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Publication numberUS2075982 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1937
Filing dateSep 6, 1933
Priority dateSep 6, 1933
Publication numberUS 2075982 A, US 2075982A, US-A-2075982, US2075982 A, US2075982A
InventorsGeorge Harry S
Original AssigneeUnion Carbide & Carbon Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for heat treating rails
US 2075982 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1937. H. s. GEORGE METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR HEAT TREATING RAILS 5 Sheets-Sheetl 1 Filed Sept. 6, 1933 April 6, 1937. H. s. GEQRGE METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR HEAT TREATING RAILS 5 sheets-Sheet 2 v Filed Sept. 6, 1953 ATTORNEY April 6, 1937. H. s. GEORGE METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR HEAT TREATING RAILS Filed Sept. 6, 1933 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEY April 6, 1937. H. s. GEORGE 2,075,982

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR HEAT TREATING RAILS Filed Sept. 6, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 April 6, 1937. H, s, GEORGE 2,075,982

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR HEAT TREATING RAILS F'iledSept. 6, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR H460 5 G20/Paf' BY v ATTORNEY Patented. Apr. 6, -1937 PATENT oFFlcls'.l

METHOD F AND APPARATUS FOB, HEAT .TREATING RAILS Harry S..George, Massapequa, N.' Y., assignor, by

mesne assignments,

to', Union Carbide and f Carbon Corporation, a corporation of New York Application September` 6, 1933, Serial No. 688,335

19 claims'.

ned to tracks but it has also assumed importance in switch-points, frogs, and crossingsf This is particularly true at the ends of rails where rolling trafhc passes over a rail joint. The tread surfaces 'at the ends of rails at joints in track become battered to a lower level than other portions of the tread surfaces of rails, because at the ends of rails there is no support against end flow of rail metal at the tread surfaces. thereof; hence,Y

the rate at which tread surfaces of rails-- become battered is greatest at rail ends. This lowering of the running or tread surfaces of rails at railv joints increases the effect of the pressure of rolling traic by converting it into a downward blow as the wheels pass over rail joints. This action stillfurther increases the rate at which the tread surfaces at the ends of rails become battered over that of the rest of the rails. For this reason rails. particularly lthe ends thereof, are heattreate'd or hardened to retard the rate of batter and prolong their life so as to reduce operating costs in track maintenance.

Heretofore, the only methods of heat treatment which have proved practicable employ an lexternal `quenching medium, such as Water or an air blast. In most cases the treatment has included a tempering operation. Although it is possible to attain the desired results with such methods when great care is employed, the methods are very diflicult because of vthe necessity of guarding against cracks, or the setting up of internal stresses which', when combined with repeated stresses from service, often result in the eventual cracking of the corners o'f tread surfaces at the ends of rails. lThis is especially true when a secondary tempering operation is employed, because of the extra hazard entailed in the drastic application of heat to steel in a hardened state.

It has also generally been thepractice to harden tread surfaces of rails, especially at their ends, by heat treating a rectangular area. Thispractice is objectionable, because of the abrupt transition betweenv the hardened heat treated tread surface area and unhardened tread surface area adjacent thereto.

In order to facilitate an understanding of this invention in which an improved method and apparatus for carrying out the same are provided (Cl. 14S-21.5)

for heattreating the tread surfaces of rails, it seems expedient at-the `outset to consider the manner in which rolling trafc tendsl to cause deformation of rail tread surfaces. As the wheels of rolling stock move over a track, the tires of the wheels bear on a strip of tread extending from about the middle of the rail head toward the outside edge 'thereof but not reaching the outside edge. After months of service this strip tends to broaden toward the inside edge of the rail head, finally reaching it as the rail wears down and the contour of the rail head takes on the 'shape of the tire; This is especially true where rails are substantially vertical or canted not more than l in 40. Thee-above is also true to a lesser extent where rails are canted as much as 1 in 20, and in such cases in straight track a longer time is. required for tires to bear on the inside edges of the tread surfaces. -From the abovefconsiderations, I have found that the objections of having the transition zones .extending at right angles to the lengths of rails, as obtained by prior heat treating practices, can be avoided by terminating the heat treated tread surface areas approximately diagonally across rail heads. This diagonal boundary-at a transition zone preferbly is produced so that the area heat treated is longest at the edge of the-rail head where the tendency of ,the rail metal to wear and ow greatest. Thus, in straight track`where' th or only slightly canted, the diagonal boundary is produced so that the heat treated area extends a longer distance along the inner edge than the outer edge of a rail head. Conversely, where rails are canted a .considerable amount and where rails are sub. tantially vertical track maintenance is such that the greatest wear occurs from the middle to the outside edges of rail heads, the diagonal boundary is produced so that the heat treated area extends a longer distance along the outer edge than the inner edge of a `rail head. An object of my invention, therefore, is to heat treat tread surface areas at the ends of rails so that the length of a heat treated area longitudinally of a rail/is longest at the edge of the rail head where the tendency of the rail metal to Wear and iiow is greatest.

