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Publication numberUS2074635 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1937
Filing dateApr 13, 1935
Priority dateApr 13, 1935
Publication numberUS 2074635 A, US 2074635A, US-A-2074635, US2074635 A, US2074635A
InventorsJames Adams Simpson
Original AssigneeJames Adams Simpson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lease forming reed
US 2074635 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 1937 s. J. ADAMS f 2,074,535

A LEASE FORMING REED Filed April 13, 1935 2 Sheets-fsheet l mpsn Jdovms,

1, @MM/mf March 23; 1937. s, 1 ADAMS 1 2,074,635

LEASE `FORMING REED Filed April 13, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 51272/95027/ Lcianz) l Patented Mar. 23, 1937 UNLTED ,STATES PATENT OFFICE v musas LEASE FoRMING REED l Simpson James Adams, Greenville, S. C.-

pplication April 13, 1935, serial No. 16,250

14 claims.

My invention relates to a reed for forming a lease in a warp, land in particular to a reed for l forming a lease in a warp having a large number of ends per inch. My lease forming reed is par- 5 ticularly useful in forming a lease in the warp on a Slasher. My invention also involves a novel method of forming an end-and-end lease in warp.

In the manufacture of fancy goods involving Special patterns, it is common practice in placing a new warp beam into a loom to take the warp beam from the Slasher and send it to the drawingin room where the warp ends are manually combed out and drawing-in operators manually draw the ends through the drop wires, through the harness, and through the loom reedaccording to the pattern desired, and then the beam, drop wires, harness and reed are sent to the loom and installed. The manual drawing-in operations involved in this practice are tedious, require considerable time, and are Subject to variations due to human error.

According to my invention, I provide a reed for operation in connection with a Slasher to form a lease in the warp as it is delivered from the Slasher onto the warp beam, and by means of this lease, it is possible to use a. tying-in machine to join the ends of the new warp beam onto the ends of the warp which is running out in the loom, thereby avoiding the expensive and time consuming manual drawing-in operation referred to above. My invention reduces the 'manual drawing-in operations to only one Voperation for each new pattern.

It has heretofore been proposed to form a lease in the Slasher warp at a point where the warp is fed from the warp creel to the sizing vat, but in forming a lease in this manner, the lease must be carried through the Slasher over 'to the warp beam at the end of the Slasher, and these 'operations make it necessary to shut down the Slasher for one-third of the working time. 'I'his method requires three operators to form and carry over the lease every time a beam is to be doifed. Furthermore. in case of rayon warp, a considerable quantogether. This method also makes it necessary to remove all parting bars in carrying the lease over the Slasher and then replace the bars after the lease has been carried over.

A further object of my invention is to devise I a reed which will form an end and end lease in tity of the rayon yarn is damaged and lost by .l

(ci. zzz-'40) the warp at the Slasher comb without having to remove the parting rods from the Slasher.

Another object of my invention is to devise a reed for forming a lease in the warp of the Slasher which can be operated by one operator, and by 5 which a complete lease may be formed quickly and without having to stop the Slasher long enough to burn the yarn.

Still another object of my invention is to devise a lease forming reed in which the dents or 10 splits are open at one end to facilitate threading and to `provide for the lateral support of the free ends of the Splits.

Lease forming reeds heretofore commonly used will accommodate only one thread per reed space, 15 but the reed of my invention will accommodate more than one thread per space. For example, it is possible according to my invention, to operate the reed with 12 ends per dent, and, in case there are 16 dents per inch, a Gil-inch reed will 20 accommodate 11,520 ends.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a Schematic diagram showing a portion of a Slasher in Side elevation with my lease forming reed in normal op- 25 erating position;

Figure 2 is a schematic diagram like Figure 1 showingmy lease forming reed operated to a position to form the iirst shed of the lease;

Figure 3 is a Schematic diagram like Figures 30 1 and 2 showing the reed in a position for forming the second shed of. the lease;

Figures'4 and 4a illustrate one arrangement for moving the reed in horizontal and vertical directions; Figure 4a being a sectional view of Fig. 4 35 along line la-la;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary front elevational view showing the details of construction of my lease forming reed, and also illustrating the normal running position oi' the warp ends with respect to 40 the reed.i

Figures 5a, 5b and 5c illustrate various positions oi the reed in forming one shed of the lease; and

Figures 5d, 5e, -5f and 5g illustrate' various 45 positions of the reed in forming the second shed ofthe lease.

