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Publication numberUS2075589 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1937
Filing dateApr 24, 1933
Priority dateApr 24, 1933
Publication numberUS 2075589 A, US 2075589A, US-A-2075589, US2075589 A, US2075589A
InventorsMunz Elmer G
Original AssigneeMunz Elmer G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray head
US 2075589 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 30, 1937.v E. G. MUNZ 2,075,589'

SPRAY HEAD I Filed April 24, '1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 PK- lng ,24 24- l. "Hl 3mm@ .527m er /Zanz March 30, '1937. I j E. G. MuNz SPRAY -HEAD Filed April 24, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2v Patented' Msn 3o, 1937 2,075,589 `A UNl'rl-,zuf STATES Ppslltu'lfl ol-l-lca I '2,075,599 SPRAY HEAD Elmer G. Mu Detroit,-Mich. Application April 24, 193s, serial No. 667,693 24 claims. (cl. 299-60) This invention relates generally to irrigatin'gy variations. 1n other words, spray heads conapparatus and refers more particularly to spraystructed in accordance with this invention are ing equipment, f. interchangeable and need not be specially built to Although the present invention may be advansuit the existing conditions at each installation.

tageously employed to improve the irrigating A Still further object of this invention is at- 5 characteristics of the well known portable typeI tributed to the extremely simple manner in which of sprinkler, nevertheless, it ilnds particular utila spray head constructed in accordance with this ity when used ln association with sprinkling sysinvention may be fashioned to provide either a tems embodying a group of spray heads either of full eil'ele Spray 0r a pelt circle Spray Without the underground pop-up type or the stationary the necessity 0f prOViding additional parts 0r in- 10 design to be more fully hereinafter set forth. terehanging any of the parts thereof.

The advantages of the group systems overthe In additiOl'i t0 the fOl'egOiIig. the present inportable type of sprinkler are indisputable, but vention contemplates obtaining all of the objects the commercial application of the group system, previously set forth as well as other objects with l5 especially for residential use, has sometimes been a spray head capable o'f being economically man- 15 impractical due to the inability of the spray heads ufatured, assembled and installed. heretofore produced to operate elciently on the The other features of this invention not sperlatively low water pressures available at the ciflcally set forth above will become apparent as present time ln many localities. In the past, lt this description proceeds, especiallywhen considhas sometimes been necessary to provide booster ered in connection With the accompanying draW- 20 pumps or other devices for supplementing the lngs. wherein:

available water pressure ln localities where the Figure 1 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional pressure is relatively low before a sprinkling sysview through a spray head c0nstructed in acteln could be installed with any degree or emcordance with this invention:

5 cincy. Such practice has proven objectionable Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 25 not only because the high cost of installation pro- 2-2 0f Figure 1 showing the SerratiOnS therein hibited its use in the majority of cases, but also through which the-water is discharged; because the results secured yfrom these installa- Figure 2a is a perspective view, partly in see-i tions were none too satisfactory. tion, featuring a device for issuing a partial spray:

It is, therefore, one or the principal objects of Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure l showing 30 this invention to overcome the foregoing objec- -a slightly modied form of construction; tion or, in other words, to render commercially Figure 4 is e150 e View Similar t0 Figure 1 practical the installation of sprinkling systems in showinga different form 0f spray head construclocalities having relatively low available water tion; 3- pressures without the necessity of supplementing Figure 4a is a View similar to Figure 1 showing 35 these pressures by booster pumps or equivalent another modified construction; devices, and this is accomplished herein by pro- Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 1 showing vidng a small capacity spray head constructed a still further modication of the present invenf i so as to effectively irrigate a relatively great area tion; l 40' with the minimum amount of water pressure. Figure 6 is a plan view of a body portion of a 40 One of the features 'of this invention which con- Spl'ay head illustrating a different 'arrangement tributes materially to the realization of the above of serrations; object resides in constructing the head in such Figure 7 is a sectional view taken on the line a manner that the latter insures uniform irri- 'l-'l 0f Figure 3; gation of the surrounding area by splitting up Figureisalongltudinal sectional view through 4" the water streams issuing from the head to such a sprinkling device showing one way in which the an extent that the area immediately adjacent spray head may be slidably supported within a, the head will be effectively irrigated as well as fitting embedded in the ground; the area remote from the head. Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 8 showing A further feature oi? the present invention the installation of a stationary spray head; 50*

which contributes materially to expediting in- Figure 10 is a sectional view showing the man# stallation as well as reducing the cost of manuner in which' any one of the several embodiments facture to the minimum, resides in the provision of the invention may be employed as a portable of a spray head capable of being used in dieru'nit.