Another object of my invention is to heat treat tread surface areas at the ends of rails in. such a manner that rolling traflic will not pass abruptly from a hardened to an unhardened portion of a tread surface area or vice versa.

A further object of my invention is to .provide ening tread surface areas at the ends of rails with a single application of heat and without employing any external quenching medium.

A further object of my invention is te provide an improved method of heat treating end areas of rail tread surfaces in which a source of hightemperature heat having a substantially constant rate of heat output is applied to the areas for a predetermined length of time.

A further object of'my invention is to provide an improved apparatus which is flexible in operation for effectively carrying out the above objects.,

A further objectof my invention is to provide an improved apparatus, which can be mounted on a Wheeled truck adapted to move on rails, for heat treating tread surface areas on one or both lines of rails in a section of track with the minimum amount of effort and in the least length of time.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved apparatus for heat treating simultaneously the tread surface areas at the ends of abutting railsI at a rail joint.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved apparatus having a longitudinal, vertical, and transverse adjusting means for readily heat treating tread surfaceareas in accordance Withthe principles of this invention.

The above and further objects and novel features of my invention will become apparent in the following description and drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of apparatus embodying my invention disposed over thevabutting ends of a pair of rails for heat treating areas on the tread surfaces thereof, the apparatus being mounted on a wheeled truck arranged to carry gas cylinders.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus and truck shown in Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged side elevational view, partly in section, of part of the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional `view taken on line 4--4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a plan view, partly in section, of the apparatus shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is an end view taken on line 6 6 of Fig. 3; A

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 'l-l of Fig. 3 with the blowpipes disposed above the tread surface of the rail to be heat treated; and

Fig. 8 is a plan view of a rail joint diagrammatically showing trapezoidal-shaped heat treated areas on the tread surfaces; of abutting rails.

Referring toFig. 8 of the drawings, I have illustrated one application cf the principles of my invention in which trapezoidal-shaped hardened tread surface areas 20 are produced at the ends of abutting rails 2l which form a joint in .a straight track wheretrack maintenance is such that the tendency of the rail metal to Wear and ow is greater on the inside edges 22 than at the outside edges 24 of the rail heads. In this instance the trapezoidal-shaped heat treated areas are preferably produced so that the inner edges 22 of the rail heads are heat treated a longer distance longitudinally of the rails than the outer edges 24 thereof. In some cases these hardened Ytread surface areas are substantially of triangular shape, but in Fig. 8 they are shown asrbeing of trapezoidal shape, as distinguished from the usual hardened tread surface areas of rectangular shape. Rails having hardened areas of this general character form the subject matter of copending application Serial No. 688,334.

By terminating the heat treated tread surface areas 20 approximately diagonally, as indicated by the dotted lines 25, the transition zones between the hardened areas 20 and unhardened areas 26a adjacent thereto extend a considerable distance along the longitudinal direction of the ,heads of the rails 2|. In this manner the vrolling traffic will not pass abruptly from a heat treated tread surface area to an untreated area or vice versa.

. It is desirable, at least for economic reasons, to heat'treat a minimum area of the tread surfaces at the -end of rails. I have found that a trapezoidal or triangular or similar shaped heat treated area is particularly desirable because, for a given and sufficient depth of heat treatment in the tread surface of a rail, it is the smallest area which will give sufficient length longitudinally of the rail in such a manner that the tread surface areas are effectively utilized to prevent wearing and flowing of the rail metal.

Although hardened tread surface areas may be produced in many different ways, the trapezoidalshaped heat treated area particularly lends itself to my preferred method in which a heat treated tread surface area is allowed to cool naturally without employing any external quenching medium, such as water or an air blast. It is to be understood that the expression natural cooling signifies the combined cooling eifect of convection and radiation of heat from the rail to the surrounding air plus the cooling effect of the underlying and adjacent mass of rail which is relatively cool. I have'found that the latter eifect is much greater than thecooling effect of air where a relatively small tread surface area of an ordinary rail is heated.

In'order, to produce a substantially uniform and satisfactory condition of hardness of tread surface areas with naturalcooling, it is desirable to control both the temperature to which a tread surface area is heated and the depth of penetration-of heat. 'Ihis can be accomplished by ernploying a source of high temperature heat having a substantially constant rate of heat output, and by applying such source of heat to 'tread surface areas for a predetermined length of time. This insures the heating of tread surface areas to an elevated temperature before too much heat has penetrated into the mass of the rail, and also avoids the use of a source of heat of such intensity that only a supercial or skin hardening is effected. The elevated temperature is sufliciently high so that, when the heated tread surface metal cools rapidly, it will acquire a high degree of hardness; and throughout the specification and claims this elevated temperature is termed an elevated hardening temperature.

