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Publication numberUS2074622 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1937
Filing dateJun 3, 1933
Priority dateJun 3, 1933
Publication numberUS 2074622 A, US 2074622A, US-A-2074622, US2074622 A, US2074622A
InventorsAllston Sargent, Armstrong Addison C
Original AssigneeCampbell Metal Window Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilating and air treating provision
US 2074622 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, A. SARGENT E AL VENTILATING AND AIR TREATING PROVISION.

Filed June 3, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 W ATTORNEY March 23, A S ENT ET AL 2,074,622

VENTILATING AND AIR TREATING PROVISION Filed June 3, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY 5 Sheet5-Sheet 3 muuulju UDEIEIUD DEIUEIEICI Inn F1 A. SARGENT ET AL VENTILATING AND AIR TREATING PROVISION Filed June 5, 1933 iii-32:11::-

March 23, 1937.

March 23, 1937. A, SARGENT ET AL 2,074,622

VENTILATING AND AIR TREATING PROVISION Filed June 3, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 an) BY A? W ATTORNE March 23, A. SARGENT ET AL VENTILATING A ND AIR TREATING PROVISION 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 3, 1933 m v G ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 23, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE VENTILATING AND AIR TREATING PROVISION Application June 3, 1933, Serial No. 674,188

23 Claims.

Our present invention comprises novel ventilating and air treating provisions primarily devised for use in room ventilation and air treatment, and by the term air treating, as used more of a variety of actions or effects such as circulating, heating, cooling and humidifying air, for the general purpose of maintaining desirable atmospheric conditions in dwelling, oflice, and other rooms which contribute to the health or comfort of the occupants of such rooms.

The present invention includes building wall construction and arrangement features devised to provide a suitable and suitably located space to receive ventilating and air treating provisions. and construction and arrangement features of housing-parts associated with the wall structure to provide a suitable enclosure for said space.

The present'invention also comprises improvements in ventilating and air treating provisions proper, which contribute to their structural and' mal wall thickness is substantial, so that by the provision ofa recess space in front beneath a window opening, sufficient space to accommo- "date suitably compact ventilating and air treating provisions may be provided within an enclosure the room side of which projects inwardly'but little, if any, from the inner face of the body portion of said outer wall.

The invention in its preferred form is also characterized by special means employed in conjunction with the said outer wall to provide an enclosure for the recess space which normally is anchored or secured rigidly in place, and ex-" tcrnally is attractive in 'formand ofconvenient shape, and which may be opened up" readily when conditions require to'permit access to the ventilating and air treating provisions therein.

Certain, features of the invention are of especial utility in connection with a building wall herein, we mean to generically include one or including metallic windows, and the present in ciated with the wall proper to provide an en- 53 acterize my invention are'pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, however, its advantages and specific object's obtained with it, -ref- 5 erence should be had to the accompanying drawingsand descriptive matter in which we have illustrated and described preferred embodiments Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5'is a perspective view illustrating adetail of construction of the structure shown in Figs. 1-4;

Fig, 6 is a front or room side elevation of the structure shown in Fig. 2 with parts broken away and in section;

Fig. 7 is a view taken similarly to Fig. 2 illustrating the use of air moving and noise eliminating apparatus incorporated in a recess space shown as empty in Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a, section on the line 8-8 of Fig.- 7;

Fig. 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Fig. "I;

Fig. 9a is a section taken similarly to, and illustrating a modification of control means shown in Fig. 9;

Fig. 10 is a section on the line Ill-I0 of Fig.

11 illustrating the use of a modified form of ven- 35 tilating and air treating means; and I Fig. 11 is a section on the line ll-l I of Fig. 10.

In the drawings, and referring first to the ar-- rangement shown in Figs. 1-6, I represents the floor of a room having a window opening 3 111 the outer wall 2 of the room. Mounted in the window opening 3 isv a window casing comprisihg side members 4, a window sill member 5 and sash members 6 of a known type of metallic'window frame construction. In respect to its genclosed space beneath the window opening for tion 2' beneath the window opening and adjacent the outer side of the wall which is of less horizontal thickness than the main portion of the wall 2. The inner or room side face of this thin masonry wall portion '2' thus forms the outer wall of a recess space which, as is shown in Fig.

4, is of the-full width of the window opening, and which extends downward to the floor level. A space 2" is also provided between the top of the wall portion 2 and the metallic window casing parts. The space 2" in the particular construction illustrated in Figs. 2-6 does not extend the full width of the window opening, but is in the form of a rectangular recess or notch in the upper edge of the wall portion 2', with each end wall of the notch spaced away from the .corresponding side of the window opening. The said recess space in front of the wall 2' and the notch I space 2 collectively form a. recess which is partly beneath and partly in front of the window, and all or a portion only of which, depending on conditions of use, may be utilized for ventilation and air treatment purposes, as hereinafter described.

For the purposes of the present invention a chambered metallic subsill I is mounted in the wall 2 immediately beneath the window sill 5, and extends between the latter and the upper edge portions of the thin masonry wall 2 at the 5 ends of the recess 2" over which the central portion of the sub-sill extends. Moiinted in the notch or recess 2" is the outer portion of a metallic box or casing structure enclosing a chamber 8.0f rectangularform which is adapted to receive ventilating and air treating provisions. No such provisions in the chamber 8 are shown in Figs. 1-6 which represents a building constructed with the chamber 8 therein to receive ventilating and air treating provisions, but adaptedto initial use without such provisions. In the hereinafter described Figs. 7-11 however, arrangements including the use of such provisions in the chamber 8 are illustrated.

