary in order that both the cleaner motor and the vibrating unit may be controlled by the three position dusting tool switch, as is clearly shown in Figure 10. The contacts 40 are each single in. the present embodiment, however. A complete description of this embodiment will not be'given, but it is believed that the invention will be readily understood from the drawings, the same reference characters a being used to indicate the same parts as in the previous embodiment. Reference will be made to Figure 13, however, in which a diagrammatic showing of the electrical circuit of the present embodiment is disclosed.

Referring now to Figure 13 in particular it is noted that the handle switch I6 is a two-position switch to make possible the running of the cleaner motor at either high speed or low speed when in use in on-the-floor cleaning. Lead 26 is divided after passing the switch It into leads 26a and 26b. Lead 26a connects the switch to the outside of the field 2| while lead 25b is connected to a tap on the field. Obviously with the lead 250. in the circuit the speed of rotation of the motor will be less than with the switch so positioned that lead 23b is in the circuit. 'Ihe cleaner is accordingly adapted for two speed operation when in use in on-the-floor cleaning.

With the suction cleaner used in combination with the dusting tools the contact 23 is closed by the converter and the vibrator II and the three position switch 36 at the end of the dusting tool hose are connected in the electrical circuit. The switch 36 may be positioned in an open position so that the machine is inoperative; it

may be positioned so that the vibrator II is omitted from the electrical circuit but current passes through the cleaner motor; or it may be positioned so that both the vibrator and the cleaner motor are in the electrical circuit. It is noted that in the present embodiment a lead 60, which connects directly to an incoming power lead I5, extends through contacts 36, 33 and III into the dusting tool hose and directly to the vibrator 5|. This makes possible the use of the vibrator on full line'voltage as the closing of the switch 36 for vibrator operation connects the opposite side of the vibrator to the contact 23, by way of contacts 38, 39 and 40 of course, and to the second incoming power lead l6. Still another important distinction lies in the fact the lead 42 which connects switch 36 to one side of the cleaner motor cuts out a greater number of field turns than does the lead 25b, and accordingly the speed of motor rotation is greater when the dusting tools are used than when the motor is used at high speed in on-the-floor cleaning.

Referring now to Figure 14 a schematic showing of a third electrical connection for the present invention is disclosed. In this embodiment the dusting tool switch 36 is a two-speed switch and the connection is such that the cleaner motor may run at either high speed or low speed when the dusting tools are attached. To accomplish this function it has been necessary to provide an additional lead 31 and divide lead 32 into leads 42a and 42b which contact the same taps of the field as do the leads 25a and 25b from the handle switch IS. The resistance unit found in the electrical circuit disclosed in Figure 2 has been omitted and in the present embodiment speed variation is obtained by using different taps on the field winding, the speed control being possible from either the handle switch or the dusting tool switch depending upon whether the cleaner is used in on-the-floor or ofl-the-floor cleaning, as disclosed.

I claim:

1. In a suction cleaner, a movable cleaner unit adapted for on-the-floor cleaning including a driving motor having a high speed and a low speed circuit, a removable member forming a part of the body of said cleaner when used in onthe-floor cleaning and serving to prevent the attachment of a dusting tool unit and including means to close one of said circuits, said cleaner unitbeing adapted to be connected to a dusting tool unit for off-the-floor cleaning with said member removed.

2. In a suction cleaner, a casing including an air passageway, suction-creating means in said casing open to said passageway and including an electric motor having a plurality of circuits for multi-speed operation, means on said casing adapted to be selectively operated to close said circuits, a part oi' said casing forming said air passageway being removable to permit the attachment of a dusting tool unit and cooperating with said selectively operated means to close one of said circuits.

3. In a suction cleaner, suction-creating means including a multi-speed driving motor, a body including a nozzle and an open air passageway leading to said means from said nozzle, said body being adapted to receive and removably seat a cover to complete said passageway or a dusting tool converter, a plurality of contacts or switches being provided on said body in the circuits of said motor and being positioned so as to be selectively contacted by means on a cover or a converter to close said circuits.

