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Publication numberUS2075411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1937
Filing dateJul 21, 1934
Priority dateJul 21, 1934
Publication numberUS 2075411 A, US 2075411A, US-A-2075411, US2075411 A, US2075411A
InventorsVon Mertens Ernest K
Original AssigneeGroov Pin Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fastener stud
US 2075411 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. 35 original stud stock from, which Patented Mar. 30, 1937 PATENT o-FF ca 'FASTENER STUD Ernest k. von Martens, New York, N. Y., as-

signor to Groovdin Corporation, Long Island City, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application July 21, 1934, Serial No. 736,326 6 Claims. (01. 85-44) My present invention relates to fastener studs and while by no means limited to such use, has specialized utility as aiso-called lace fastener for automobile bodies.

An object of the invention is to provide a fastener of the above type which,'wh ile of simple construction easily produced and easy to apply, is

substantially perfect in its effectiveness to keep the laceor binding securely in place, substantially regardless of how severe the vibration .or other loosening impulse may be during ,use of the vehicle.

' Another object is to provide a stud of the above.

type which can be applied with the use of conventional tools, including 'a hammer -or mallet and a screw driver, and which affords a fastener quite" as-effective as a-rivet. Another object is to provide an expeditious method of producing the stud and simple appa- ,ratus for carrying out said method, by a simple rolling action in which are performed a sequence ofsteps resulting in the'speclalized stud of this invention.

In the accompanying drawing, in which is A shown one of various possible embodiments of the several features of the invntiori,

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a preferred form of lace fastener stud,

Fig. 2 is a' cross-sectional view on a larger scale taken on the line 2-2 of Fig, 1,

\ Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view showing the stud applied in use,

1 Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 4-?! of Fig. 5,

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view showing. the

my specialized fastener stud is produced,

6 is a similar view showing the stockafter the first rolling step, h Fig. '7 is a similar view showing the stock after the second rolling step,

. Fig. 8 is a similar view showing the completed stud,

Fig. 9 is a plan view of a preferred rolling plate employed in producing the stud,

Fig. 10 is a sectional .view taken on line llllll of Fig. 9, and on a. larger scale,

' Fig-11 is a sectional view taken on line ll-.-l l of Fig. 9, on a larger scale, and

w Fig. 12 is a. top plan view illustrating the rolling operation.

. Referring now to the drawing, the preferred form of studas'shown in theperspective view of Fig. 1 and as'al so shown in use in Fig. 3, preferably made of machine steel stock, comprises a generally cylindrical shank III a head with aiillister slot l2 at one end and tapered at l3 to a point It at the other end.. Threads or This l5 triangular in cross-section protrude from the shank, merging at their lower ends at It with the upper end of the tapered point lit at their 5 lower ends below the upper end of the tapered point and terminating sharply at their upper ends H, in a common plane, spaced from and parallel to the head II, leaving a substantial cylindrical portion near the upper end of the shank un- 10 threaded, as at l8. Preferably, as appears best in Fig. 2, the threads, while of uniform pitch, are spaced at non-uniform intervals peripherally of the shank, for a purpose which will appea presently.

In Fig. 3 is shown in cross-sectional view, a specialized application of the stud as a lace fastener for automobiles. It is 'used to attach the thick ,lace or binding 20 ordinarily used as a rattle-preventing support-for the hood, the win- 'dows-and other parts of an automobile with rat spect to the contiguous metal body plate 2|. For such application, the stud is driven by a hammer or mallet,,so that its sharp point' It penetrates the lace 20 and the sheet metal plate 2|. after, the stud is driven further by a screw driver applied to the fillister slot l2 in which operation, the triangular threads or ribs It will cut corresponding notches 22 into the metal plate 2| and immediately af er the blunt extremities ll of said 30 threads or ribs ave passed the lower orconcealed face of the plate 2|,. the further turning of the flliister head will bring the blunt upper ends of the ,threads outpof registry with the notches 22 they have cut, but the ends of said threads or ribs 35 will remain infirm engagement with the under face of the metal plate 2|, all as shown in Fig. 4.