The subsill I, while not used for the purpose in 0 the arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6, was devised spandrel or plate-like body I2 of aluminum, or

other suitable metal, which, in the-arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6, forms the outer facing of the portion of the wall 2 extending between each subsill I and the top of the immediately subjacent window opening (see Fig. '1). In the condition of the apparatus shown in Figs. 1-6, the outlet I I is closed by a plate I3 detachably secured in place, and removable through the chainber 8.

In the preferred construction illustrated; the D Y subsill 1 comprises end castings I4, members I5 and I6, forming the top and bottom walls of the projecting outer portion of the subsill, and spaced apart by the end castings intermediate brace or I strut members comprising a casting I1 and a plate member I8, and certain metal plates, all

suitably connected as by bolt or screw connectors I9. The parts I5 and I6 might be castings,

.but advantageously are sections of extruded metal. The part I5 has a downturned portion I5 at its outer edge which forms the outer wall of the elongated inlet III and extends downward below the upper edge of the corresponding spandrel I2 and serves to prevent rain or snow from driving into the inlet Ill. The part it has a downturned flange I6 at its outer edge which forms the inner wall of the inlet I0 and overlaps the upper edge of the spandrel I2, and preferably is spaced away from the latter to provide a space receiving calking material I2.

As shown, the portion of the subsill top wall at the inner side of the part I5, is formed by a metal plate 20 which also includes a downturned vertical portion forming the front or room fac- -ing wall of the chamber 9 and terminating at its lower edge in an outwardly extending flange 20'. The previously mentioned plate I8 employed as a temporary closure for the subsill outlet I I has its inner edge extending under and secured plate I3 extends under and is connected to the front or inner edge of the part I8. At the ends of the plate I3, the subsill I is provided with short bottom wall plates 2} carryingbatten members 22 which overlapthe ends of the plate I3. A stiffening angle plate 23 is shown as having a horizontal flange engaging the upper side oi the flange 20", and a vertical flange extending tension of the inner vertical wall of the metallic against the flange 20'. The outer edge of the window sill 5. To insure against air leakage through the joints of the subsill structure the joints are advantageously sealed by a suitable joint material such as mastick. Calking material 5' is employed to close the joint between the outer edge of the windowsill 5 and the subsill member I5.

In the construction illustrated the casing struc ture enclosing the chamber 8 comprises a bottom plate member 26 and vertical outer and end wall plate members 2'I and 28, respectively, welded or otherwise suitably secured to the member- 26. Angle members 29 secured to the external sidesof the end plate members 28 at the upper edges of the latter are' provided to facilitatethe attachment of the 'casing structure to the hollow sill as by suitable bolt or screwconnectors 29'. The major 'portion of the top wall of the I chamber 8 is formed by the subsill I, but a portion of the chamber 8 projects inwardly or to the front of the subsill. This projecting front pottion of the chamber 8 is closed atits top in .the condition of the apparatus shown in Figs.

as I

1-6 by a removable coverplate 30; The latter I has an upwardly extending flange 30' at its outer.

front wall of the chamber 8 is formed in the arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6 by a removable plate member 3| bolt or screw flanges 30", 28 and 26'.

In the arrangement shown-in Figs. 1-6, the

space provided for the reception of ventilating connected to the and. air treating means includes not only the chamber 8, but a chamber 'or space 32 in front of the chamber 8. The space 32 extends for the full width of the window opening from the floor level approximately to the level of the upper side of the window sill 5. In the arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6, the air treating apparatus in the chamber 32 is a steam heating radiator .33, but in some cases other apparatus may advantageously be installed in the space 32, one such use of other apparatus being illustrated in Figs. .9, 10 and 11.

The front or room side, and the top wall portions of the housing or enclosure for the space 32 comprises a front and top cover plate memis slightly below the upper side of the window sill member 5. The horizontal portion 34' 0f the plate 34 terminates in a downturned flange which abuts against and is detachably secured, as hereinafter described, to the vertical front portion of the sill 5.

The corner post members 35, advantageously,

are permanently secured in place in the building wall structure prior to the application of the plaster wall finish, and may be regarded as forming fixed parts of the wall 2. Each corner post member comprises a vertical portion of the 35 angle bar cross-section and with one flange parallel and the other transverse to the general direction of the wall. Each part 35 may project into the room beyond the inner face of the body portion of the wall 2, as shown, for a distance nearly equal to the width of the corner post flange which is transverse to the face of the wall 2. The vertical flange of each corner post which is parallel to the wall 2 extends towards the opposite corner post and abuts against the adjacent edge of the plate 34. The outer side of the latter bears against batten members 31 secured to the corresponding flanges of the corner post members at the sides of the latter facing the space 32. Each corner post 35 has its upper end connected by a horizontal member 35' to the corresponding end of the window sill 5. As shown each member 35 is an integral extension of that flange of the corresponding corner post which abuts against the adjacent end of the cover plate 34, the corresponding portion of the other flange of the corner post being cut away.

Each batten 31 as shown in Fig. 5, includes an upper horizontal portion underlying the horizontal corner post portion 35 and abutting at its 6:) outer end against the adjacent portion of a gusset plate or reenforcing member 38 which terminates at its outer edge in a downtumed flange 38' bearing against a spacer or filler strip 39 interposed between the flange and the front vertical wall of the sill member 5 to which said flange is secured. Each comer post 35 may be connected to the corresponding batten member 31 and gusset plate 38 in any suitable manner as by spot welding. The previously mentioned downturned flange 34" at the upper corner of the cover plate member may advantageously be received, as shown, in a groove or channel 5a. The outer wall of the latter is formed by the vertical portion 5" of sill -member 5. At the ends of the pocket 50, the frontand bottom walls thereof sill and floor.

