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Publication numberUS2073551 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1937
Filing dateNov 4, 1935
Priority dateNov 4, 1935
Publication numberUS 2073551 A, US 2073551A, US-A-2073551, US2073551 A, US2073551A
InventorsCrasnoff Victor N
Original AssigneeCrasnoff Victor N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Counting device
US 2073551 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 9, 1937. v. N. CRASNOFF 2,073,551

COUNTING DEVICE Filed NOV. 4, 1935 FlG.8.

Patented Mar. 9, 1937 UNITED STATES PATET OFFICE COUNTING DEVICE Victor N. Grasnofi, Alton, Ill.

Application November 4, 1935, Serial No. 48,109

3 Claims. (01. 273-148) This invention relates to counting devices, and with regard to certain more specific features, to counting devices assembled in a set for facilitating the playing and scoring of the game of bridge,

and similar games.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of a set of counting devices embodying a plurality of individual series of counters, said series being readily distinguished from each other, one of said series being adapted for the counting or scoring of points representing the winnings or losses of one player to another (such as above-the-line and below-the-line points in the game of bridge), while another of said series is adapted for the counting or scoring of another type of points not combinable with the first type (such as partial scores, games, and like below-the-line points in the game of bridge);

the provision of a set of devices of the class described which is particularly adapted for use in playing the game of bridge, and which, when used, eliminates the necessity of figured score sheets or tallies, and eliminates the necessity of much addition and totalizing work, such as, for

example, at the end of a rubber of bridge in a progressive bridge party. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawing, which collectively illustrates one embodiment of the invention,

Figures 1 and 2 are plan and elevational views, respectively, of one counter from one series of a set;

counters belonging to the same series as the Fig. 1 counters;

Figures 8 and 9 are plan and elevational views, respectively, of a counter from a second series of the set;

Figures 10, 11, and 12 are plan views of other counters belonging to the said second series;

Figures 13 and 14 are plan and elevational views, respectively, of a counter from a third series of the set; and,

Figures 15, 16, and 17 are plan views of other counters belonging to the said third series.

The present invention is particularly adapted for use in playing the game of bridge, in its 55 several forms, and it will accordingly be described Figures 3 through '7 are plan views of other with reference to the game of bridge. In the game of bridge, as is well-known, there are two types of points that it is necessary to keep concurrent track of, these being the points (ordinarily scored above-the-line on bridge tallies) representing net gains and losses with no further significance, and the points (ordinarily scored below-the-line on bridge tallies) representing game values, which, in addition to their point value, have value in connection with the establishing or making of a game or rubber.

When it is played in the ordinary manner, the game of bridge requires an objectionable amount of scoring effort, particularly in the addition of points of both species to establish winnings and losses of one player to another at the end of a rubber and tallying scores of different players over a series of rubbers. The present invention, utilized in the manner set forth hereinafter, immensely reduces the effort connected with such scoring, as it automatically adds and subtracts, and keeps segregated in the proper manner, the several species of points mentioned.

The present invention, briefly, comprises a set of counters or chips, each set comprising three series visually readily distinguishable from each other, and each series in turn comprising an assembly of units of varying denominational value. The particular structure and material from which the counters are made is of little or no consequence, celluloid, paper, fiber, aluminum, steel, copper, and other materials being equally suitable. The three series of counters comprising the set are visually readily distinguishable in some manner. For example, the set as shown 'in the drawing comprises a circular series of counters (Figures 1 through '7), a square series (Figures 8 through 12), and a hexagonal series (Figures 13 through 17). Shape is thus relied upon as the distinguishing feature. However, color may also be used as the distinguishing feature, for example, by making the first series red, the second blue, and the third yellow, the shapes of all series being the same. Or, material may be used asthe distinguishing feature, such as by making the first series of fiber, the second of aluminum, and the third of copper. Or, surface characteristics (such as varying degrees of roughness) may similarly be used. It is necessary only that the three series be readily distinguishable from one another.

Each series is in turn divided into unit counters of various denominations, it beng preferable to grade the size of the counter in accordance with its denominational value. For instance, in the first series of counters shown (Figures 1 through 7), a counter of denominational value 1000 (Fig. 1), a counter of value 500 (Fig.

3), a counter of value 100 (Fig. 4), a counter of 5 value 50 (Fig. 5), a counter of value 30 (Fig. 6), and a counter of value 20 (Fig. 7) are provided in decreasing diametrical size.

The second and third series of counters are similarly divided into counters of varying denominational value and correspondingly varying size; for example, a counter of value 40 (Figures 8 and 13), a counter of value 30 (Figures and 15), and a counter of value (Figures 11 and 16). In addition, both the second and third series have each a counter bearing no denominational value, but merely the word Game or other suitable non-value mark (Figures 12 and A complete set for playing one table of bridge 20 has been established as preferably containing the following assortment of counters.

First series Second series Third series 16 Counters, value 1,000 2 Counters, value 40 2 Counters, value 40 20 Counters, value 500 2 Counters, value 2 Counters, value 30 16 Counters, value 4 Counters, value 20 4 Counters, value 20 12 Counters, value 2 Game counters. 2 Game counters. 12 Counters, value 12 Coun;ers, value In using this set to play the game of bridge, the first series of counters (the circular series) is used for keeping track of the losses of one player to another, and for the duration of the play the circular series in one players possession may be considered as his property. The second (square) and third (hexagonal) series of counters, however, are used only for keeping track of game or below-the-line points, and have no value as a measurement of one players losses to another player.