In accordance with the principles of this invention, I provide anfimproved apparatus H for uniformly heat treating areas of tread surfaces of rails, as described above, in the minimum length of time. In this embodiment of my invention gas ames are employed as the source of high temperature heat, but it is to be understood that other sources of high temperature heat may be employed. The apparatus H is mounted on a suitable support, and I prefer to mount the same on the end of a wheeled truck T which may be moved along the rails by manual force, by attaching a motor car thereto, or by providing suitable self-propelling means.

The truck T includes wheels 21 secured in the usual manner to a pair of spaced axles 28, and journal boxes 29 for supporting a frame 30 of the truck on the axles 26. A iioor 3| is mounted an spaced transverse members- 32 which are secured in any suitable manner to the frame. 30.

The braking mechanism for stopping the truck T comprises brake shoes 32 pivotally secured at 33 to the frame 30. The brake shoes are pivotally attached to the lower ends of members- 34, the

upper ends of which are pivotally attached to a link 35. `Thelink 35 is pivotally connected to one arm of a bell crank 36 which is secured to a bracket 31 extending downward from the floor 3|. The other arm of the bell crank 36 is pivotally connected to one end of a member .38, the opposite end of which is connected to a brake arm 39 pivotally secured to an arcuate shaped member 40 mounted on the frame 30 and floor 3|. The arm 39 is provided with a control rod 39' having a pawl at the lower 'end thereof which is adapted to engage with thenotched teeth on the member 40 to maintain the brake shoes 32 in or out of ,a braking position.

Gas cylinders are carried on the truck T for supplying gas tb the blowpipes B. The gas employed is preferably a mixture of acetylene and oxygen supplied by acetylene cylinders A and oxygen cylinders O. The acetylene cylinders A are arranged in a vertical position at each end of the iloor 3|, and longitudinal movement thereof is prevented by transverse members 42 which extend behind the cylinders A and. are attached at their` ends to vertical members 4| fixed to each corner of the floor 3|. Side brackets43` secured to the oor 3| and vertical members 4|, respectively., prevent lateral movement of the acetylene cylinders. 4

The oxygen cylinders O are arranged crosswise on the floor 3| in the space between the two banks of acetylene cylinders A at each end of the truck T. For conveniently supplyingroxygen to both apparatus H mounted at the front end ofthe truck T and above the tread surfaces of the two vlines of rails, one-half of the cylinders O are arranged to face one side of the truck T, and the other half of the cylinders O are arranged to face the opposite side'of the truck, as shown in Figs..1'and 2.

-The mixture of oxygen and acetylene gases may be supplied to the blowpipes B in any suit-- able manner, rand as shown the banks of acetylene cylinders A at each end of the truck T are connected through coiled conduits 44 to manifolds 45 which are arranged transversely of the truck T at each end thereof and clamped at`j their ends at 46 to the upper ends of vertical members 4|. Manifolding each bank of acetylene cylinders A in this manner insures an adequate supply of acetylene gas for the heat treating apparatus H. The flow of acetylene gas from each cylinder A is controlled by a valve 41 connected between the manifold 45 and each conduit 44.

In order to maintain the acetylene gas at a substantially constant pressure, the gas is delivered from the manifolds 45 to pressure regulating valves 48. As shown in Figs. l and 2, the manifold 45 at the forward end of the truck T is connected directly to its pressure regulating valve 48, and the manifold 45 at the rear end of the truck T is connected t'o one side of a regulator 45', the opposite side of which is connected by a conduit 49 to the forward end of the truck where it is connected to the other pressure regulating valve 48. The regulator 45' is provided at the connection of the conduit 49 to the manifold 45 so that the conduit 49 will not be subjected to the full acetylene pressure in the mani- Iene and oxygen gas without disturbing the valve adjustments on the blowpipes B after they have once been made, cut-out valves 52 are provided. These cut-out valves 52 are connected to the outlets of thev acetylene and oxygen pressure regio-- lating valves 48 and 5|, and have a 4single lever 53 extending through an opening 54 for simulvtaneously .controlling the flow of oxygen and acetylene gas to each apparatus H` The cut-out vvalves 52 and pressure regulating valves 46 and 5| connected thereto are mounted on brackets 55 which are supported by a transverse member 56 that is secured at its ends tothe vertical members 4| at vthe forward end ofthe truck r1'.

The acetylene gas and oxygen gas are delivered from the cut-out valves 52 through flexible conduits 51 and 56, respectively, to the mixing cham? bers 59 of the blowppes B, and valves having handles 6,0 and 6| are provided for controllinz,r the mixture of oxygen and acetylene gases in each of the chambers 59. As shown more clearly in Fig. 7, the mixture of acetylene and oxygen gas is delivered from the mixing chambers 59 through l conduits 62 and vertical pipes 63 connected thereto to manifold blocks 64 which are connected to the pipes 63 at their lower ends. Each manifold block '64 is provided .with three transversely aligned nozzles or tips for directing the flames v produced at the orices thereof on the tread surfacesof rails 66.