\ desirable to obtain access to the space 32.

are formed by the gusset plate vertical flanges 38' .and filler strips 39. The front and bottom walls of the intermediate portion or portions of the pocket 5a are formed by offset parts of a bar 40 secured to the vertical portion 5" of the sin 5 and extending continuously or in spaced apart sections between theend portions of the pocket.

,The previously mentioned floor member 36 is of angle bar cross-section having one flange resting on the floor l and extending into the space 32 and having its other flange vertical and in register with the vertical portions of the batten member 31 and overlapping the parallel flanges of the corner post members. Inturned end extensions 36' of the last mentioned flange of the floor member 36 abut against the corresponding flanges of the corner posts 35 which are connected to the parts 36' by bolt or screw connectors 4|. The level of the upper ends of the corner posts is in definite relation to the window sill member 5 and the member 36 is formed with vertically elongated slots which receive the connectors 4|, and thereby provide for such vertical adjustment of the floor member relative to the corner post as may be necessary to accommodate variations in the vertical distance between floor and window sill level which may be expected in ordinary building construction.

The lower edge of the cover plate member 34 overlaps the vertical flange of the floor member 36 and is held in snug contact therewith by spring fingers 42 secured to the member 34 and overlapping the vertical flange of the floor member. This arrangement permits of such vertical adjustment of the member 34 relative to the floor member 36 as may be necessary to accommodate variations in the distance between the window The described connection between the plate 34 and the floor member also permits the removal of the member 34 by a simple vertical movement whenever it becomes necessary or The vertical movement of the member 34 which separates the latter from the floor. plate also moves its flange 34" out of the pocket 5a.

The horizontal portion 34 of the cover plate 34 forms a stool or window seat-like extension of the window sill, and is advantageously stiffened as by means of an angle bar 43 spot welded or otherwise secured to the under side of the portion 34 intermediate the inner and outer edges of the latter. The cover plate member 34 is formed with openings as required or made desirable by the character and disposition of the apparatus within the enclosure of whichfthe member 34 forms a principal element. In the arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6, the openings through the member 34 include a set of lower air inlet openings 44 through which room air may enter the space 32 beneath the radiator 33, a set of outlet openings 45 in the vertical portion of the member 34 adjacent the upper end of the latter, and a set of ports 46 in the' horizontal portion 34 above the radiator 33, the air heated by the radiator normally escaping in part through the ports 45 and partly through the ports 46. The

portion 34 is also formed with a series of outlet ports 41 above the inner partition of the chamber 8: The last mentioned ports are practically functionless in the use of-the apparatus illustrated in Figs. 1-6, but serve as outlet ports for air passing into the room from the chamber 8 when the latter is used as an air treating chamber. The ports 41 are confined to the portion of the cover plate directly above the outer portion of the chamber 8, but the ports M, t5 and 46 are arranged in rows which extend nearly the full width of the I member 34. In addition to the ports 44, 45, t6 5 and 41, the member 34 may be formed with openings for the stem of a radiator valve and any other control part desirably extending through the member 34. As shown also, openings 49 in the vertical portion of the member 34, which in 10 the use of the apparatus illustrated in Figs. 1-6

are closed by removable cover plates 50, are provided for the use of air filters which may be employed in some cases as hereinafter described.

The steam radiator 33 employed in the arrangement shown in Figs. l-6 is advantageously of a type having a relatively high heating capacity. One commercial form of radiator well adapted for such use is the so-called Murray radiator which is manufactured by the American Radiator Company and which comprises horizontal copper tubes 5| extending between chambered end members 52 and 53 and traversing thin metal fin plates. The latter are spaced along the tubes and welded thereto and are shaped and connected to provide a multiplicity of vertical fiues 5% or air passages offering little resistance to the flow of air therethrough. The radiator 33 is mounted on radiator supports 55 adjustably secured to bracket members 56. The latter are in the form of angle bars having upper horizontal flanges abutting against and secured as by spot welding to the bottom wall plate 26 of the chamber 8. The radiator supporting portions of the bracket 56 project in front of the chamber 8 through notches formed in the flange 23' and the lower edge of the plate 3|. The radiator steam supply and return pipes 51 and 58, respectively, pass horizontally through the lower portion of the recess space in front of the masonry wall portion 2'. The radiator 33 receives steam from the pipe 57 through a branch supply pipe 59 advantageously in the form of a gooseneck and including a control valve 60 having its horizontal stem 60 projecting through the vertical portion of the member 5 34 near the top of the latter. A branch return pipe 6| leads from the radiator outlet to the return main 58.