Thus, the lace will be'effectively compressed betweenthe head I l of the stud and the plate 2 l ,the thickness of the :lace or binding 20 being com- 4 pacted exactly'to the height afforded by the unv threaded portion N3 of the shank which extends above plate 2|.

By the preferred arrangement described,

. whereby the threads 15 while 01' equal pitch;are 45 equally spaced threads will enterv into the one unique position of exact registry with the cor.-

responding notches 2251s so small as to be negli- 55",

Theregible. Where the threads are equally spaced, -on the other hand, it is clear that such registry is much more' likely to occur.

In Figs. 5 to 12, is illustrated a preferred method of, and apparatus for producing the stud shown in Figs. 1 to-3, and previously described. Referring first'to Figs. 5 to 8, there is shown in Fig. 5, the stock from which the studof Fig. 1 is produced. This stock comprises a smoothcylinl drical shank S with a tapered point l3 and a head II with a fillister slot 12. -According to the invention, the ,thread is preferably rolled on said stud. For this purpose, as shown in Fig. 6, the first operation consists in rolling such thread l5 from the wider end of the tapered point substantially up to the fillister head II.

As shown in Fig. 7, the next step consists in flattening out the upper portions of the rolled threads of Fig. 6 by forcing or rolling the same back into the cylindrical stock, in which operation, however, a web 23v is thrown up, which bridges the gaps between the upper blunt extremities of the remaining thread segments Hi.

The next and final step resulting in the final stud product of Fig. 8, consists in another rolling operation in the immediate vicinity of the web 23, which is thereby rolled into and flush with the cylindrical shank of the stud.

The succession of rolling steps above set forth 30 and illustrated in Figs. 5 to 8, may be performed by any of a variety of apparatus, but it is preferably accomplished by the rolling plate apparatus shown in Figs; 9 to 12. As best shown in Figs, 9, 10 and 11, each of 35 the plates 25, is of steel and has parallel teeth 24 extending obliquely across the plate, and separated by oblique grooves 26 therebetween, which, of course, correspond in cross-section to the triangular cross-section of the threads to be rolled. 0 The teeth 24 are non-euniform in width, a shown, to attain the corresponding non-uniform spacing of the threads described, and best shown in Fig. 2.

In the rolling operation, the plates are preferably maintained vertical, as shown in Fig. 12,

I 45 while the head of the stock shown in Fi 5 rests upon their upper edges, the two plates 25 in operation being driven in opposite direction with the exertion of pressure against the shanks S therebetween.

As shown'in Figs. 9, 10 and 11, each of the plates has a flat rectangular area 21, without grooves, and depressed slightly, say about halfway the depth of grooves 26,.and extending along the upper edge of the plate, from the right ends thereof. This area is of width' equal to the length of the unthreaded shank portion l8 of the stud and is of length at least twice the circumferential length of the stud. The grooves 26 only reach the rim of the rectangular area-21, but those of the teeth 24' that reach the lower edge of the right or outer half of said area extend slightly beyond said edge, as shown at 28, and are of height slightly greater than the remaining teeth,

as appears clearly in the drawing.

It will be immediately apparent that in the rolling operation, the threads 26 at the left end of the plate are effective to roll the entire length of thread, as shown in Fig. '6. As the rolling 75 the shank, teeth 24 slightly reduce the diameter of the corresponding part of the stud, while the upper ends 28 of said teeth, force the metal of web 23 into the cylindrical stock to produce the final product shown in Fig. 8. g

It will thus beseen that there is herein described apparatus in which the several features of this invention are embodied, and which apparatus in its action attains the various objects of the invention and is well suited to meet the requirements of practical use.

As many changes could bemade in the above construction, and many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A fastener stud having a head with a fillister v slot and a tapered point and including a shank tapering in width and height to afford entering points.

2. A fastener stud having a tapered point, a generally cylindrical shank and a head, said shank having steep threads integral therewith extending from below the upper end of said tapered point and terminating sharply at a substantial distance from the head. the lengths of thread along the shank being uniform in cross section and the lengths thereof along the tapered point, tapering in width and height to af- -ford entering points.