It will be understood that the drawings are not to scale, and many dimensions have been exaggerated for the sake of clearnes's of illustration.l

For the purpose of illustrating my invention, it will be described in connection'with a Slasher machine of well known construction, the details of which need not be described here. It is sumcient to state that a Slasher includes a creel on 55 which a number of beams of warp are placed, a sizing vat through which the warp sheets from the beams are passed for sizing the warp, a dry-v ing cylinder over which the ywarp sheets pass in 5 superposed relation from the sizing vat, -a comb through which the warp ends are guided onto la presser roll operatingin connection with a power driven delivery roll, and a power driven beam forreceiving the warp. Usually, parting bars are provided between the creel and the sizing vat, and also between the drying cylinder,

and the comb, for keeping the sheets of the various beams of warp separated as they pass through the sIaSher. Examples of slasher machines will be found in U. S. patents to Cook 1,944,221 and Johnson 1,966,097.

In Figure 1, I have shown six sheets of warp ends A, B, C, D, E and F as they are fed from the Slasher cylinder (not shown) through my lease forming reed I, through the slasher comb 2 and onto the presser roll 3, from which point the warp passes around the delivery roll 3a, over another presser roll and onto .the receiving beam (not shown). The various warp sheets pass throughthe reed I in vertically spaced planes.

While I prefer a uniform vertical spacing of the warp sheets in passing through the reed I, it will be obvious that a uniform spacing is not essential. The arrangement is such that one warp end from each sheet passes throughthe groove or space between adjacent splits on the reed, so that six ends lie in each space between adjacent splits.

The details of construction of the reed are illustrated in Figure 5 which is a fragmentary view showing one end of the reed and illustrating only three splits. The reed is of a comb-like construction comprising `a back bar Ia from which is supported a plurality of splits or dents Ib formed of thin metallic strips. Eachl split is provided 'with a plurality of hook elements Ic preferably uniformly spaced along the length of the split as shown. The hook elements are preferably formed l. by stamping hook portions from the body of the split, but they may be formed and supported upon the splits in any desired manner. 'I'he hooks extend into the space between adjacent splits, but sufficient clearance is provided be- -tween each hook and the adjacent `split to,per

mit the warp end to pass around the hook freely in either direction. The opening of the hooi; is Asufliciently viide to freely receive a warp end. The upper ends of the splits are free and unsupported except 'for' the lateral support provided by transverse crimps Id formed near the upper ends of the splits, the crimps in one split being vertically displaced with respect to the crimps in the adjacent splits as shown in Figure 5. It will be clear that the crimps., Id provide lateral support;l for the free ends of the splits, but due to the staggered relation ofthe crimps in adjacent splits, and to the spring-like character of the splits, the reed may be threaded by introducing the warp ends between the free ends of the splits` and forcing the warp ends down betweenthe crimps and the adjacent splits with which they are in contact. This-arrangement permits quick threading of the reedv and at the same time prevents accidental removal of the warp ends from the reed. Rigid end bars Ie are supported at each end of the backbar 'Ia and provide end support for the splits Ib. It will be seen that the crimps Id constitute lateral projections on the free ends of the splits for giving lateral support, and these lateral projections aovaeae the drawings.

may assume other forms than crimps in the splits. y

Figure 5 shows the relation between the ends in the various warp sheets as they pass through the reed in the normal running position. It will be seen that the ends in the warp sheets A, B, C, D, E and F pass through the reed in horizontal sheets uniformly spaced vertically. Also the arrangement is such that in the normal running position of the reed, two warp ends are located above each hook element. The reed I is mounted upon the slasher frame by an arrangement illusytrated in Figure 4 so that the reed may be moved to the left or to the right from the normal position shown in Figure 5 and may also be moved vertically upward from the position shown in Figure 5.

In forming a lease in the warp, it is necessary to select alternate ends in each space of the reed and separate these ends from the remaining ends and then insert a lease rod between the twogroups. After this, the ends of the two groups are moved so that they exchange positions and thereby form a lease of crossed-shed arrangement in which adjacent threads in the lease lie in different sheds andcross each other at an angle, so that a tying-in machine can pick up only one end of the warp at a time. Assume that theloom beam on the Slasher is ready to doi and it is necessary to form a lease in the warp; the Slasher is stopped and the reed is moved to the left of the normal position shown in Figure 5, so that all of the warp ends bear against the'splits above their respective hook elements; the reed is then moved upwardly so the hook elements engage the ends of warp sheets A, C and E as shown in Figure 5a. The reed is then moved to the right until the warp ends of sheets B, D and F lie against the adjacent splits as shown in Figure 5b, and then the reed is moved vertically upward to a position shcwnin Figure 5c where it will be seen that the ends of sheets A, C and E have been carried up with the reed, and the ends of sheets B, D and F have passed around the hooks andoccupy a position at the bottom of the reed spaces, thereby separating alternate ends into an upper group and a lower group, as illustrated in Figure 2 of A lease rod 5 is now inserted between the two groups of ends as shown in Figure 2, and by moving the lease rod up near the comb 2, a lease string 6 may be inserted be- -tween lthe two groups of ends on the. other side 1 bear against the back of the reed splits, 'and the reedis then moved upwardly so the hooks Ic lie opposite the spaces between the ends in sheets A-B, C-D and E-F, as shown in Figure 5d.