When the radiator 33 is supplied with steam the fiues 5t exert a stack action creating an up- 5 flow through them of air drawn into the enclosure about the radiator through the lower ports 44 in the cover member 34. The air thus.

heated is returned to the room through the ports 45 and 46 in the upper portion of the member 34. The air moving stack action of the fiues 54 is augmented by the stack action of the space between the plate 3| and the vertical portion of the 'cover plate 34. Advantageously, the radiator 33 is of a width but little less than the distance between the plates 3| and 34 so that all of the air entering the space between those plates passes in close proximity to the heating surface of the radiator. This in conjunction with the desirably high heat dissipating capacity of the radiator insures an air temperature above the radiator which is substantially in excess of the room temperature and results in a correspondingly vigorous convection current circulation upward from the inlet ports M to the outlet ports 85 and 46. What may be referred to'as the observable portion of the enclosure for the ventilating and air treating space of Figs. 1-6 is formed almost wholly by the bent cover plate member 3t and the corner posts 35. The vertical portion of this observable portion of the enclosure projects into the room but a slight distance, and both from the standpoint of appearance and of available room space, differs little from the smooth extension of the inner face of. the outer wall 2 which would exist if the latter were not recessed below the window in accordance with the present invention. The top portion of the enclosure formed by the portion 34 of the member 34 and the corresponding portions of the corner post members is similar in appearance to and is adapted to serve the usual purposes of a windown stool or seat. The described arrangement augments the circulation eifect long recognized as obtainable with a steam heating radiator 10- cated beneath and directly in front of a window. The metal parts of the enclosure are relatively simple in construction and are relatively inexpensive to construct with suitable strength and rigidity, and the removal of the readily removable cover plate member 36 provides full access to the apparatus within the enclosure. The construction shown in Figs. 1-6 is thus a desirable one even though no use is made of the chamber 8. The existence and effective capacity of that space and the effective use which may be made of it adds materially to the merit of the construction shown in Figs. l-6.

The chamber 8 was primarily devised for the purpose of, and may be used with especial advantage as a space in which to incorporate apparatus for moving external air into the room, for filtering such air' and for preventing the transmission of external noises into the room through the passages traversed by such air. One arrangement for thus supplying and filtering air and avoiding noise is illustrated in Figs. '7, 8 and 9.

The ventilating and air treating provisions incorporated in the chamber 8, as shown in Figs. '7, 8 and 9, include a motor I0 driving two fans or blowers H which are associated with a fan casing 72 having an upwardly directed discharge conduit 13 passing upward out of the chamber 8 in front of the subsill 1 to the under side of the enclosure outlets 47, a damper 14 in the outlet 13, and air filtering means 15 interposed in the path of the air passing from the subsill outlet II to the inlets of the fans H. In the preferred con struction illustrated all of the parts just mentioned form parts of a mechanical unit including a box-like casing or housing 16 which is bodily insertable in the chamber 8, after the removal of the plates I3, 30 and 3|. The top wall of the casing 18 is formed with an inlet opening Tl which is adapted to register with the subsill outlet H. The top wall of the casing 16 is also cut away for the passage of the fan outlet conduit 13. The casing 16 includes or has associated with it suitable provisions'for making an air-tight joint between its top wall and the subsill at the margins of the registering openings and 11. Those provisions and provisions desirably employed for anchoring the casing 16 in place in the chamber 8 need not be illustrated or described in detail as various forms of provisions suitable for the purpose may be provided without invention by a mechanic putting the casing 18 in place.

Since the plate 3| serves as a radiator baille plate directing the air flow over the radiator 33, and in the particular construction illustrated in Figs. 1-9extends horizontally at each side of the chamber 8 as does the radiator 33, the plate 3| is preferably put back in place, as shown in Figs. '7 and 8, after the insertion of the casing 16 in the chamber 8. As the discharge end of the fan discharge conduit 13 is preferably expanded,

as shown, so that its room side portion projects away from the sill and subsill beyond the room side of the .bhamber 8, the plate 3| is advantageously formed with kerfs 3Ia of such depth and so spaced apart that a.central upper tongue portion MD of the plate 3| may be bent inwardly toward the room, as shown in Figs. '7 and 8, to accommodate the tapered inner side wall of the expanded end of the conduit 13.

In the preferred construction illustrated the air filter provisions include two spaced apart filters I5 of rectangular shape located on opposite sides of the conduit I3 and removable and replaceable through the previously mentioned openings 49 in the cover plate member 34. As shown each filter I5 is of the well known type comprising a frame including wired screen-like upper and lower supports with suitable filter cloth or fibrous filter material between the supports. Each filter frame is slidingly received in guideways lI formed in a partition'member' I8 extending horizontally across the casing I8 above the top of the body portion of the fan casing I2 and dividing the interior of the casing I6 into an upper inlet chamber 8a and a lower fan chamber 82). The air entering the chamber 8a through the subsill outlet port II and port 11 of the housing I6 can escape from the chamber 8a only through the two openings in the partition I8 across which the two filters I5 extend. The air thus entering the fan chamber 8b can leave the latter only through the fan casing which has an inlet opening coaxial with the fans II at each end of each fan. I

To facilitate the removal and replacement of the casings and the avoidance of air leakage, tubular or open ended box-like parts I9 rectangular in transverse cross-section are secured to the inner or front wall of the casing I6 at the margin of openings in that wall through which the filters I5 are movable and in which operating extensions of the filter frames are normally disposed. Those extensions terminate at their outer ends in cover plate parts 15' replacing the previously mentioned cover plates 58 for the openings 49 in the front cover plate member 34. With the apparatus assembled as shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, the tubular parts I9 have their outer ends received in the openings 48 and extend through registering openings 3 la in the plate 30, the last mentioned openings being closed by removable cover plates 3 Id in the condition of the apparatus illustrated in Figs. 1-7.

