Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2073867 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1937
Filing dateOct 18, 1935
Priority dateOct 18, 1935
Publication numberUS 2073867 A, US 2073867A, US-A-2073867, US2073867 A, US2073867A
InventorsHarriet A Feigenbaum
Original AssigneeHarriet A Feigenbaum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of repairing and lengthening fingernails
US 2073867 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 15 1937. Y I A. FEIGENBAUM R 2,073,867

METHODQF REPAIRING AND LENGTHENING FINGERNAILS Filed 0 01;. 18, 1955 Fig.1

Harriet A. Feig 'enbaum By Ms? Arne/Mrs rattlin is, rear ew OFFICE b H V 2.073351 r Mormon? orinsrsmmo AND tano'riinn f m n rmcsnnms ll larriet A Feigenb aum, Minneapolisrllr i i nn. Application was 1a,; 1935, Serial to. 45,560 GClaiins. (01. 132 m My present invention relates to an improved method of lengthening finger nails for. use generally in the repairing offinger nails.

nails that have been broken ofl? or otherwise damaged at theprojecting' end portions, may be restored to normal appearance while the damaged nailis growing out; l

A further object of the inventionis the provisionyof a method whereby finger nails may be artificiallylengthened without causing discomi 1;, The above and numerous other important ob-I jects andadvantages of .the invention will be 'made apparent from" the following specification, claimsanddrawingI l l In the accompanying drawingplikecharacters 20 indicate like parts throughout the several views.;,,

R ri to the drawingrv it b r Fig: l isa perspective viewof a human hand showing by ,full lines one finger nail with a broken off tip, the brokenoff tip being shown by dotted 25111165; 3 .w

Fig. 2 isa plan viewof a shield-like former for.

use in carrying out the methodi'i Fig.3 is an'enlarged top viewrof thefinger of Fig. 1, thenail'of which'is broken;

0 Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but illustrating thefshieldlike "former of Fig. 2. applied between the projecting end of the broken off finger nail andthe fingerfl b r Fig, 5 is an'enlarged sectional view taken on thellinc 5--5 of Fig. 4;, and showing a further step in the method; and a Fig. Gis a view similar to 'Fig. 5 but illustrating the shield-like former removed and the artificial tip trimmed to shape.

In the drawing the finger with the broken nail l is indicated by l, the broken nail by 8, the broken off nail tip by 9, andthe shield-like former by H]. Anexample of a preferred method of repairing or restoring to nomai appearance a finger-- nail, the tip portion of which has been broken ,off or otherwise damaged or rendered unsightly, will firstbe'given. Assuming that the finger nail to be repaired has been broken ofi, as indicated by full lines in th-edrawing, the first .step'in the" method of restoring the tip consists in applying under the projecting portion of the broken off fingernail a shield-like former In like that shown in Figs. 2, 4, and5. Fig. 4 illustrates this first ,1 step in the method. a i 5 The former is of thin material that is easily portion of the finger nail and underlying portion of the finger, as shown in Figs l and 5, the upl per surface of thejshield-like former projects in artificially provided with new tips and thereby .cut to shape and made, to properly fit snugly againstthe finger at thepoint of jointure thereb of with the finger nail. When the former is ap- [in important object of the inventi'onq is th Q provision of an improved method wherebyfingen plied andproperly fittedbetween the projecting l is self -supporting.

The next step in the method consists in applyingover the surfaceof thefinger nail and shield a relatively heavy coat of relatively fast solidi- I fyinglacquer-like liquid substance, see FigIfi,

that will, when setsorsolidified, have (an appear- ,ance and physical eharacteristics simulating those of a fingernail. The lacquer like liquid substance maybe applied in any desired manner r such, -for example-asby means of afbrush, and

, is preferablyfiowed on in, a quite thick coat or coats so that the ridge formed by the edge of the fingernail at the point where it overlaps theshield-like former will become leveled out substantially as shown in Fig. 5. The number of coats required will depend largelyupon the conslstency ofthe fiuid substance and; of course,

for the purpose of giving an even surface tothe. recappedand tipped finger nail an extracoator qcoats may beapplied over the shield only. In I Figs. 5 andfiof the drawing the solidified coating that forms acap' over the nail isindicated by H and thenew tip-which is an integralj part of the cap "is indicated by l2. y

When the lacquer-like substance has solidified, the shield-like former l0, whichis preferably so smooth and non-absorbent that the .substance will not tightly adhere thereto, may be removed I and the artificial finger nail tip may be trimmed by filing or/and cutting to the j desired shape 40 and length, see Fig. 6. Of course, if desired, the former H1 may be left in place and trimmed with the nail but obviously, the most natural appearance will be obtained by removing the shield.

A suitable lacquer-like product for use in carrying out the above method and one suitable also 'for use generally in the repairing of finger nails, may be obtained by dissolving celluloid in acetone and adding to this lacquer-like liquid base a powdered non-soluble substance, such as chalk. Pure celluloid in solidified form is more transparent than a finger nail and is too soft and flexible for filing, but the suspended nonsoluble substance, such as chalk, gives thejsubstance a translucent appearance muchlike that of a natural finger nail and renders the solidified lacquer-like substance hard and adaptable to be filed to shape in the manner of a finger nail. Preferably, I saturate the lacquer-like substance with chalk and add a suitable stabilizer, preferably sodium chloride, to the preparation to prevent the chalk or other non-soluble powdered substance from precipitating out of the solution. The sodium chloride is believed to impart an electrical charge to the chalk particles which is responsible for keepinga relatively large amount of chalk in suspension.