To prevent any backfiring which may occur as a result of pre-ignition of the gases before issuing' A from the orifices of the nozzles 65, suitable means is provided to prevent each individual nozzle from being subjected to the'intense heat produced by all of the ames. Although the nozzles may be maintained cool by employing water jackets or the like through which water is circulated, such anarrangement requiresadditio'nal equipment to be carried by the truck T. I prefer to employ a metallic baille which cooperates with the nozzles and tends to diminish the circulation o f the flames and surrounding heated air about the nozzles, the baille preferably being of a metal or alloy possessing high heat conductivity and capable of dissipating heat suilciently rapidly so that it will not melt. -I have found a ccpperblock of substantial mass suitable for this purpose and'. as shown in Fig. 3, such acopper block 65a may be secured to the underside of a manifold block 64 and depend therefrom in a vertical plane substantially parallel to and between the transversely aligned nozzles 65 when the blocks 64 are abutting each other. Although the block 65a is shown in .a transverse position in Fig. 3 it is to be understood that in other instances it may be desirable to arrange a baiile in a longitudinal position for each block so as to divide the nozzles intok separate groups.

For -igniting the gas at the nozzles 65, pilot burners may be employed. Each pilotl burner may comprise a small nozzle 61 secured to a bracket 68 extending outward from one side of the manifold block 64. The nozzle 61 is bent at 69 so as to direct a llame adjacent the orifices of the nozzles 65, and may be provided with a partially'open valve 10 having a push button 1| for opening the valve further when it is desired to increase the size of the continuously burning pilot 'flame to ignite the gas at the nozzles 65. The nozzle 61 may be supplied with acetylene gas through a .flexible conduit '|21 connected through a valve f|3 to the acetylene conduit 49, as shown inf-Fig. l. Although only a.. single pilot burner is shown, it is to be understood that each blowpipe lBfiriay'be provided with 'a pilot burner in a like manner. The two pointers 14 of each apparatus 'H are arranged adjacent each other, and can be f moved vertically within guide rings 'l5 formed integrally'with a plate 15a which is secured to the side wall of the manifold block 14 opposite the pilot nozzle 61. The pointers have projections 1B which are received in recesses in the upper guide rings 'l5 toY limit further downward movement ofthe pointers 14 when their tips are adjacent the tread surfaces of the rails 68. When the two blowpipes of an apparatus H are contacting each other, their respective pointers 14 form a single pointer for aligning the apparatus at a rail joint or any other point on the tread surface of a rail where it is desired to use both blowpipes B of the apparatus simultaneously. Before a heat treating operation isrstartedthe pointers 'I4 are raised, and are maintained in such a position by the normal friction between the pointers and the guide rings 15 so as to remove the tips of the pointers from the ams at the nozzles 65 of the blowpipes B.

In accordance with this invention, in order to provide trapezoidal, triangular or similar shaped heat-treated areas at the abutting ends of rails, as shown in Fig. 8, the two blowpipes B of each apparatus H are moved longitudinally of the rails 66 from the joint therebetween toward the centers of the respective rails, and simultaneously with such longitudinal movement a transverse movement is imparted to the blowpipes B. In

, this instance the transverse movement is preferably. towards the inside edges of the rail heads so that the length of the area heat treated will be longer on the inside edges than on the outside edges of the rail heads. The blowpipes B are also continuously oscillated transversely of the rail head during the heat treating operation to insure uniform heating without any local over-heating at any point in the area heat treated.

In the present embodiment of my invention the oscillation and longitudinal and transverse movements of the blowpipes B are simultaneously produced by a single drive shaft 'l1 having a handle 78 at one end thereof. As shown in Fig. 3, the drive shaft 11 is journaled at openings '|9 in spaced brackets 80. welded at 8| to the ends of an inverted U-shaped frame 82. Collars 83 are xedly secured to the shaft 'l1 and bear against the outer walls of the brackets 80 to prevent longitudinal movement of the shaft 11. Between the spaced brackets 80, which extend upwardly and to one side of the U-shaped member 82 and above the drive shaft TI, as shown in Fig. 6, the blowpipe carriages C and driving mechanism therefor are pivotally mounted.

Referring to Fig. 5, the pivotally mounted structure for the carriages C comprises two spaced arms 84 arranged adjacent and inside f the spaced brackets 80. The arms 8l! are pivotally connected at one end thereof at 85 to the outer ends of the brackets 80, and the opposite ends of the arms 84 are connected by a longitudinal V-shaped member 86 welded at 81 at each end thereof to the arms 84.

A leadscrew 88 for movingvthe blowpipe carriages C longitudinally of the rails 66 extends withinthe horizontally positioned V-shaped member 86, asshown in Figs. and 7, and the reduced ends 89 and'90 thereof extend through and are journaled in openings 9| and 92 of the pivotally mounted'armsv 84. In order to move the blowpipe carriages C in opposite directions so as 'to heat treat' the tread surfaces of abutting rail ends simultaneously, one-half of the lead screw 88 is provided with' left hand threads, and the other h alf thereof isprovided with right hand threads, as shown in Fig. 3.