Preferably the discharge conduit I3 is provided with suitably disposed sound absorbing material 80 to prevent the transmission of external noise into the room through the air passages provided for the supply of external air to the room by the fans II. The sound eliminating provisions need not be illustrated and described, however, as they may be of any'suitable known form. The shaft 14 carrying the damper I4 is advantageously provided with operating means including an operating part I4" projecting through the enclosure for the ventilating and air treating space. As shown the part I4" projects through the portion 34 of the cover plate mem-' ber 34 at one end of the. outlet openings 41. A controller 8| for the fan motor may be mounted in any convenient location, but preferably is carried on a bracket 82 secured to the upper front portion of the top wall of the casing I6 which,,

in effect, replaces the removable plate 30 used in the arrangement shown in Figs. 1-6. When so located the operating shaft 83 of the controller 8! is preferably extended upward through the horizontal portion 34 of the front cover plate.

, Advantageously in some cases the controls for different mechanisms located in the casing or housing I6 include interconnecting means which may be located in the'portion of the enclosed space external to said casing so that a single operating element projecting through the cover plate 34 may serve to adjust said controlling mechanisms. Fig. 9a shows one such arrangement differing from that shown in Fig. 9 in that in Fig. 9a, the operating shaft 83 of the controller 8| carries an arm 83a cooperating with an arm 14a secured to the damper shaft I4 which may replace the operating part I4 of Fig. 9. With the particular arrangement shown in Fig. 9a the controller arm 83a engages the damper shaft arm 14a and turns the damper I4 into its closed position when the controller shaft 83 is adjusted into the position in which it opens circuits the fan motor 10. When the shaft 83 is adjusted to put the motor 10 into operation the arm 83a is moved to a position in which it permits the damper I4 to open by gravity.

As previously pointed out,- the space within the main enclosure including the recess wall space may receive ventilating and air treating provisions of different forms and serving different purposes, and in Figs. 10.and 11, I have illustrated an arrangement in which the provisions within the chamber 8 may be and are shown as of the character illustrated in Figs. '7, 8 and 9, but in which the provisions in the remainder of the enclosed space are quite different from those illustrated in Figs. 1-6. The apparatus shown in Figs. 10 and 11 include a heat exchanger 85 adapted for use as a steam heating radiator at times when the room air needs to be heated and as a refrigerating or air cooling element at times when a room cooling effect is desired. The heat exchanger element 85 in the preferred construction illustrated, comprises a tube 88 bent back and forth to provide a plurality of parallel sections each extending the full length of the element and each of which passes through a corresponding plurality of spaced metal fins or plates 8! which are welded to the corresponding tube section. As shown there are four parallel sections of the tube 86 and four sets of fin-plates 81, though the number of 4 sections and the corresponding number of sets of fin plates may obviously be varied in accordance with conditions. As shown, the fin plates are rectangular outline ad the four sets of fin plates are placed close together so that they collectively form a heat exchange element rectangular in outline as shown in Fig 10. Each fin plate is preferably in the same plane with the corresponding fin plates on the other tube sections so that the fin plates collectively form a multiplicity of narrow side by side air passages extending through the heat exchange element from top to bottom. In the particular arrangement shown the pipe 86 is intended for air cooling purposes and receives a refrigerant fiuid at the right hand end of the heat exchanger through a refrigerant supply pipe 88.- The section of. the pipe 86 to which the supplypipe 88 is shownas directly connected' extends through one of the 'lower sets of fins 81 and'is connected at the left hand end of the exchanger through a loop or return portion 89 to a pipe section directly above. The opposite end of the latter section isconn'ected through a horizontal loop or return po'r'tionSlI to the second of the two upper sections of the pipe 86. Said. second upper section is connected at the left hand end of the heat exchanger to the fourth pipe section, which is one of the two lower pipe sections, by a vertical loop portion of the pipe 86 similar to, and back of the loop section 89. The

5 said fourth section of the pipe is connected at actress thecasing it is shaped to collect the condeiisate I formed and to pass it'to a suitable drainage outlet. As shown the bottom wall of the casing IOI is shaped to pass all. of the condensate to a cen-,

provide an air distributing chamber or space extending beneath the heat exchanger'for the full length of the latter. Suitably shaped and disposedbafiie members I02 in the'last mentioned 65 space break'up the vertical stream of air entering. the casing 'IOI from the fan outlet.I and distribute the air along the underside of the heat exchanger with suitable uniformity.