3. A fastener stud having a shank, a head with a flllister slot and a plurality of threads integral with said shank, with their upper ends terminating sharply in a plane parallel to "and at a substantial distance from said head,'said threads having uniform pitch but spaced from each other at non-uniform intervals.

4. A threaded fastener stud comprising a metal shankhaving a tapered point'at one end and a fillister head at the other end, paid stud having four threads unitary with the shank thereof, triangular in cross-section, of uniform pitch but at non-uniform intervals, each of said threads merging at its lower end into the upper end of the tapered point and terminating abruptly at its upper end, said terminations of said threads being in a. common plane parallel to but spaced from the fillister head.

5. A lace fastener stud of the type for use on automobile bodies and particularly for securing a thick lace to a sheet metal body portion, said fastener comprising a generally cylindrical stud having a tapered point and a flllister head, said fastener stud having ribs protruding from the shank, commencing from below the upper end of .the taperedpoint andterminating sharply in a plane parallel to said head but spaced therefrom by a distance corresponding to the combined thickness of the compressed lace and the sheet metal body, the lengths of ribs along the shank being uniform in cross section and the lengths thereof along the tapered point, tapering to afford entering points whereby in use the stud is driven thereupon be brought home by a turning operation at the fillister head so that their abrupt ends will pass out of registration with said notches and pass under the sheet metal body portion.

6. A lace fastener stud of the type for use on automobile bodies and particularly for securing a thick lace to a sheet metal both! portion, said fastener comprising a generally cylindrical stud having a conical point and a flllister head, said fastener stud having ribs protruding from the shank, of uniform height and width. and presenting smooth cutting edges, terminating at theirupper ends in a'plane parallel to said head but spaced therefrom by a distance corresponding to the combined thickness of the compressed lace and the sheet metal'body, the length of shank between said head and said threads being relatively smooth, said ribs at their lower ends tapering in height to merge with said conical point near the blunt end of the latter, whereby in use the stud is driven through the'lace and sheet metal fastener by a hammer blow so that the ribs will force corresponding notches into the sheet metal and may thereupon be brought home by a turning operation at the flllister head so that their upper ends will pass out of registration with said notches and pass under the sheet metal body portion.

K. VON

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2912829 *Apr 11, 1955Nov 17, 1959Cobi Walter HComposite piles and joiners therefor
US3645163 *Oct 14, 1969Feb 29, 1972Futuristic Building Products IExpanding nail
US4190171 *Feb 2, 1979Feb 26, 1980Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Closure with compensating threads
US5489179 *Aug 19, 1994Feb 6, 1996Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fastener and building assembly comprising workpiece, substrate, and fastener
US5642974 *Dec 12, 1995Jul 1, 1997Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fastener and building assembly comprising workpiece, substrate, and fastener
US5661938 *Feb 2, 1996Sep 2, 1997Illinois Tool Works Inc.Easy drive concrete fastener system
US5741104 *Jun 5, 1997Apr 21, 1998Illinois Tool Works Inc.Steel fastener having grooved shank
US5749692 *Jun 5, 1997May 12, 1998Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fastener with polymer-coated shank
US5867958 *Jul 25, 1997Feb 9, 1999Illinois Tool Works Inc.Easy drive concrete fastener system
US6805525 *Dec 12, 2000Oct 19, 2004Hkn Associates, LlcDrive pin for fastening to a sheet-metal framing member
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DE10258238A1 *Dec 13, 2002Jul 15, 2004Audi AgSelf-piercing screw for making a joint, with diameter of the upper cylindrical shaft being smaller than the thread outer diameter
DE10258238B4 *Dec 13, 2002Nov 10, 2005Audi AgNagelschraube zur Herstellung einer Fügeverbindung, sowie ein Fügeverfahren unter Verwendung der Nagelschraube und eine Vorrichtung zur Durchführung des Fügeverfahrens
EP0697531A1Aug 16, 1995Feb 21, 1996Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fastener with polymer-coated shank
Classifications
U.S. Classification411/453
International ClassificationF16B15/06
Cooperative ClassificationF16B15/06
European ClassificationF16B15/06