4. In a suction cleaner, a suction-creating fan, a body including an air passageway, a driving motor connected to said fan, a plurality of electric circuits for multi-speed operation of said motor,

' means on said body to close said circuits, said body being adapted to receive a cover member to complete said passageway to said fan or, a dust- I ing tool connection, and a cover member to complete said air passageway seated on said body and including means to operate one of said means on said body to close a circuit through said motor.

5. In a suction cleaner, a suction-creating fan, a body including an air passageway, a driving motor connected to said fan, a plurality of electric circuits for multi-speed operation of said motor, means on said body to close said circuits, said body being adapted to receive a cover member to complete said passageway to said fan or a dusting tool connection, and a dusting tool connection seated on said body and connected to said fan and including means to operate one of said means on said body to close a circuit through said motor.

6. In a suction cleaner, a body including a nozzle and an air passageway, suction-creating means in said body including an electric motor, a handle pivoted to said body, incoming currentcarrying leads entering said handle and extending to said body, contacts on said body connected to said leads and motor, a dusting tool connector removably secured to said body and open to said suction-creating means, a flexible hose connected to said connector, current-carrying leads extending along said hose adapted to be connected to said leads and motor, a switch on said hose connected to said leads, said connector including means to operate said contacts to connect said incoming leads, said motor and said switch in the same circuit.

7. The construction defined by claim 6 characterized by the fact that said motor includes a high speed circuit connected to and closed by said contacts.

8. In a suction cleaner, a body, a source of current, a driving motor, a plurality of multi-speed circuits through said motor, a dusting-tool-converter-opening-cover-plate-actuated contact in one circuit through said motor, and a removable cover plate forming a part of said body and securing said contact in one position.

9. In a suction cleaner, a source of current, a driving motor, a hand-operated switch, a high and a low speed motor circuit through said switch, and a dusting-tool-opening-cover-plate-actuated contact in series with said switch to connect said switch to the source of current, a dusting tool switch, a high and a low speed motor circuit through said switch, and a dusting-tool-connector-actuated contact in series with said dusting tool switch to connect said switch to the source of current.

10. In a suction cleaner, a body, a current source, an electric circuit comprising a driving motor, a handle switch, and a dusting-tool-opening-cover-plate-actuated contact to connect said circuit to said source, and a second circuit comprising said motor, a dusting tool switch, a dusting tool vibrator, and a dusting-tool-converteractuated contact to connect said circuit to said source, said cleaner body being adapted to removably embody a coverplate or a dusting tool converter.

11. Ina suction cleaner, 9. body adapted for on-the-floor cleaning, suction-creating means in said body including a driving motor, a controlling switch connected in the electric circuit 0! said motor, said body being adapted to receive dusting tools for use in ofi-the-floor cleaning, a dusting tool unit adapted to be connected to said body and to said suction-creating means, a switch on said unit, current-carrying leads extending from said switch to the cleaner end of said unit, cooperating means on said body and on said unit to connect said switch in the circuit of said motor, the electrical connections being such that with said unit connected said motor can be controlled by said dusting tool switch independently of said first mentioned switch.

12. The construction defined by claim 11 characterized in.that said first mentioned switch is hand operated, and is entirely disconnected. from the motor circuit upon the attachment of said dusting tool unit.

13. A suction cleaner of the on-the-floor cleaning type including a body adapted to receive a dusting tool unit for off-the-floor cleaning, suction-creating means including a motor having a plurality of circuits providing diflerent operating speeds, a dusting tool unit adapted tobe connected to said'body and including an electric circuit with a switch, and cooperating connections on said body and on said unit to connect said unit circuit to said motor in a relationship providing greater motor speed than the maximum speed with said dusting tool unit disconnected.

14. A suction cleaner of the on-the-fioor cleaning type including a body, suction-creating means in said body including a driving motor, a manually operable switch for controlling said motor in on-the-floor cleaning, said motor including a circuit to provide a different operating speed not controllable by said switch, and a dusting tool unit adapted to be connected to said cleaner body for o'iI-the-fioor cleaning, and an electric circuit and switch on said unit, and means to connect said last mentioned switch in said uncontrolled circuit for the purpose of running said motor at a speed not possible in on-the-floor cleaning.