5;, ent localities having a wide range of pressure Referring now more in detail to the several em- 55' bodiments of the invention shown herein for alccomplishing the features set forth in the preamble of this specification and with. special reference to Figure- 1 of the drawings. it will be noted that I have illustrated in the latter figure a small capacity spray head 2U having a body portion 2| fashioned at the lower end for communication with a source of water under pressure and having an inwardly flared portion or dome 22 at the upper l0 end thereof apertured as at 23 to provide for discharging the water from the body 2| of the head. 'I'he discharge of water through the aperture 23 in the head is controlled by a cap 24 having a stud 25 projecting into the body portion 2| and suitably anchored thereto. The lower portion 26 of the cap 24 is circular in cross section and is fashioned to engage an annular frusto-conical seat 21 surrounding the discharge opening 23 in the body. In the present instance, the adjoining bottom and side walls of the cap are arranged at right angles to each other so that a line contact is effected between the cap and seat 21.

'Ihe discharge of water through the opening 23 between the cap and seat 21 is effected herein by forming a plurality of circumferentially spaced passages or serrations 28 in the seat. As shown particularly in Figure 2, the serrations extend substantially radially with respect to the vertical 3 center line oi the body portion across the seat and may be formed in the seat at spaced intervals either entirely or only partially around the seat depending upon whether a full or a part circle spray is desired. In the event a part circle spray is desired, the-serrations are extended only around the -desired portion of the seat, and the remaining effective area thereof will be sealed by the line contact of the cap with the seat as shown in Figure 2a. 4- It will be apparent from the foregoing that the serrations 28 cooperate with the cap 24 to form orifices through which the water in the body 2| is discharged, and owing to the fact that the upper sides of the orices are formed by the line 4 contact of the cap with the seat, the water passing through the orifices instead of owing in a well defined stream in the conventional manner will be broken up to such an extent that the area immediatelysurrounding the head will be irrigated 50 as well asthe area located at some distance from the head. This arrangement is extremely desirable since it provides foruniformly irrigating the area surrounding the head.

In actual practice, it has been found that merely 5 providing a line contact between the cap and seat 21 is not extremely efficient in effecting the desired split-up of the streams emitting from the head when the latter is used in localities having relatively low pressures, and in order to-increase the 60 eiciency of the sprinkler when employed in localities of the above type, I provide means within the body of the head for causing the water to ap7 proach the orifices in a direction at an angle to the axes of the orifices. While any one of a number 65 of different constructions may be resorted to for accomplishing the abovel feature, particularly satisfactory results are secured herein by resorting to the construction shown in Figure 3. It will be noted from the latter figure that the spray head 70 maybe identical in construction to the spray head shown in Figure 1 with the exception that the cap 24' is secured in place upon the seat 21 of the body 2| by threading the stud 25' into a suitable core anchored in the body 2| and having- 75 passages 3| therethrough extending at an angle to the normal flow of water through the body 2| The construction is such that the water flowing from the source of supply must first pass through the inclined ports 3| in the core 30 before it is discharged through the orifices 28". Inasmuch as the passages 3| extend at an angle to the normal ow of the water through the body 2|', the passages effect a whirling action of the water adjacent the seat 21' and causes the water to be discharged into the orifices tangentially or at an angle with respect to the axes of the latter. The abrupt changein direction of the water as it enters the orifices 21' materially 'assists the line contact of the cap with the seat in splitting up the streams emitting from the orifices.

In View of the fact that whirling the water prior to discharging the same through the orifices effects to some extent a split-up of the streams emitting from the orifices, it is not absolutely essential to provide a line contact between the cap of the head and the conical seat on the body thereof. This is especially true in instances where higher pressures are available, and, accordingly, I have shown in Figure 4a a sprinkler 33 differing from the one shown in Figure 3 in that the head 34 is provided with a frusto-conical surface 35 corresponding in inclination to the seat 21" so as to engage the same throughout substantially the entire effective area thereof, The seat 21" has serrations 28"*similar to those shown in Figure l at 28 and in Figure 3 at 28. In this connection, it is to be noted that if desired, serrations may also be formed in the surface 35 to register with the serrations 28" in the seat 21" as shown in Figure 4. g