As'those skilled in the art will understand,

70 when a refrigerant fluid is passing through the pipe.86 of the heat exchanger, the air moving past the latterwill be cooled normally to a temperature below the dew point of the room air, with the result, that water will condense and drip 75 from the heat exchanger. The lower portion of statutes, we have illustrated and described preferred embodiments .of the present invention, those skilled in the art will understand that changes in the form of the apparatus disclosed herein may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the aptral annular pocket or receiving space I03 sur- 5 the right hand end of the heat exchange element rounding the discharge end I00 of the f n c to the refrigerant return pipe' III. The refrigering which is extended upward into the casing IOI ant supply and return pipes 88 and 9| are con-'- for this purpose. From the pocket I03 the conv nected to suitable refrigerant apparatus which in densate' passes awaythrough a suitable drain or some cases may form part of a refrigerating sys- Waste Pip W 10 tern adapted to cool the air in an entire building, The fans 91 draw in room air through the lower or in a number of rooms of one suite or section inlet 0961111188 44 in thev fr nt c v r pl te 34 of the building, or the refrigerating apparatus The casing may be p d u way o shown in Fig 10 d '11 may be a part of a permit some of the air discharged by the fan frjgerating unit individual the room such I to escape through the ports 45, but since, with c se the refrigerating compressor, condense etc" the arrangement shown, it is desirable to locate may be located in the space beneath a second winthe heat exchange! immediately beneath the top 1 i t room Shaped and enclosed as is the of the enclosure as shown in Figs. 10 and 11, and space in which the heat exchanger 05 is placed. since a high it of air Past the exchanger is For m hearing,- some or n f the sets f desirable to increase the heat transfer rate of the g fin 1 t 1 may'be t av by separate hori latter, and is made possible by the use of the t l steam pipefiections As Shown each fans 97, the casing IOI may well be arranged to of t t lower sets f fi m t is traversed by block the ports 45 so that all of the air passing a corresponding steam pipe 02 which is welded through it r p thmugh to {the fin plates traversed by it, as is the correwhen t apparatus shown In Figs- 10 and 11 15 sponding section of the pipe as. The two steam e e for room heating the s a need for pipes 2 receive steam in parallel fro a artificial humidification of the room atmosphere mon steam supply pipe 93 whi h Ordinarily will be experienced, and humidifying apparatus cludes a control valve 94 with which ordinary is Preferably located Within e p e p e thermostatic control-provisions (not shown) may for the Ventilating and a treating pp 3:) be associated in the usual manner. At the op- Th hum ifyin app rat h wn in 11 posite end of the heat exchanger th t o pipes comprises a water reservoir I05 receiving water 92 are connected to a common heating system as required thro h a wat r S pply p p I06 and return pipe 95. 7 g supplying water to an evaporative element I01 To increase-the heat exchange capacity of the which is heated by the steam passing to the heat 5 heat exchanger 85 so that a suitably large room ex hang elem nt thr ugh the s m s pp y P heating eifect and room cooling eiiect may be 93. An overflow pipe I08 running from the obtained with a heat exchanger 85 of suitably upper portion of the reservoir I 05 to the waste small size and compact arrangement, a circupipe I04 limits the height of water level in the 40 lating fan is preferably employed to move air reservoir and eliminates risk of the latter overthrough the airpassages betwen' the fin plates flowing. The reservoir I05 may contain a float 81. The ,air moving means provided for this operatin avalve contr llin the s pp y of Water Purpose in the arrangement shown in Figs. 10 to the reservoir I05 through the pipe I06, and and 11 comprises'a fan motor 96 mounted on the he evaporative el m t I01 may be of a charroom floorbetween'the-front cover plate 84 and a tor e c ve t vigorously l the Water the masonry wall portion 2' and a fan or blower ceived at its lower end from the reservoir at 91 mounted on each end of the motorsnsa. times when the rate or steam flow through the Associated with the fans 91' is arfan casing 00, pipe is relatively large, and to return to the they lower portion or -which is bifurcated and upper portion of the reservoir I05 water moved straddles the motor 86 and is formed with an through the water space of the evaporator by the i axial fan inlet 08 at each end of each fan. The boiling action therein. The above mentioned i undivided upper portion of the fan casing proper features of the humidifying apparatus Shown terminates 'in a central upwardly directed disneed not be further illustrated or described here- I charge throat I00 which opens centrally'through in, however, as the present invention is not con- .55 the bottom wall of a supplement or extension cerned with the particular form of humidifying casing IOI which surrounds the heat exchange apparatus employed, and the special form of that element 85 and has its open upper end immeapparatus illustrated, is disclosed and claimed diately beneath the outlet ports 46 in the horiin the copending application of Harry E. Campzontal cover portions 34'. bell, Serial No. 674,797, filed June 8, 1933. The casing IN is of sumcient vertical depth to While in accordance with the provisions of the m pended claims and that certain features of the invention may be used with advantage in certain cases without a corresponding use of other fea tures. It is particularly to be noted-that the form and extent of particular portions of the enclosed receiving space for ventilating and air treating provisions may vary in accordance with the conditions of use which may make it desirable to employ quite different provisions in different installations. It is to be noted also that while some features of the present invention are particularly useful in connection with window openings in relatively thick building walls, aside from the matter of wall thickness, the invention is independent of the character or type of wall construction. For example, the metal spandrel type of construction illustrated in Fig. 2 and other figures is in no wise essential to the present invention. On the contrary, the masonry wall portion 2' may extend to and form the outer face of the building wall as shown in Fig. 10.

Having now described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The combination with the wall of a room having a window casing therein and a recess space beneath and in front of said casing, of easing parts uniting with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including members in fixed and rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the room side ends of the end walls of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level of the lower portion of the window casing and horizontal parts extending from the upper ends of said corner posts to the corresponding ends of the lower portion of said window casing and connected to the latter, a vertical cover plate portion engaging a and supportedby said corner posts and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging and supported by said horizontal parts.

2. The combination with the wall of a room having a window casing therein and a recess space beneath and in front of said casing, of casing parts uniting with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including members in fixedand rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the room side ends of the end walls of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level of the lower portion of the window casing and horizontal parts extending from the upper ends of said corner posts to the corresponding ends of the lower portion of said window casing and connected to the latter, vertical and horizontal batten parts secured to the rear andundersides of said corner posts and horizontal parts, respectively, a vertical cover plate portion engaging the front sides of the vertical batten parts and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging the top sides of the horizontal batten parts.

3. The combination with the wall of a room with a window casing therein-and a recess space beneath and in front of said casing, of casing parts uniting'with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means; said casing parts including members in fixed and rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the outer ends of the end walls of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level'of the lower portion of the window casing and horizontal parts extending from the upper ends of said corner posts to the corresponding ends of the lower portion of said window casing and. connected to the latter, a floor member extending between and secured to the lower ends of said corner posts, a vertical cover plate portion engaging and supported by said corner posts and engaging said floor member, and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging and supported by said horizontal parts.