Referring to Figs. 5 and 7, the two blowpipe carriages C are actuated by left hand and right hand threaded half-nuts 93 which engage the respectively threaded halves of the lead screw 88. The half nut 93 is welded at 94 to the bottom of a U-shaped guide block 95. The upper wall 96 of the guide block 95 has in its inside face an undercut bearing groove 91 which is adapted to slide along the end 98 of the upwardly extending Wall of the V-shaped member 86. The guide block 95 is maintained in sliding contact with the V-shaped member. 86 by a removable bearing block 99. The block 99 is held in place against the end |00 of the downwardly v Aextending wall of the V-shaped member 86 by a .groove whichslides along the end |00 of the downwardly extending wall of the V-shaped member 86. The mixing chamber 59 0f each blowpipe B is mounted on a bracket |03 which is secured by cap screws |0f5| and |05 to the upper` portion of the guide block 94. l

On the side of the U-shaped guide block95 opposite thehalf nut 93, there is a vertical projection |06 having undercut bearing grooves |01 to receive a vertical blowpipe supporting plate |08, as shown in Fig. 5..

Referring to Fig. '7, the plate |08 is supported and ymovable vertically by -means including a stud |09 which ts into athreaded vertical opening at the top of the plate |08. The upper end of the stud |09 extends through an opening in the projection ||0 of the bracket |03, and is provided with a ange 3 which bears against the'bottom of the projection ||0. Turning a handknob xe'dly secured to the stud |09 by a set screw ||2 raises or lowers the plate |08 as desired. I

Referring to Fig. 5, the guide plate |08 is provided with an opening to receive the reduced end ||4 of a horizontal blowpipe guide tube ||5 that is welded at ||6 to the guide plate |08. A block member having a. central opening I8 is adapted to slide along the guideltube 5, and at one side thereof is provided with a vertical opening I9 through which the vertical pipe 63 of the blowpipe B extends. As shown in Fig. 7, the pipe 63 is welded at |20 to the top of the block member ||1.

Referring again to Fig. 5, each blowpipe B is independently adjustable transversely of the rails 66 by "athreaded stud 2| which extends through a horizontal opening |22 in the block member ||1 and which is received in a threaded opening |23 in a plate |24. The plate |24 fits over the guide tube ||5 and is Welded thereto at |25. Each blowpipe B and its block member ||1 engages both the gears |33 and 35 on the drive can be moved toward or away from `the plate |2/4 by'a handknob |26 securedto the stud |2|, and longitudinal movement of the stud is pre vented by collars |21 xedly secured thereto and bearing against opposite sides of the block member ||1.

It will thus be seen that the blowpipes B are adjustable vertically and transversely of the rails 66 independently of each other; that the blowpipe carriages Care slidable along the V-shaped member 86 and actuated by the lead screw 88;

and that the V-shaped member 86 and leadA screw 88 are mounted and journaledrespective- 1y on the arms 84 which are pivotally connected at 85 to one end of the spaced brackets 80.

During a heat treating operation it is desir-v able to oscillate the blowpipes Bk transversely of the rail heads in order to heat uniformly the areas on the tread surfaces thereof. This oscillatory movement is imparted to the blowpipes B by rocking the blowpipe carriages C and lead screw 88 about the pivotal connections 85 of the arms 84. In order to insure Ysuch an oscillatory movement at all times during rotation of the drive shaft 11, vertical connecting arms |28 are provided to connect the drive shaft '11 to the lead screw 88, as shown in Figs. 3 and 6.

-The lower 1ends of these arms are eccentrically mounted at |29. on the drive shaft 11 adjacent to the collars83 which bear against the outer walls of the brackets 80. The upper ends of the arms |28 have central openings and are mounted at |30 on the lead screw 88. Referring to Fig. 3, the arm |28 nearest the truck T is retained in position by cap screws I3| and |32 which`are received in threaded openings at the ends of drive shaft 11 and lead screw 88, respectively.

In commencing a heat treating operation, it is sometimes desirable to impart only an oscillatory movement to the nozzles 65 before moving them over rail tread surfaces. For this reason, the vdriving mechanism for moving the blowpipe carriages 4C longitudinally of the rails in opposite directions may be rendered operative or inoperative as desired, independently of the oscillatory movement imparted to the. blowpipes B by the drive shaft 11.