In Figure 5 of the drawings, I have shown another modified form of sprinkler designated by the reference character 36 having a body portion 31 similar in construction to the body portion 2| set forth in the first described form of the invention with the exception that the portion of the latter surrounding the opening 38 through the upper end thereof instead of having a conical seat formed thereon is fashioned to present an annular knife edge 39 for effecting a line contact with a conical seat 40 formed on the cap 4|. In the present instance, the seatAU is formed with serrations 42 for cooperation with the knife edge 39 to form the orifices through which the water is discharged from the body 31. As in the first described form of the invention, the line contact between the cap 4| and body acts to split the streams of water emitting from the orifices to irrigate the areaimnjiediately adjacent the head as Well as the area spaedpf the latter. The construction shown in Figure 5 may or may not be used in association with a core for effecting a whirling action of the water prior to discharging the same through Athe orifices depending entirely upon the available water pressure. However, I

have shown in the above figure a core 43 identical in construction to the core 3|) in that it forms a mounting for the cap 4| and serves to effect the desired whirling action of the water by means of the inclined passages 44 therethrough.

It should be noted that in the sprinkler head constructions shown in Figures l, 2a, 3, 4, 4a and 5 there are two cooperating members which combine to form the water dischargepassages of the head. One of these members is a seat and the other a cap. In each case, one of the two members has circumferentially spaced serrations therein, and the other member has an annular bearing therewith which serves to close the open side of the serrations forming discharge passages 3 and 5 there is an annular line contact between the seat and Ithe cap, butin Figures 4 and 4a. the l of area. It should also be noted that in each of the constructions the annular contact between the members is of less width than the width of the cooperating member which extends outwardly f furtherest in the direction of discharge. In Figures 1, 3, 4 and 5 the width of the annular contact is less than the length of the serrations, while in Figure 4a the width of the contact is less than" the width of the conical cap member. The projection of the serrated or unserrated cooperating member radially beyond the annular contact between the members is an important feature of my invention, contributing to the breaking up of the streams to irrigate the area between the streams In each of the foregoing embodiments of the invention, reference has only been made to a construction wherein the axes of the serrations in the seat extend radially with respect to the vertical center line of the 'spray head, and while this particular arrangement of serrations is satisfactory when employed' in the manner shown by each of the foregoing modifications to break or split up the streams issuing from thev serrations, nevertheless, when the available water pressure is extremely low, it may be desirable to eccentuate the action of the various means previously set forth in connection with the foregoing modifications to split up the 'streams issuing from the changing the angle of inclination tionsiwith respect to the direction' of water flow in the spray head prior to entering the serrations. Serrations formed in accordance with the above are shown in yFigure 6 by the reference character 45, and as will be observed from this figure, the axes of the serrations 45, instead of extending radially across the seat as in the construction shown in Figure 2, are inclined with respect to radial lines passing through the vertical axis of the spray head. Inclining the serrations in the manner set forth in Figure 6 relative to the direction of flow of the water in the spray head prior to entering the serrations obviously effects a change in direction of the water as it is discharged through the serrations. The extent the dlrectionof flow of the water is changed by the serrations depends upon the angle of inclination of the serrations relative to the flow of the water in the spray head prior to entering the serrations, andinasmuch as the turbulence naturally 'increases as the change in direction of flow increases, it necessarily follows that inclining the serrations assists in splitting up the streams is- ;,65 suing therefrom. It `will also be apparent. from "the above that different effects may be secured by changing the angles of inclination of the serrations with respect to the dow of water inthe to entering the serrations so` spray head prior in pressure or velocity of the ater supply in different localities may d for by merely changing the angle f the serrations to suit the exist- Th above construction elimiity (specially designing spray In Figure 4 both cooperating annular contact has a substantial radial width within the outer boundary of the irrigated area.

spray head. 'I'his is accomplished herein by of the serrav wardly extending ange 9| heads for each locality having differentl water pressures since it permits a standard type of spray head to be readily adapted to a particular installation by merely changing or in effect adjusting the angle of inclination of the serrations. By virtue of this arrangement, the cost of manufacture and installation of spray heads conl structed in accordance with this invention is materially reduced. Attention is called to the fact at this point that practically the same effect can be secured in the modifications shown in Figures 3 to 5, inclusive, by varying the cross sectional larea of the passages through the core member,

but this method of compensating for variations in velocity is not preferred herein since it would not only necessitate interchangeably mounting the cores in the spray head, but would also require the provision of a plurality of different types of' cores. l y