Thereed is then moved to the left, and then upl wardly, until hooks Ic engage the ends of sheets BL, D and F as shown in Figure 5e. The reed is next moved to the right so that the ends in sheets A, C and E bear against the back of adjacent splits, as shown in Figure 5f, and then upwardly to a position illustrated in Figure 5g so that the ends ofA sheets lB, `D and F are carried upwardly and are separated into a group fromthe ends of sheets A, C and E which lie at the bottom of the spaces in the reed, as shown also 1n Figure .3 of the drawings. In this position of the reed, the lease rod is again inserted in the shed and the lease string 6 is returned through the shed on the other side of the comb as shown 5 at 6' in Fig. 3. Upon tying the ends of the lease string the lease is complete, and the lease rod 5 may be removed and the reed I returned to its normal position. After forming the lease, ,the warpis advanceduntil the lease reaches the 10 loom beam, and the beam is then doied in the usual manner.

After doiling the beam, it may be taken directly to the loom and, by means of a portable .tying-ln machine, the ends of the new beam may be joined to' the ends of the warp which is running out on the loom. If desired, instead of performing the tying-in operations at the loom, the new beam may be Vsent from the slasher to the drawing-in room where the tying-in operations are performed on a regular tying-in machine. With this procedure, it will be understood that the ends of the warp which is running out in the loom are knotted to prevent withdrawal from the loom drop wires, harness and reed, and the warp issevered from the cloth by cutting the cloth at a point to leave a. short length of cloth on the front side of the reed to prevent withdrawal of the warp ends, and then the drop wires, harness and reed are removed from the loom and sent to the drawing-inroom where the tying-in operations are performed by machine. The machine tying-in operation is made possible by reason of the lease in the warp on tHe new beam and also by reason of the fact that a lease can be readily formed in the old warp to which the new warp is to be joined.

The arrangement for mounting and moving gears 9ct- 9a engaging racks 1a--1a on the two ends of frame 1, see Fig. 4a, and by which the frame 1, with the reed, may. be moved vertically by hand wheels Sli-9b secured at each end of the shaft 9. On the opposite side of frame 1 from racks 1a are arranged racks 1b-1b, and a pair of cooperating pawl: Illa-Illa are carried by a shaft I0 journaled onvthe frame 8A 'Ihe 5 pawls are normally held in engagement with racks 1b by a weighted lever II and serve to hold frame 1 iny any desired adjusted elevation. The pawls are released by lever II when the reed is to be lowered. By making the notches in racks 1b ofthe proper pitch with respect to the vertical separation between wiarp. sheets, the racks will serve as a standard by which the proper operation of the reed may be determined, in other words, the required movement in any operation may be stated in terms of rackl frame. A pin I 2b secured to side beam I2a maintains the rack on 8m in contact with gear I3. An operating lever I4 is secured to the gear I3 by which the frame 8, and with it the frame 1 and also the reed, may be moved transversely of the Slasher frame.

It will be clear from the above that by operating lever I i, the reed may be moved either to the right or to the left of the normal operating position shown inFig. 5, and by operating hand wheels 9b the reed may be moved vertically upward from the normal position. Other arrangements for mounting and moving the reed in horizontal and vertical directions will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

While I have shown one form of reed in which the hooks face towards the open ends of the splits and the reed is raised above the normal position in forming a lease, the reed may be constructed so the hooks are reversed from the position shown, so they face the back bar, and the reed mounted so that it would be moved downwardly from normal position -to form the lease. In this arrangement, a stop-bar would be clamped across the reed just below the upper ends of the splits to prevent the warp ends from pulling out of the reed while a lease is being formed.

WhileE-I have shown and described my lease forming reed in connection with a slasher where it is particularly useful, it will be obvious that it may be used lin any situation where it is desired torform a lease in a warp having a large number of ends per inch.

I have herein described the principle of my invention and illustrated a preferred embodiment thereof. Various modifications will occur to those skilled in the art, and I desire it to be understood that all modiiications which fall within* the terms of the appended claims are to be considered as falling within the scope of my invention.