Referring to Figs. 3, 4,Y and 5, the driving mechanism for actuating the blowpipe carriages C on the lead screw 88 may comprise a gear |33 `mounted on the-drive shaft 11 which is adapted to drive, through an idler gear |34, a gear mounted on the end of the lead screw 88. The gears |33 and |35 are iixedly secured by set screws |36 and |31 to the drive shaft 11 and lead screw 88, respectively. As shown in Fig. 5, the idler gear |34 is loosely mounted at the reduced portion |38 of a stub shaft |39, and'is retained thereon by a washer |40 and cap screw |4| passing into an internally threaded opening' at the reduced end of the stubI shaft |39. 'I'he opposite end of the stub shaft |39 is. threadedly secured at |42 in an opening near the periphery of an arcuate shaped arm |43 which is provided with a vertical handle |44,'as shown inFig. 4. The arm |43 is loosely mounted on the drive p shaft 11, and is retained in position thereon between thevhub of the gear |33 and a collar |45 secured by a set screw |46 to the shaft 11. The stub shaft |39 is-so positioned on the arm |43 that, when the arm |43 is moved to a "down position by the handle 44, the idler gear |34 only engages the lower gear |33 on the shaft 11;

and, when the arm |43 is moved to an up Y position 4by the handle |44, the idler gear |34 or down position so that the gear |34 will maintain its engagement with either both or one of the gears |33 and |35, the peripheral edge thereof is provided with two spaced depressions |41 for partially receiving a ball bearing |48 which is urged against the peripheral edge of the arm |43 by a helical spring |49, as shown in Fig. 5. The spring |49 is fixed in a recess in a block |50 having a U-shaped groove |5| forreceiving and guiding the outer peripheral portion of the arm |43. 'I'he block |50 is secured by cap screws |5| to one arm .of a. right 'angle bracket |52, the other arm of which is welded at |53 to the inside wall of the bracket 80. Thus, when the drive shaft 11A is rotated. by the handle 18, the blowpipe carriages C can be moved longitudinally of the rails,66 by moving the handle |44 of the arm |43 upward, so that the idler gear |34 on the stub shaft" |39 will engage both` the gears |33 and |35 on the drive shaft 11 and lead screw 88.

In order to produce heat treated areas on the tread surfaces' of the rails 66 which varyin width in a longitudinal direction of the rails at the boundaries betweensuch areas and untreatand |62 which'are secured to the right hand bracket 80 and U-shaped member 82, respec'- tively. A clutch M for engaging and disengaging the two sections of the shaft |85 for starting and stopping the transverse movement of the blowpipes B comprises a pair of cooperating toothed elements |63 and |64,'the toothed element |63 being iixedly secured to one section of the shaft |58, and the toothed element |64 being shiftable and keyed on the other section of the shaft. |58. As shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3, the shiftable element |64 is provided with a grooved collar |65 to receive the ends of a fork |66 which is formed at one end of 'a handle |61.

The handle |61 is provided with a stub shaft |68.

that is journaled in a bearing |69 carried byfa bracket |10 which is secured to the U-shaped member 82, as shown in Figs. 5, 6, and '1. Be-

tween the end of the bearing |69 and the flanged,

end |1| of the stub shaft |68, a compressed helical spring |12 is coiled'aboutthe shaft |68 to provide sufficient friction to maintain the handle |61 of the clutch M in either an engaged or disengaged position.

A bevel gear |13 secured by a set screw |14 to the endof one section of the shaft |58 engages a bevel gear |15A which is secured by a set screw |16 to the end of a threaded shaft I 11 that ex,- tends through an opening |18 in the side wall of the U-shaped member 82. The shaft |11 is jour'- naled at the opening |18 by an annular member |19 which is welded at |80 to the side wall of the U-shaped member 82. Within the U-shaped member 82. as shown 'in Fig. '7, the shaft |11 passes through an internally threaded nut |8| whichextends upward and which is formed integrally with a longitudinal plate |82 upon which the U-shaped member 82 rests. Referring particularly to Figs. 3 and 4, each end of the plate |82 is provided with an upwardly extending transverse projection |83 having under cut bearing grooves |84 for receiving similar shaped transverse recesses in the side walls of the in'- verted U-shaped channel member 82 and blocks |85, which snugly t and are secured in the hollow ends of the member 82. It will thus be seen that, as the threadedshaft |11 is rotated, it will move through the internally threaded nut |8|. Will carry the entire oscillating and longitudinal feeding mechanism of the blowpipe carriages C and the blowpipes B, which are all mounted on the member 82, transversely of the rails by the transverse movement of the member 82 on the plate |82.

'Iwo adjustments comprising the vertical adjustment attained by turning the handknob and the transverse adjustment attained by turning the handknobs |26, have already been described. These two adjustments are limited in movement and are preferably employed after the blowpipes B have been approximately located above the tread surfaces of the rails at the point where the heat treating operation is to take place. In order to increase the flexibility of the apparatus H, longitudinal and additional transverse and vertical adjusting mechanisms are provided so that the apparatus can readily be posi'- tioned for a heat treating operation after the truck T has been moved near a rail joint or other point where it is desired to heat treat the tread surface areas of rails.

