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Publication numberUS2075676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1937
Filing dateJun 26, 1936
Priority dateJun 26, 1936
Publication numberUS 2075676 A, US 2075676A, US-A-2075676, US2075676 A, US2075676A
InventorsToney Edward F
Original AssigneePittsburgh Plate Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Store front construction
US 2075676 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 30, 1937. E F, TONEY 2,075,676

AsToRL FRONT coNsTRUcTloN u Filed June 26,. 1936 2 sheets-sheet 1 1S //v VEN To@ 21 March 30, 1,937. E. F. ToNEY STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 26, 1936 Z/Gbn/ @NEW/1.5"-

Patented Mar. 30, 1937 PATENT OFFICE STORE FRONT CONSTRUCTION Edward F. Toney, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Allegheny County, Pa., a corporation' of Pennsylvania Applicationy June 26,

3 Claims.

The invention relates to store front construction and particularly to the ornamental metal sheathing which is usedv over the area of the store iront above or below or intermediate the vsndows. It has for its objects the provision of an improved joint construction at the meeting ends of the sheathing plates, which provides for the expansion of the plates due to temperature changes, which is easily applied, which avoids the requirement for exposedscrew heads which would impair the appearance of the sheathing; and which permits a reduction in the number of screws ordinarily required. One embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings,

l wherein:

Figure 1 is a face view of the structure. Fig. 2 is an enlarged section on the line II-II of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but with the cap plates removed. And Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are isometric detail views of the cap plate sections.

Referring to the drawings, 1 is the supporting structure of wood or the like which is to be covered by the sheathing. The sheathing in this instance consists of three sets of strips or plates 8, 9, I0 and II, I2, I3, which are secured to the structure 1 with their ends separated to provide the space I 4. The sheathing strips may be of considerable length and the space I4 is necessary in order to provide for changes in length due t0 expansion. The sheathing strips may be of any suitable metal, such as aluminum or brass and are preferably formed by extrusion. These may be of any desired ornamental configuration and the cap plates later described are similarly ornamented in order to improve the general appearance.

Lying above the space I4 are a series of cap plates I5, I6 and I1 of the same material as the sheathing plates, but preferably formed by casting. These plates overlap each other at their end edges as shown in Fig. 2, and at their "side edges they lie above the faces of the sheathing plates, as indicated in Fig. l. The top and bottom cap plates are provided with flanges I8 and I9 lying at right angles to the face of the structure I and extending over the end edges thereof, such flanges being secured to the structure 1 by means of the screws 20 and 2I. By this means, the heads of the screws are concealed from an observer at the front of the sheathing.

The cap plates are provided adjacent their ends with the projections 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 21, which lie in the space I4 when the structure is assembled, as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2. These projections are of less Width than the slot I4 so 1936, Serial No. 87,471

that they leave clearance for the approach of the ends of the sheathing sections under varying temperature conditions. They are of such depthl that they lie against the wood structure 'I when the structure is assembled (Fig. 2). 'Ifhe projec- 5 tions 22 and 24 are provided with screw holes to receive the screws 25 and 26 by means of which the plates are anchored in position. The projections 22 and 25 are provided with a dovetail interlock so that when the parts are in assembled relation, the lower end of the plate I6 is held against outward movement, the screw 25 thus serving to hold the meeting ends of both of the plates. Since the plate I6 overlaps the plate I5, the head of the screw 25 is concealed so that from the front of the structure, there is no showing of the fastening devices. There is a similar interlock between the upper end of the plate I6 and the lower end of the plate I1, such interlock being provided by the projections 24 and 21. It will be noted that the invention is shown as applied to a structure in which the cap consists of three pieces only, but it will be understood that the same system of interlocking the plates and securing them in position applies regardless of the number of parts which are required to make up the cap.

In assembling the cap over the slot I4, the plate I5 is rst applied and secured in position by the screws 2| and 25. The plate I6 is then applied with the lugs 22 and 25 in interlocking engage- 30 ment and the screw 26 is positioned. Finally the plate II is applied and its flanged end I8 is secured in place by the screw 20, thus completing the assembly. The construction has the advantage of ease of installation due to the small num- .3, ber of screws required because of the interlocking devices, and further presents an improved appearance as compared to cap plates in which the heads of the screws are visible. 'I'he ends of the sheathing plates are held securely by the cap 40 plates and are free to expand and contract under temperature changes. Other advantages incident to the construction will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

What I claim is:

1. In combination in sheathing for a flat supporting structure, alined sheathing plates secured to the structure with a space between their adjacent ends, a series of cap plates over said space which successively overlap one another at their ends and whose sides overlap the outer faces of the sheathing plates, projections on the under sides of the cap plates at the ends thereof lying in said space but out of contact with the ends of the sheathing plates, an interlock between said projections at the overlapping ends of the cap plates arranged so that the plate which lies on the outer side of the overlap is prevented from` outward movement, and a screw extending through the projection on the plate on the inner side of the overlap and into said supporting structure.

2. In combination in sheathing for a flat supporting structure, alined sheathing plates secured to the structure with a space between their adjacent ends, a series of cap` plates over said space which successively overlap one another at their ends and whose sides overlap the outer faces of the sheathing plates, projections on the under sides of the cap plates at the ends thereof lying in said space, but out of contact with the ends of the sheathing plates, a dovetail interlock between said projections at the overlapping ends of the cap plates arranged so that the "plate which lies on the outer side of the overlap is prevented 20 from outward movement, and a screw extending through the projection on the plate on the inner side of the overlap and into said supporting structure.

3. In combination in sheathing for a flat supporting structure, alined sheathing plates secured to the structure with a space between their adjacent ends, a series of cap plates over said space which successively overlap one another at their ends and whose sides overlap the outer faces of the sheathing plates, projections on the under sides of the cap plates at the ends thereof lying in said space but out of contact with the ends of the sheathing plates, an interlock between said projections at the overlapping ends of the. cap plates arranged so that the plate which lies on the outer side of the overlap is prevented from outward movement, and a screw extending through the projection on the plate on the inner side of the overlap and into said supporting structure, the end members of said series of cap plates having flanges at their outer ends extending at right angles to the face of said supporting structure and adapted to overlap the edges of such structure and to be secured thereto.

EDWARD F. TONEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3404495 *Jul 8, 1966Oct 8, 1968Reynolds Metals CoCombined flashing and fascia system and method of making same
US4104841 *Jul 7, 1977Aug 8, 1978Paul NazRoofing or siding slat assembly with protective hinge-forming groove
US4266382 *May 18, 1979May 12, 1981Champion International CorporationHardboard panel siding
US4969302 *Jan 15, 1985Nov 13, 1990Abitibi-Price CorporationSiding panels
US5315799 *Dec 8, 1992May 31, 1994Cullinan James EMutli-panel molding assembly for a building
US5729947 *Oct 24, 1994Mar 24, 1998Dawes; Michael GrahamCovering
US7222465Dec 22, 2004May 29, 2007Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Building board
US7694477 *Jan 3, 2007Apr 13, 2010Peter KuelkerHangerless precast cladding panel system
US8006452 *Sep 10, 2008Aug 30, 2011Isolpack S.P.A.Insulating panel for buildings, provided with an auxiliary unit, in particular a photovoltaic unit, and with improved means for supporting and holding the auxiliary unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/466, 52/518, 52/96, 52/316, 52/459, 52/543, 52/551
International ClassificationE06B1/04, E06B1/38
Cooperative ClassificationE06B1/38
European ClassificationE06B1/38