What I claim is:

l. A leasing reed comprising a plurality of splits supported in parallel spaced relation, and a plurality of hook elements supported on each split in spaced relation along the length thereof, said hook elements being positioned to engage warp ends lying to one side of the center of the reed space but to allow warp ends to freely pass around the hooks on the other side of the center of the reed space.

2. A leasing reed comprising a plurality of splits supported in parallel spaced relation, and a plurality of hook elements supported on each split in'spaced relation along the length thereof, said hook elements being so positioned that upon relative movement between the reed and warp ends in a direction parallel to the splits the hooks engage all warp ends bearing against the supporting split,`but freely pass all warp ends bearing against the adjacent split.

3. A leasing reed comprising a back bar supporting a plurality of equally spaced splits, and a plurality of hook elements supported on each split in spaced relation along thelength thereof, said hook elements being arranged to extend into the space between the supporting split and an adjacent split but suillciently spaced from the adjacent split to allow warp ends to freely pass around said hooks in either direction.

4. In combination, a leasing reed comprising a plurality of spaced splits ,each provided with a plurality of hooks spaced along the length thereof, means for guiding a plurality of warp sheetsV -through said reed in vertically spaced relation with each reed' space receiving one warp end from each sheet and two warp ends above each hook element, and means vtor moving .the reed transversely of the sheetsboth horizontally and vertically.

5 5. In combination, a leasing reed comprising a plurality of spaced splits each provided with a plurality ofhooks spaced along the length thereof, means for guiding warp ends through each space of said reed with two ends located between each pair of adjacent hooks, and means for mov# ing said reed transverselyof the warp in two directions to se ectively engage said hooks 4with one or the other of the ends in each pair' of ends.

6. In combination, a warp beam receiving at 15 least four sheets of warp arranged in' superposed relation, a leasing reed through which saidwarp sheets pass to said beam, parting bars for guiding said sheets through said reed in vertically spaced relation with each space in the reed receiving one warp end from each sheet, a hook element supportedAon each Vsplit below each pair of ends, each hook being positioned to engage warp ends bearing against the supporting split but to pass warp ends bearing against the adjacent split, and means for moving said reed transversely of said sheets both horizontally and vertically.

7. The method of forming a lease in warp having a. large number of ends per inch which 'consists in arranging the ends of the warp in four or more sheets arranged in superposed spaced vertical relation, simultaneously engaging the ends of the even numbered sheets and moving the same vertically beyond the odd numbered sheets to form a shed between the even numbered sheets and the odd numbered sheets, in'- serting a leasing element in the shed, releasing said ends, simultaneously engaging the ends of the odd numbered sheets and moving the same vertically beyond the even numbered sheets to 40, form a second shed between the odd numbered and even numbered sheets but in reverse position, and inserting a leasing element in the second shed.

8. The method of forming a lease in warp on 45 a Warp dressing machine providedwith a leasing reed comprising a plurality of spaced vertlcal splits, each provided with a hook element intermediate the ends thereof, said hook element being positioned to engage warp ends bearing against the supporting split but to paas warp ends bearing against thel adjacent splits, which method consists in arranging the warp ends to pass through said reed in four or more sheets arranged in superposed spaced vertical relation, 55 with one end from eachsheet passing through each spacevof the reed, shifting said reed transversely of said warp sheets both horizontally and vertically to engage alternate ends by said hooks and to shift said engaged ends vertically beyond 60 the. unhooked ends, thereby forming 'a shed between the even numbered sheets and the odd numbered sheets, inserting a leasing element through the shed so formed, returning said reed to its original position to release said warp ends, 65 shifting said reed transversely of said warp sheets both horizontallyI and vertically to engage the alternate ends which previously were not engaged, and moving said reed to carry said engaged ends vertically beyond saidunhooked ends 70'to form a second shed'between the even numbered sheets and the odd numbered sheets in reverse position, passing a leasing element through the second` shed, and returning said reed to its original position.