Referring to Figs. 3, 4, and 7, the apparatus H is adjustable longitudinally of the rails 66 by providingv the plate |82 with downwardly extending and inwardly tapering side walls |86 havingl at horizontal ends |81. The ilat ends |81 rest on and are adapted to slide along the flat horizontal upper ends |88 of the inwardly tapered side walls |88 of a rectangular shaped hollow block |80. The end walls |8| of the block |80 are considerably thicker than the side walls |89, and are provided with upwardly extending projections 82, as shown in Fig. 6, having longitudinal undercut bearing grooves |83 on each side thereof for receiving the inwardly tapering side walls |86 of the plate |82. .Thus, the plate |82 rests and is slidable' on the side and end walls |88 and |8| of the block |80, and is guided in a longitudinal direction by the projections 82 at the thickened end walls |8|.

As shown in Figs. 3 and 7, the plate |82 is moved longitudinally along the block |80 by mechanism comprising an internally threaded nut |84 that is integral with the plate |82 and extends downwardly therefrom, opposite the upwardly extending and internally threaded nut |8|, into the hollow of the rectangular shaped block |80. The nut |84 is adapted to receive the threaded end of a shaft Y through an opening |86 in the right hand end wall "|8|, and is provided with a handle |81. Collars 88 bearing against the opposite sides of the end wall |8|, secured by set screws |88 on of the heads of the rails 66. in addition to the limitedV transverse adjustment obtained by the handknobs |26 described above, the bottom surfaces of end walls |8| ofthe block |88 are prowhich extends' vided with downwardly extending projections |88", as shown inFig. 3. The projections |88 have transverse undercut bearing grooves 200 which receive similar shaped recesses formed at the ends of a main supporting bracket 20| having side ribs or flanges 202. Referring to Fig. 7, a threaded lead screw 203 having a handwheel 204 at one end thereof is employed to move the hollow block '|80 and apparatus mounted thereon transversely of the rail heads on the bracket 20|. 'I'he lead screw 203 passes into the hollow of the block |80 through an internally threaded nut 205 which is secured by a cap screw 206 at an opening in the side wall |88 of the block |80. An upwardly extending lug 201 which is integral with the. bracket 20| is provided with an opening to receive the reduced end 208 of the lead screw 203, and a collar 208 bearing against the lug 201 is secured by a set screw 2| 0 to the end of the lead screw 203 to prevent longitudinal movement thereof when it is rotated by the handwheel 204 to move the nut 205 and block transversely of the bracket 20|.

prises a handle 2N mounted on the end of al shaft 2|2 that extends through an opening in the downwardly extending projection 2|3 at the end of the bracket 20|, and through anopening 2| 4 in a vertical plate 2|5 formed integral with the bracket 20| and its ribs 202. The side edges 2|6 of the plate 2|5 are beveled, and one of the edges 2|6 slidably fits into an undercut vertical bearing groove 2|1 in a supporting block 2|8. As shown in Fig. 5, the plate 2| 5 is maintained in vertical alignment on the block 2|8 by a beveled strip 2|8 secured to the block 2 I8 by cap screws 220 and forming an undercut bearing groove 22| for the opposite edge 2|6 of the plate 2|5.

Integral with the block 2 I8 is a horizontal ledge 238 which is secured by threaded bolts 240 to the forward end of the truck frame 30, as shown In Fig. 1. Referring to Figs. 3 and 5, a large recess 222 of the cross sectional shape indicated by the dotted line 223 is formed in the block. 2| 8, the opening of the recess 222 being covered by the plate 2|5 which is vertically movable in the undercut bearing grooves 2|6 and 22| on each side of the recess.

The mechanism for moving the plate 2 I5 vertically includes a beveled gear 224 disposed in the recess 222, the hub of which is secured by a set screw 225 to the end of the shaft 2| at the opening 2|4 in the plate 2|5. Longitudinal movement of the shaft 2| is prevented by the at face of the gear 224 bearing against one side of the plate 2 |5, and by a collar 226 bearing against the opposite side of the plate 2|5 and secured by a set screw 221 to the shaft 2|2. i

The gear 224 engages a beveled gear 228 hav ing a hub 228 that is internally threaded and adapted to move along a threaded lead screw 230 which extends vertically in the recess 222 and through openings 23| and 232 in the top and bottom of the supporting block 2| 8. A countersunk cap screw 233, the head 234 of which fits flush against the inside face of the plate 2|5, passes a hole at the bottom of the block 2|8 and an opening at the lower end of the lead screw 230 to prevent rotation and longitudinal movement of the lead screw 23|.

The plate 2|5 is provided-with a projection 236 that is integral therewith, the projection 236 having an opening 231 through'which the lead screw 230 passes. Between the projection 236 and the hub 229 of the gear 228 a roller thrust bearing 238 is mounted on the lead screw 230, so that the gear 228 can be moved along the lead screw 230 238 which in turn rests on hub 229 of the gear 228. When the gear 228 is moved downward on the lead screw 230 by driving the gear 224 on the shaft 2 I2, the force of gravity will cause the thrust bearing 238, projection 236 and plate 2|5 to move downward vas a single" unit with the gear'228. When the gear 228 is moved upward on the lead screw 230, it will move the thrust bearing 238, projection 236 and plate 2|5 upward with it, the driving gear 224 always being maintained in engagement with the gear 228.