At the outset of play, the counters are desirably divided among the four players (North,

South, East, and West) as follows:

South 4 Round counters, value 1, 000 5 Round counters, value 500 4 Round counters, value 100 3 Round counters, value" 3 Round counters, value 30 3 Round counters, value 20 22 Round counters, total value- 7, 200 50 1 Square Game counter 1 Square counter, value. 40 1 Square counter, value. 30 2 Square counters, value 20 East West 4 Round counters, value 1, 000 4 Round counters, value 5 Round counters, value 500 5 Round counters, value 4 Round counters, value 100 4 Round counters, value" 3 Round counters, value 50 3 Round counters, value 3 Round counters, value 30 3 Round counters, value-.. 3 Round counters, value 20 3 Round counters, value--.

22 Round counters, total value 7, 200

1 Hexagonal Game counter.

22 Round counters, total value. 7, 200

1 Square Game counter.

7 1 Square counter, value 40 1 Square counter, value 30 2 Square counters, value 20 Each player thus commences with identical allotments of first series (round) counters, and 75 equivalent values of second (square, North and South) and third (hexagonal, East and West) series counters.

All transactions between players not involving points which count on game, or below-theline points, are handled with round counters only. For example, North and South are set and have to pay a penalty of 300 points. North gives East 300 points in round counters, and South gives West 300 points in round counters.

Transactions involving game, or below-theline points, are handled with both round and square or hexagonal counters (as the case may be). The round counters record gains and losses in points, while the square and hexagonal counters record only game points scored. For example, North and South bid three hearts and make six hearts. North collects from East 180 points in round counters and 90 points in hexagonal counters, while South collects a like amount from West. On the following hand, East and West bid six clubs and make it, and the'transactions thereafter are as follows: North gives East 620 points in round counters (500 points for the little slam and 120 points for making six clubs) and also his square game counter, to record that East has made a game. Inasmuch as East has now made a game, the previous 90 game points made by North are nullified as to their game-scoring ability, and hence North also returns to East the 90 points in hexagonal counters previously paid by East to North. The transaction between South and West is identical.

As the game progresses and the players move from one table to another or pivot, they carry with them their round counters only, leaving the square and hexagonal counters on the table.

At the end of the game, the difference between any players total points in round counters and 7,200 represents his total winnings or losses.

of the rubbers, are necessary in keeping score.

22 Round counters, total value. 7, 200

1 Hexagonal Game counter.

A particular advantage of the invention as described is that its use positively eliminates the dangers of cheating or unintentional errors in scoring. Further, any players total stock of first series counters represents at that moment his standing as to winnings or losses without laborious additions and subtractions.

A further convenience attending the use of the present invention is that any player may, at any time, know the partial score of the game merely by looking at his own partial score counters.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As many changes could be made in carrying out the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A set of counters for playing the game of bridge comprising three series of counters visually readily distinguishable one from the other, the

first series being adapted for keeping track of points representing the winnings or losses of one player to another, and the second and third series being adapted for keeping track of points representing partial scores, for example, each of said series comprising a plurality of unit counters of various denominational values.

2. A set of counters for playing the game of bridge comprising three series of counters visually readily distinguishable one from the other, the first series being adapted for keeping track of points representing the winnings or losses of one player to another, and the second and third series being adapted for keeping track of points representing partial scores, for example, each of said series comprising a plurality of unit counters of various sizes and denominational values, said second and third series in addition having no-value counters including a Game designation.

3. A set of counters as set forth in claim 2, in which the said counters are provided as follows: First series, 16 counters of 1000-point value, 20 counters of 500-p0int value, 16 counters of 100- point value, 12 counters of 50-point value, 12 counters of -point value, and 12 counters of 20- point value; second series, 2 counters of -point value, 2 counters of 30-point value, 4 counters of 20-point value, and 2 Game counters; and the third series has the same content as the second series.

VICTOR N. CRASNOFF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585458 *Oct 11, 1949Feb 12, 1952Gordon Julia E IGame apparatus for teaching the use of the multiplication table
US2798722 *Apr 28, 1954Jul 9, 1957Paul Fluhrer MarvinTossing discs
US3764146 *Feb 1, 1971Oct 9, 1973C VogelGame playing pieces
US4138115 *Dec 20, 1976Feb 6, 1979Ernest GansMagnetic square and jig saw puzzle
US4669734 *Feb 8, 1985Jun 2, 1987Watkins Kirk WBoard game utilizing jigsaw puzzle
US4792138 *Dec 11, 1986Dec 20, 1988Watkins Kirk WJigsaw puzzle game
US20120258813 *Mar 10, 2012Oct 11, 2012Belcher Timothy WBilliards Queue Placement Token
WO1986004513A1 *Feb 3, 1986Aug 14, 1986Paraphase IncBoard game utilizing jigsaw puzzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/148.00R, 273/294
International ClassificationA63F1/00, A63F1/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/18
European ClassificationA63F1/18