Whereas celluloid dissolved in acetone has been found very satisfactory as a base for the preparation and has been given as a preferred example, it should be understood that various other lacquer-like or lacquer substances may be successfully substituted therefor. Among these suitable substitutes are shellac dissolved in alcohol, various other fast drying lacquers, various fast drying nitrocellulose solutions, and some forms of commercial nail enamels. Whenchalk and sodium chloride are added to these lacquers or lacquer-like bases and allowed to solidify, a product closely simulating that of a finger nail in appearance and physical characteristics will be produced.

A most highly satisfactory preparation is usually obtained when the powdered non-soluble substance, preferably chalk, and the suitable stabilizer, preferably sodium chloride, are each added to'the lacquer-like fluid to the point of saturation. I V

A suitable shield-like former may be made from suitable paper or from thin and soft sheet metal or metal foil.

What I claim is:' Y 1. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying a former under the projecting end of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the end'of the finger nail and its upper surface is in the plane of the under surface of the finger nail, and then applying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-like substance which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics simulating those of a finger nail.

2. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying 'a former under the projecting end .of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the end of the finger nail and its upper surface. is in thefplane of the under surface of the fingernail, then applying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-likesubstance which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics simulating those of a finger nail, and thereafter trimming the projecting end portion of the solidified lacquer-like substance to obtain a desired shape.

3. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying a former under the projecting end of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the end of the finger nail and its upper surface is in the plane of the under surface of the finger nail, then aplying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-like substance which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics simulating those of a finger nail, and thereafter removing the former.

4. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying a former under the projecting end of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the'end of the finger nail and its upper surface is in the plane of the under surface of the finger nail, then applying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-like substance, which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics .simulating those of a finger nail, thereafter removing the former, and finally trimming the extended end portion of the solidified lacquerlike substance to a desired shape and length by filing and/or cutting.

5. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying a former under the projecting end of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the end of the finger nail and its upper surface is in the plane of the under surface of the finger nail, then applying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-like substance which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics simulating those of a finger nail, and thereafter trimming theextended portions of the super-imposed solidified lacquer-like substance and former to desired shape and length.

6. The method of lengthening finger nails which comprises applying a former under the projecting end of the finger nail so that it projects beyond the end of the finger nail and its upper surface is in the plane of the under surface of the finger nail, then applying over the finger nail and former a lacquer-like substance which, when it sets, will adhere to the finger nail and have appearance and physical characteristics simulating those of a finger nail, and permitting filing of the projected end to shape.

HARRIET A. FEIGENBAUM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2799282 *May 18, 1955Jul 16, 1957Slack Thomas SDevice for extending fingernails
US2816555 *Jan 7, 1955Dec 17, 1957Klump Charles ADecorative shield for finger nail
US3228404 *Oct 18, 1963Jan 11, 1966Turner Hannah GMethod of protecting, repairing and lengthening fingernails
US3478756 *Jul 14, 1964Nov 18, 1969Inter Taylor AgForming artificial nails
US3552401 *Aug 14, 1968Jan 5, 1971Criswell Angie FSynthetic nail structure
US3875950 *Sep 24, 1973Apr 8, 1975Henry Joseph GensMethod of covering fingernails
US3972325 *Aug 11, 1975Aug 3, 1976Gene W. ArantFingernail protector and method
US4007748 *Feb 13, 1976Feb 15, 1977Eve-N-Tips IndustriesFingernail extension
US4126144 *Dec 30, 1976Nov 21, 1978Duarte Patricia APolyvinyl acetate or ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer
US4135526 *Sep 9, 1977Jan 23, 1979International Beauty DistributorApplication of fingernal extension to natural fingernail
US4229431 *Feb 5, 1979Oct 21, 1980Lee PharmaceuticalsIn situ polymerization
US4267852 *Sep 17, 1979May 19, 1981Hullinger Judith EProcess for enhancing and strengthening the growth of nails
US4407310 *Jun 6, 1980Oct 4, 1983Kristy Wells, Inc.Sculptured artificial nail
US4495172 *Feb 4, 1980Jan 22, 1985Scientific Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Composed of ethoxyethyl methacrylate, filler, and crosslinking agent
US4718957 *Jul 24, 1986Jan 12, 1988Sensenbrenner Kenneth CBisphenol a-glycidyl methacrylate polymer, gold, silver or porcelain
US4767648 *Jun 25, 1987Aug 30, 1988Spencer R&D Inc.Appling white flexible tab to fingernail tip; trimming; translucent nail polish overcoating
US5806537 *Aug 15, 1997Sep 15, 1998Wittwer; JulietArtificial support nail and method for applying artificial support nail
WO2008110982A1 *Mar 10, 2008Sep 18, 2008Amazing BrandsMethod for artificially extending nails
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/73, 428/15
International ClassificationA61K8/02, A45D31/00, A61Q3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/02, A61Q3/00, A45D31/00
European ClassificationA45D31/00, A61Q3/00, A61K8/02