75 9. The method'of forming a lease in warp on a warp dressing machine provided with a leasing reed comprising a plurality of spaced vertical splits each provided with a plurality of hooks spaced along the length `thereof, each hook being positioned to engage warp ends bearing against the supporting split but to pass warp ends bearing against the adjacent split, which method consists in arranging the warp ends in four or more sheets in superposed spaced vertical relation, with one end from each sheet passing through each space of the reed and two spaced ends arranged above each hook element, shifting said reed transversely of said warp sheets both horizontally and vertically to engage one end of each pair'bysaid hooks, shifting said reed horizontally to allow the other end of each pair to bear against the adjacent split, shifting said reed verticallyy so that the hooked ends pass the unhooked ends and the lower-most hooked sheet of ends is moved vertically beyond the uppermost sheet of unhooked ends, inserting a leasing thread through the shed of Warp sheets so formed, returning said reed to its original position to release said warp ends, shifting said reed transversely of the Warp sheets vertically and horizontally to engage the other warp end of each pair, shifting said reed horizontally and vertically to carry said engaged warp sheets vertically beyond the unhooked warp sheets, inserting a second leasing string between the shed so formed, and returning said leasing reed to its original position.

l0. The method of manipulating the apparatus of claim 6t0 form an end-and-end lease in the warp which consists in moving the reed'transversely of said sheets both horizontally and vertically to engage theends of the odd numbered sheets and to movethe-sam vertically beyond the ends of the even numbered sheets and to thereby form a shed between the odd-numbered and even-numbered sheets, passing a leasing element through the shed, returning the reed to its original position to release said ends, moving the reed transversely of the sheets both horizontally and vertically to engage the ends of the even-numbered sheets and to carrythe same vertically beyond the ends of the odd-numbered sheets and thereby form a shed between the evennumbered and odd-numbered sheets in reverse position, passing a leasing element through the 11. A leasing reed comprising a back bar, a

plurality of sheet metal splits supported at one end from said back bar, 'the spaces between said splits being open at the other end, each split being provided with a lateral projection formed near the free end thereof and extending. into contact with an adjacent split, the projections on adjacent splits being staggered in position along the splits, aplurality of hook elements supported on each split in spaced relation along the length thereof, said hook elements being positioned to engage warp ends lying to one side of the center of the reed space but to allow warp ends to freely pass around the hooks on the other side of the center of the reed space, and rigid end members secured to the ends of said back bar and embracing said splits, said end members cooperating Withthe lateral projections on said splits to provide lateral support for lthe free ends of said splits.

12. 'Ihe method of forming a lease in warp on a warp dressing machine provided with a leasing reed comprising a plurality of spaced vertical splits each provided with a hook element, the hooks on adjacent splits being spaced apart to permit warp ends to pass between said hooks, which method consists in arranging the warp ends in four or more horizontal sheets in superposed spaced vertical. relation, the ends of said horizontal sheets being arranged in a yplurality of vertical rows, one vertical row to each split and each row containing'an end from each horizontal sheet, shiftingl said reed vertically and causing relative horizontal'transverse movement between said warp ends and said hook elements to engage alternate ends inl said vertical rows, shifting said reed to carry said engaged ends vertically beyond theV unhooked ends thereby forming a shed between the even numbered sheets and the'odd numbered sheets, inserting a leasing element throughy the shed so formed, returning said reed to its original position to release saidl warp ends, again shifting said reed vertically and causing relative horizontal transverse movement between said ends and said reed to engage the alternate ends which previously were not engaged,

andmoving said reed to carry said engaged ends vertically beyond said unhooked ends to form a second shed between the even numbered sheets and the odd numbered sheets in reverse position, passing a leasing element through the second shed and returning said reed to its original position.

13. A reed comprising aback bar supporting a plurality of equally spaced splits, and a pluraiity oi' hook elements supported on each split in spaced relation along the length thereof, said hook elements being arranged in a plurality of parallel rows substantially 'parallel with said back bar.

14. A reed comprising a back bar supporting a plurality of equally spaced splits, and a plurality oif hook elements supported on each split in spaced relation along the length lthereof, said hook elements being arranged in a plurality of parallel rowssubstantially parallel withsaid -back bar, each split being provided with a hook element located in each parallel row of hooks.

SIMPSON J. ADAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2938259 *Nov 17, 1958May 31, 1960Benninger Ag MaschfLeasing device
US3164883 *Dec 21, 1962Jan 12, 1965Fleischer Svend Sigur ChristieComb for warp leasing
US3678548 *Nov 12, 1970Jul 25, 1972Lorraine De Preparation TextilLeasing apparatus and method
US4119342 *Apr 29, 1977Oct 10, 1978Jones Claude CConvertible chair structure
DE1101305B *Nov 22, 1958Mar 2, 1961Benninger Ag MaschfFadenkreuzvorrichtung fuer Schaer-maschinen
DE3018950A1 *May 17, 1980Nov 26, 1981Krueckels Maschf Zell JMechanical leasing - uses cheap hooked blade and separately adjustable lease rods
Classifications
U.S. Classification28/199, 139/82
International ClassificationD03J1/00, D03J1/14
Cooperative ClassificationD03J1/14
European ClassificationD03J1/14