In Figure 8 of the drawings, I have shown the manner in which any one of the above described forms of spray heads may be employed in association with an underground irrigating system wherein it is desirable to elevate the head above the ground by the action `of the water. In detail, there is shown in l'.iiigure 8 a conduit 11 adapted to be embedded within the ground and havingthe lower end fashioned for attachment to a supply pipe (not shown). The upper end of the conduit 11 is open for receiving the body portionl 18 of a suitable spray head. and the latter is Aslidably supported within the conduit by means v of a vertically extending groove 19 formed in the inner wall of the conduit for engaging a projection 88 extending laterally outwardly from the lower end of the body 18 ofthe spray head. The spray head is secured in assembled relation to the body withthe projection in engagement with the groove 19 by means of a cap 8| threadedly mounted upon the upper end of the conduit 11 and having an inwardly extending shoulder 82 for engaging a correspondingly outwardly extending shoulder 83 on the lower end of the spray head body. The conduit 11 is preferably embedded in the ground to such an extent that the upper surface of the cap lies flush withv the top surface of the ground, and the aforesaid upper surface of the cap is recessed as at 84 for receiving the cap member 85 on the spray head in such ing surface of the cap member 8| when the spray head is in 'its lowermost position in the conduit.

' The construction is such that as soon as water under pressure is discharged into the conduit, the same will act upon the spray head to move the same from a position within the conduit to the p'osition thereof shown in Figure 8 wherein the discharge orifices in the spray head are' located an ample distance above the ground for effective operation.

In Figure 9, I have shown a spray head constructed in accordance with any one of the above modifications as used in association with -a stationary irrigating system. When it is desired to `use any one of the above spray heads as an `integral part of a stationary irrigating system, a suitable fitting is secured to the upper ends ofthe spray heads in any convenient manner. The fittings 98 are provided with a laterally outand are centrally countersunk as at 92 for exposing the caps of the spray heads as well as the discharge orifices thereof. With this construction, the spray heads may be embedded within the ground to such an '70 proximately 30.

extent that the top surface of the flange 9| lies substantially flush with the corresponding surface of the ground. When the sprayheadsareinstalled in this manner, the cap portions thereof are usually provided with a screw driver slot` 93 so as -to permit the caps to be readily removed for cleaning purposes.

The foregoing types of spray heads may also be employed with equal facility in association 10 w-ith a portable system and for accomplishing this parent that my invention may be embodied in various modifications. In all of these devices, however, there are certain underlying principles which have been combined forthe first time in sprinkler apparatus.

In order to illustrate more specifically certain preferred apparatus coming within the purview of my invention, I will refer again to the construction shown in Figures 1, 2 and 6 which represent a very desirable commercial form of the invention. lFor lawn sprinkling systems it is usual to employ heads having a certain predeterpable of discharging one gallon of water per minute.l As a practical illustration of such a head it will be assumed that the -dome 22 is arranged at an angle of 45 and that the core 30 has formed therein three inclined ports 3| equally spaced around the circumference. These ports, as shown in Figure 7 are obtained by milling notches 3| one-eighth inch wide and three thirtyseconds inch deep, the cutter being insertedtangentially of the disk. 'I'he serrations 28 extend radially and are so proportioned in number and in size so that under a head of thirty-five pounds pressure in the nozzle, the amount of water discharged per minute will be one gallon. In one 50 practical commercial head the number of serrations is twenty. It is to be understood that the figures given above are only by way of example in order to illustrate the relationship of the several variable factors which affect 'the distribution of the water. When the no`zzle head described is operated at thirty-five pounds pressure, it has been found that a very satisfactory distribution is obtained, irrigating very uniformly a considerable area. G0 If the available water pressure insteadof being thirty-five pounds is considerably less, say for example only fifteen pounds, a satisfactory distribution can not be obtained with the proportions given above, but the head may easily be adapted G5 for the reduced pressure by only a slight modication in the construction of the serrations. Instead of having the `serrations extending radially,

, they are inclined vin theopposite direction from the whirling water in the head at an angle of ap- It has been found that this change in angle fully compensates for the reduction in pressure. On the other hand, if the available pressure is higher than thirty-five pounds, say sixty pounds, it has been found desirable to incline the serrations in the same direction as ythe mined capacity such, for example, as a head caangle predetermined in locity of the water said serrations extending sub whirling water at an angle of 30 with a radial line. For pressures intermediate fifteen and sixty pounds the serrations may be arranged. at intermediate angles, it being understood that a cerhead with radial serrations may be used at sixty pounds pressure by increasing the size of the openings 3| in the core until the `velocity of the whirling water in the head is substantially the same as in the head of the portions iirst described. The effects of variable pressure may also be compensated for by modification of other factors, such as by changing the angle of the dome 22. By making this angle steeper, less whirl is obtained and vby making the angle flatter, more whirl is obtained. The proportions and figures given above are by way of illustration only.