15. A suction cleaner of the on-the-floor cleaning type including a body, suction-creating means in said body including a driving motor, and a dusting tool unit for off-the-floor cleaning connected to said body, and a control switch on said unit electrically connected in the circuit of said motor.

16. A suction cleaner of the on-the-floor cleaning type including a body, suction-creating means in said body including a driving motor, a dusting tool unit for off-the-floor cleaning connected to said suction-creating means and including an elongated conduit, an agitator element at the end of said conduit, electrical means to drive said element also at the end of said conduit, current- 15 conducting means connecting said motor and electrical means, and a manually operable switch connected to said motor and to said electrical means to control said motor and said means.

17. In a suction cleaner, a source of current, a driving motor, a plurality of multi-speed circuits thru said motor, a dusting-tool-converter-opening-cover-plate-actuated contact in one circuit thru said motor, a dusting-tool-converter-actuatedcontact in a second circuit thru said motor, a dusting tool converter connected to said source of suction, a hose attached to said converter, and a switch carried by said hose connected in said second circuit.

18. The construction recited by claim 17 characterized in that said second circuit is the high speed circuit.

19. In a suction cleaner, a source of current, a driving motor, a plurality of multi-speed circuits thru said motor, a dusting-tool-converter-opening-cover-plate-actuated contact in one circuit thru said motor, a hand-operated switch in said circuit, and a dusting-tool-converter-actuated contact in a second circuit thru said motor.

20. In a suction cleaner, a source of current, a driving motor, suction-creating means driven by said motor, a dusting tool unit connected to said means, motor-driven agitating means on said dusting tool unit, a switch on said unit at the end thereof, a plurality of circuits connecting said driving motor, said agitating means, and said switch to said source or current and to each other,

said switch being a multi-position switch and functioning to connect and disconnect said motor, or said motor and said agitating means from said source.

21. In a suction cleaner, a body, a source 01' current, a driving motor, a plurality of multispeed circuits through said motor, a dusting-toolconverter-actuated contact in one circuit through said-motor, and a dusting tool converter secured to said body and positioning said contact in one position.

22. A suction cleaner of the on-the-floor cleaning type including a body, suction-creating means in said body including a driving motor, a dusting tool unit for oiI-the-floor cleaning connected to said suction-creating means and including an elongated conduit, an agitator element at the end of said conduit, electrical means to drive said element positioned at the end of said conduit, current-carrying leads connecting said motor and said element across full, line potential, and a manually operable switch on said conduit connected to said leads to control the flow of electric current through said motor and said electrical means.

23. The construction recited in claim 22 characterized in that said switch is a three position switch and is adapted selectively to cause current to flow through said motor, or said motor and electrical means, or to open the electrical circuits.

DONALD G. BMELIJE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2482337 *Aug 20, 1943Sep 20, 1949Eureka Williams CorpVacuum cleaner converter arrangement
US2487443 *Jun 11, 1943Nov 8, 1949Eureka Williams CorpConversion arrangement for vacuum cleaners
US2664587 *Mar 22, 1950Jan 5, 1954Hoover CoConversion arrangement for suction cleaners
US2671923 *Nov 29, 1949Mar 16, 1954Hoover CoSuction cleaner thread guard on converter port covers
US2769997 *Jul 9, 1953Nov 13, 1956Gen ElectricElectric cord arrangement for vacuum cleaners
US2958894 *Sep 29, 1958Nov 8, 1960Hoover CoSuction cleaners
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US3127227 *Feb 27, 1961Mar 31, 1964 Vacuum cleaner connector
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US6497001Jan 12, 2001Dec 24, 2002Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Hand-held vacuum cleaner with a detachable head
US6510584 *Jan 12, 2001Jan 28, 2003Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Flow cut-off and brushroll shut-off mechanism for vacuum cleaner
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/332, 439/194, 174/47, 15/377, 310/68.00A, 310/66, 15/314
International ClassificationA47L9/28, A47L5/32, A47L9/04, A47L9/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0411, A47L9/242, A47L5/32, A47L9/2847, A47L9/2857
European ClassificationA47L9/28D4, A47L9/28F, A47L9/24B, A47L5/32, A47L9/04B2