4. The combination with the wall of a room with a window casing therein and with a recess space beneath and in front of said'casing, of casingparts unitin'g with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including members in fixed and rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the outer ends of the end walls of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level of the lower portion of the window casing and horizontal parts extending from the upper ends of said corner posts to the corresponding ends of the lower portion of said casing and connected to the latter, and a floor member extending between and in overlapping engagement with said corner posts, a vertical cover plate portion engaging and supported by said corner posts and in overlapping relation with said floor member and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging and supported by said horizontal parts, and connections between said corner posts and floor member adjustable to accommodate different elevations of the corner post parts above the floor level.

5." The combination with the wall of a room with a window casing therein and with a recess space beneath and in front of said casing, of casing parts uniting with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including members in fixed and rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the outer ends of the end walls of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level of the lower portion of the window casing and horizontal'parts extending from the upper ends of said corner posts to the corresponding ends of the lower portion of said casing and connected to the latter, a vertical cover plate portion engaging and supported by said corner posts and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging and supported by portion of the window casing and the latter being formed with a pocket open at its top to receive said flange.

6. The combination with the wall of a room with a window casing therein and with a recess beneath and in front of said casing, of casing parts uniting with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including metallic members in fixed and rigid relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts of angle bar cross-section each having a flange parallel to and adjacent the front portion of the corresponding end wall of said space extending upward from the floor level to the level of the lower portion of the window casing and having a second flange extending toward the other corner post part, the last mentioned flange of each corner post forming an integral horizontal projection extending from the upper end of the corner post to the adjacent end of the lower portion of the window casing and connected to the latter, a vertical cover plate portion engaging and supported by said corner post parts and a horizontal cover plate portion engagwith a window casing. therein and with a recess space beneath and in front of said casing, of casing parts uniting with said wall to enclose a space including said recess and adapted to receive ventilating and air treating means, said casing parts including members in fixed relation with said wall and comprising vertical corner posts adjacent the outer ends of the endwalls of said space and horizontal parts extending from the upper ends of said comer posts to the corresponding endsof the lower portion of said casing, and a floor member extending between and secured to said corner posts and comprising an upstanding plate like portion, a vertical cover plate portion engaging "and, supported by said corner posts and overlapping said upstanding portion of said floor member at one side and havingresilient fingers engaging the other side of said portion, and a horizontal cover plate portion engaging and supported by said horizontal parts. I Y

8. The combination with the wall of a room having a window with its sill therein and a recess beneath and in front of said sill, of casing means uniting with said wall to form'an enclosed space including said recess, means within said casing dividing said space into two compartments one of which extends between the room side of said space and the other compartment and the latter of which extends under the \window sill casing andv has its walls formed mainly by parts permanently mounted in said wall but including a removable front wall member separating said compartments, said parts including a Z'chambered subsill between the window sill and hav ing an inlet for external air in its outer portion and having an outlet in the underside of the portion thereof directly above and opening into said other compartment.

9. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and having a box-dike chamber beneath said window and having an inlet passage opening externally of said wallffor supplying external air to said chamber, of a ventilating unit including a casing bodily in sertable in said chamber with a portion thereof projecting toward the room from said chamber and supported by the portion of said wall forming the bottom of said chamber, means including a motor driven fan within said casing for drawing external airthrough said passage into said casing and discharging it into the room,

v controlling means for said motor mounted on a portion of said casing external to said chamber, casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space 'into which the portion of said casing projecting from said chamber" extends, and means within said'space for the recirculation of room air therethrough and for subjecting the air so recirculated to a temperatare modifying effect. I

10. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and having a box-like -chamber'beneath 'saidlwindow and having an' inlet passage-opening externally of said wall for supplying external air to "said chamber of a ventilating unit including a casing bodily insertable in said chamber with a portion thereof projecting toward th'e room from said chamber and supported byethe portion of said wall forming the botto-m of said chamber; casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space into which the portion of said casing projects, means within said space for the, recirculation of room air therethrough and fors'ubjectfng the airso recirculated to a temperature modifying eflect, means including a motor driven fan and 'a damper within said casing for drawing external 'air at a regulated rate through said passage into said casing and dischargingit into the room, controlling means for said motor insaid space mounted on a portion of said casing external to said chaniber, said damper having an adjusting part extending into said space from said casing.

11. The combination with the wall'of a room having a window with its sill therein and having a box-like chamber beneath said sill and having an inlet passage opening externally of said wall for supplying external air to said chamber, of a' ventilating and air treating unit including a casing bodily insertable in said chamber and formed with an air inlet adapted to communicate with and receive air from said passage and formed with an uprising air delivery conduit extending upwardly in front of said window sill to a level adjacent the top of said sill and air moving and treating means mounted in-said casing.

'12. The combinationwith the wall of a room having a window with its sill therein and having a box-like chamber beneath said sill, of a chambered air intake member secured to said sill and forming an upper portion of the wall of said ternally of said wall, a ventilating and air treating unit including a casing bodily insertable in said 0 her and formed with an air inlet adapted to receive air from said passage and formed with an uprising air delivery conduit extending upwardly in front of said window sill to a level adjacent the top of said sill andair moving means in said casing.

13. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and a box-like compartment extending'beneath the window and having an inlet passage directly beneath the window for the passage of outside air into saicbcompartment, of a ventilating and air treating unit comprising a casing bodily insertable in said compartment through the front side of the latter and having an inlet adapted to receive air from said passage and said inlet to said outlet and air filtering means in said casing between the inlet thereof and said of a ventilating and air treating unit comprising a casing bodily insertable in said compartment an inlet adapted to receive air from said passage through the fFont side of the latter and having and having anjoutlet for the discharge -of air into thero'om, and means in said casing for preventing the' transmission of external noises into the roomthrough said'casing.

15. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and a box-like compartment extending beneath the window and having an inlet passage directly-beneath the window for the passage of outsideair'into said compartment, of a ventilating and air treating unit comprising a casing bodily insertable in said cor npartment through the front side of the latter and having an inlet adapted to receive air fromsaid passage and having an outlet for the discharge of 'air into the room. and ventilating and air "chamber, of a casing bodily insertable in said chamber and formed with an inlet adapted to receive air from said outlet and formed with an uprising air outlet conduit extendng upward in front of the lower portion of the window sill, means within said casing for moving air from the inlet 20 thereof through said outlet, casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space and including a vertical portion in front of and spaced away from the front side of said unit casing and atop portion extending from the upper edge of 25 said vertical portion to the window sill, said casing means being formed with an outlet above said delivery conduit and with another outlet in its upper portion and with a lower inlet, and means within said space and external to said casing for drawing room air in through said inlet and returning it to the room through said other outlet. 17. The combination with the wall of a room having a window with its sill therein and having a recess beneath and in front of said window, the recessspace including a box-like chamber extending beneath said sill, and said wall having a passage with an inlet opening at the outer side of the wall and an outlet opening into said compartment, of a casing bodily insertable in said .chamber and formed with an inlet adapted to receive air from said outlet and having an outlet in the front portion of its top wall, means within said casing for moving air from the inlet thereof through said outlet therefrom, casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space and including a vertical portion in front of and spaced away from the front side of said casing and a top portion extending from the upper edge of said vertical portion to the window sill, said casing means being formed with an air outlet above said casing outlet and with another upper outlet and with a lower inlet, means within said space and external to said casing for drawing room air in through said inlet and returning it to the room through said other outlet and means within said space for segregating the air flows to the first mentioned outlet and said other outlet.

18. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and a recess beneath and in front of said window, of easing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space including said recess andmeans within said casing dividing said.- space into two compartments; one of which extends between the room side of said space and the other compartment and the latter extending under the window casing and having a portion of its wall formed by metallic members permanently mounted in said wall, brackets secured to said wall portion and extending into one compartment, anda heat exchanger in the last mentioned compartment supported by said brackets.

19. The combination with the wall of a room 2,074,622 treating means mounted in said casing compris having a window therein and a recess beneath and in front of said window, of casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosing space including said recess, means within said casing dividing said space into two compartments one of which is interposed between the room side of said space and the other compartment, means for recirculating room air through one compartment, means for introducing external air into said room through said other compartment, means for filtering said external air in its passage through said other compartment comprising a filter therein, and a hollow member extending across said one compartment through which said filter is insertable in and removable from said other ,eompartment.

20. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and having a box-like chamber beneath saidwindow and open at its front side and having an inlet passage opening externally of said wall for supplying external air to said chamber, of a ventilating unit including a casing bodily insertable in said chamber and formed with an air inlet adapted to communicate with and receive air from said passage and with an outlet for the discharge of air into the room, air filtering means in said casing, casing means uniting with said wall to form a ventilating and air treating compartment between the room and 'said chamber, and means'for moving room air front wall extending across said compartment and the front wall of said compartment having an opening in register with said extension, and said filtering means being insertable and removable through said opening and extension.

21. The combination with the wall of a room having a window therein and a recess beneath and in front of said opening, of casing means uniting with said wall to form an enclosed space including said recess, means within said casing dividingsaid space into two compartments, one of which is interposed between the room side of said space and the other compartment and supported by the portion of said wall forming the bottom of said recess, mechanism within said other compartment for moving external air into the latter and thence into the room and controlling means forjsaid mechanismincluding a portion located in said one compartment and an operating portion extending out of the last mentioned compartment into the room.

22. The combination with the wall of a room having a window opening therein and a notch open at its top directly beneath the window opening, of a -chambered metallic structure at the bottom of the window opening and extending across the top of' said notch, said structure including a window sill portion, and a subjacent chamber space open at the outer side of the wall to receive external air, and a ventilating unit including a wall for-a room having a window opening therein located at a substantial distance above the room floor and having a notch-like recess therein directly beneath said window opening; a hollow 10 in and removable from said recess and having an inlet opening communicating with the outlet end of the passage in said window sill and an outlet opening for' the discharge of air into the room, and a motor-blower unit secured in said casing and forming a part of said ventilating unit and operable to draw air from the outside through said passage and said recess and discharge such air into said room.

' ALLSTON SARGENT.

ADDISON C. ARMSTRONG. 10

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3181795 *Oct 17, 1961May 4, 1965Triangle Sheet Metal Works IncEnclosure structure
US4572282 *Oct 20, 1983Feb 25, 1986Yoshida Kogyo K.K.Ventilation system for building
US4799539 *Jun 1, 1987Jan 24, 1989Advanced Design & Manufacture LimitedThermally efficient room ventilator
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/490.2, 165/54, 165/67, 165/48.1, 165/59, 165/135
International ClassificationF24F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24F1/00
European ClassificationF24F1/00