It is to be noted that while in some of the broader aspects of the invention, the means for whirling the water may be eliminated, yet most of the modications described employ this means in combination with a plurality of confined orifices arranged circumferentially of the whirling means and also arranged in a nonrotatable casing. This particular combination of elements is particularly effective in causing proper distribution of the water with a very simple mechanical construction adapted for economical commercial manufacture.

What I claimas my invention is:

1. A spray head having `a body portion communicating at the lower end with a source of water under pressure and having an opening through the upper end surrounded by a conical seat formed with circumferentially spaced serrations across thc same extending substantially to the point where the water leaves the spray head, means cooperating with the serrations to form .orifices including a cap for said opening having a substantially line contact with said seat to break up the streams of water as they issue from the orifices, and means located within the body betweenk the orices and source of water under pressure to impart a whirling motion to the water prior to the latter entering the orifices.

2. A spray head having a body portion communicating at the lower end with a source of water under pressure and having an opening through the upper end thereof, means'located within the body between the aforesaid ends for imparting a whirling motion to the water, a con-v ical seat surrounding the end of the body formed vinclined with respect to A the water'prior to entering the serrations atg'an accordance with theveopening in the upper with serrations therein the direction of flow fof'.y

stantially to the point where the water ,leaves the spray head, and a cap for said opening cooperating with the serrations to form orifices.

3. A spray head having a body portion communicating at the lower end with a source. of water under pressure and having an opening through the upper end thereof, means ,located within the body between the aforesaid ends for imparting a whirling motion to the water, a conical seat surrounding the opening in the upper -end of the body formed with serrations therein inclined with respect to the direction of flow of the water priorto entering the serrations at an angle predetermined in accordance with the velocity of the water said serrations extending substantlally to the point where the water leaves the spray head, and means cooperating with the serrations to form orifices comprising a cap member for the opening having a substantially line contact with the conical seat to insure breaking up the streams of water as they issue vfrom the orifices.

4. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like comprising a. body, means for whirling the water in ysaid body, said body being provided with a series of circumferentially spaced laterally extending grooves for projecting the water in a series of streams and said body also being provided with an annular edge having a substantially. line contact with the grooved portion of said body, to the point where the water leaves the spray head. n 5. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like comprising a body, means for whirling the water in said body, said body being provided' with a series of circumferentially spaced laterally extending grooves extending substantially Yto the point where" the water leaves the spray head for projecting the water in a series of streams, said grooves being inclined at an angle with respect C to the direction of whirl and said body being provided with an annular edge having a substantially line contact with the grooved portion of said body.

6. A sprinkling device comprising a stationaryy i. casing communicating with a source of water 40 under pressure, a nozzle head longitudinally slidable in said casing, means within said nozzle head for whirling the water, said nozzle head being provided with a series sof circumferentially spaced laterally extending grooves extending substan-A tially to the point where the water leaves the noz-4 zle head for projecting the water in a series of streams, said grooves being inclined at an angle with respect to the direction of whirl and said body being provided with an annular edge having a substantially line contact with the grooved portion of said body.

7. A sprinkling device comprising a body, means for whirling the water in said body, said body being provided with a series of circumferen- I tially spaced grooves extending laterally from the axis of the whirl, a screw extending axially within said body and having a disk-shaped head engaging said grooves, a flange extending outwardly from said body having a portion extending upwardly beyond the head of said screw and having a recess providing clearance for the .water projected from said grooves.

8. A spray head for lawn sprinkling 'systems and the like comprising a body having an outwardly flaring conicalseat, an annular cap'secured to said body having one edge thereof engaging said seat in line contact only, said seat being provided with a series of circumferentially spaced open-sided grooves.

9. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and thelike comprising a body having an outwardly flaring conical seat, means for whirling the water within the spray head around the axis of said conical seat, said seat having a series of 75 circumferentially spaced open-sided grooves said grooves extending substantially formed therein and an annular cap secured to said body having one edge thereof engaging said seat in a circular line contact.

10. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like comprising a body having an out-` 5 wardly flaring conical seat, one segmental portion of said seat being provided with a series of circumferentially spaced grooves and another portion being ungrooved and an annular cap secured to said body having one edge thereof engaging said seat in a circular line contact only thereby forming a seal with the ungrooved portion of said seat and forming means for breaking upvthe streams projected from said grooves.

11. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like comprising a body having an outwardly flaring conical seat, means for whirling water within said spray head around the axis of said seat, said seat being provided with a series of circumferentially spacedl laterally extending grooves extending where the water leaves the spray head for projecting the water in a series of separate streams, said grooves being inclined inthe opposite direction from the direction of whirl to break up saidv streams and an annular cap having one edge thereof engaging said seat in a circular line contact.

12. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like comprising a bodyhaving a series of circumferentially spaced serrations for projecting the water, said body, having an annular inner surface, a stationary core within said body having its outer surface seating in said annular inner surface forming'a chamber between said core and said serrations, said core having inclined grooves in saidv outer surface for supplying whirling water to said chamber.

13. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems and the like adapted to obtain uniform distribution with a predetermined water pressure comprising a body, means for whirling the water in said body and means extending substantially to the` point where the water leaves the spray head for forming the water into a series of separate streams inclined with respect to the direction of whirl in accordance 'with said predetermined pressure, said vinclination ranging from an angle of 30 in the opposite direction to the whirl in the case of extremely low pressures to an angle of 30 y in the same direction as the whirl in the case of high pressures.

14..The method uniform distribution with a `predetermined water pressure supply which comprises internally whirling the water and discharging the water in a series of streams substantially at the point where the water leaves the spray head and inclining said streams with respect to the direction of whirl in accordance with said predetermined pressure, said inclination ranging from an angle of 30 in the opposite direction to the whirl in the case of extremely low pressures to an angle of 36 in the same direction as the whirl .in the case ofhigh pressures.

15. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems comprising a body having a seat, a cap securedt said body having annular contact with the seat,

16. A spray head for lawn sprinkling systems comprising a body having a seat provided with circumferentially spaced grooves, a cap having substantially to the point of lawn sprinkling to obtain I annular contact with said. seat, but leaving a portion of each groove open sided.

17. A spray head comprising a body and a cap, said body being provided with circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves, the body and cap having annular contact across said grooves less in width than the length of the grooves.

18. A spray head comprising a body member with a seat, and a conical cap member wider than said seat, said body member being provided with circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves, the other forming with the grooves a series of orices.

19. A spray head having a member fashioned to-receive iiuid under pressure and having an opening through the upper end thereof, a cap member for said opening, means providing for the discharge of fluid through the opening including a conical seat on one of the members formed with a plurality of circumferentially spaced serrations across the same, said serrations extending substantially to the point where the water leaves the spray head, and an annular edge on the other of said members having annular contact narrower than the width of the seat tov form with the serrations a plurality of orifices arranged to discharge unobstructed streams.

20. A lawn sprinkler head comprising a body and a cap, one of which is provided with circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves, the body and cap having annular line contact across said grooves. v

21. A lawn sprinkler head comprising a body member with a seat, and a conical cap member wider than saidseat, one of said members being provided with -ircumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves, the other forming with the grooves a series of orifices, said cap and seat having substantially annular line contact.

2.2. A law-n sprinkler head comprising a body having an outwardlyiiaring seat, an annular cap secured to said body and engaging said seat in annular line contact only, one of said Vmembers being provided with circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves and the other forming with the grooves a series of oriiices.

23. In a lawn sprinkling system, an upwardly directed spray head comprising two contacting members, one of which has a series of circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves extending at an angle not substantially greater than to the horizontal, one of said contacting members extending beyond its contact with the other while remaining in contact with the streams from said grooves whereby the water is distributed over the area Within the range of said streams.

24. In a lawn sprinkling system, an upwardly directed spray head comprising two contacting members, one of which has a single series of circumferentially spaced conically diverging grooves extending at an angle not substantially greater than 45 to the horizontal, substantially all of said grooves extending at the same inclination, and substantially all of the water being discharged through said single series of grooves, one of said contacting members extending beyond its contact with the other while remaining in contact with the streams from said grooves whereby the water is distributed over the area within the range of said streams.

ELMER G. MU'NZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US8925837Nov 23, 2010Jan 6, 2015Rain Bird CorporationSprinkler with variable arc and flow rate and method
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/11, 239/204, 239/497, 239/476, 239/460
International ClassificationB05B1/26, B05B1/34, B05B1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/3447, B05B1/14, B05B1/265
European ClassificationB05B1/34A3B4F, B05B1/26A1, B05B1/14