The method of operating the heat treating apparatus just described is substantially as follows:

It will be assumed that the proper number of valves 41 are open between the acetylene cylinders A and manifolds 45 at eachl end of the truck T so' that an adequate supply of acetylene will be delivered to the blowpipes B; that the acetylene and oxygen pressure regulating valves 46 and 41 are adjusted to deliver oxygen and acetylene at predetermined pressures; that the levers 53 of the cut-out valves 52 are in a closed position; that the handknobs 6| and 62 of the oxygen and acetylene valves in the mixing chambers 59 of the blowpipes B have been adjusted to produce flames having a proper rate of heat output `at the nozzles 65, thev llames preferably being neutral or having a slight excess of acetyiene; that the valve 15 is open to deliver acetylene through the conduit 12 to the pilot burner or nozzle 61, which has been ignited; and that the two blowpipe carriages C of each apparatus H mounted at the front of the truck T have been moved together so that the pointers 14 areabutting each other.

With the above assumed conditions, the truck T is moved along a section of track, and byl means of the brake arm 39 the truck T is stopped approximately at the joint of abutting rails.' The pointers 14 are moved downward with the projections 16 resting in the recesses in the top guide rings 15. If any longitudinal movement ofthe blowpipes B is necessary to x the pointers 14 at the extreme ends of' two abuttingrails, the handle |91 of the shaft |95 is turned in the proper direction. This will move the internally threaded nut |94, which is integral with the plate |82, along the threaded end of the shaft |95. The plate |82, on which the mechanism and apparatus including the blowpipes B is mounted, will slide along the top of the hollow rectangular block |90.

If any transverse movement of the blowpipes B is necessary to center the nozzles 65 between the edges of the heads of rails 66, lead screw 203 is turned in the proper direction by means of the handwheel 204. Since longitudinal movement of.

the lead screw 203 is prevented, the nut 205,

which is secured to thewall of the block member |90, will move along the lead screw 230. This will move the hollow block member |90 and apparatus and mechanism. mounted thereon transversely of the rail heads to position properly the nozzles 65.

-Vertical adjustment of the blowpipes B with respect to the vtreadsurfaces of the rails Amay be plate 2 I5, and raise or lower the plate between the undercut bearing grooves 2|1 and22| of the block 2 |8 and beveled strip 2|9.

The above described longitudinal, transverse y and vertical vadjustments move both blowpipes B simultaneously. A If further individual vertical or transverse adjustment of a single blowpipe B is required, without interfering. with the position of the otherV blowpipe B, the handknobs Illand |26 may be used. After the blowpipes B have been properly positioned at the rail joint, the pointers 14 are raised.

With the above described initial adjustments made, the tread surface areas at the ends of abutting rails 66 are heat treated with the apparatus H in the following manner z. It is assumed that the clutch handle |61 is in a disengaged position, and that the handle |44 has been moved downward so that the idler gear |34 is out of engagement with the gear |35 on the lead screw 88.

'I'he handle 18 of the drive shaft 11 is turned continuously so that only an oscillatory movement is imparted to the nozzles 65 at the beginning of the heat treating` operation. This oscillatory movement is imparted to the blowpipes B and blowpipe carriages C from the drive shaft 11 to lead screw 88 through the connecting arms |28, which are eccentrically mounted on thedrive shaft 11. The eccentric movement of the arms |28 causes the lead screw 88, blowpipes B and blowpipe carriagesC, which are all mounted on the V-shaped member 88 and arms 84, to rock about the pivotal connection of the arms 84 on the spaced brackets 80 at 85.

The button 1| of the pilot valve 1 0 is then pressed to increase the size of the pilot ilame.

While the nozzles 65 are oscillating and the pilot 1 llame is operative to ignite the gas at the nozzles 65, the lever 53 of the cut-out valve 52 is movedto its open position and oxygen andacetylene gas will be delivered from the cylinders A and O valves 48 a'nd 5| maintaining the /pressure of f the gases delivered to the blowpipes,l B substantially'constant. In rderto prevent' overheating of the extreme ends and corners of the tread surfaces of the rails 66, the blowpipes B are arranged atpoints near the extreme ends of the, rail heads. In this manner the gase flames are not directlyapplied to the extreme end edges and corners of the rail tread surfaces. The conduction of heat to the corners 'of the rails from the heated portions adjacent thereto is suilicient to raise the corners to the same elevated hardening temperature as the other portions of the heat treated areas.

After this oscillatory movement of the nozzles 65 has been maintained fora length of time suflicient to raise the tread surfaces to an elevated hardening temperature, such as'1600" F.

for example, the blowpipes B are mov'ed longitudinally of the rails and back from the ends of the rail heads, and at the same time a transverse movement is imparted to the blowpipes B. The longitudinal movement of the blowpipes B is obtained by raising thehandle.v |43 so vthat the idler gear|34will engage both the gearsi|33 and |35 on the drive shaft l 11v and lead screw 80, and

the transverse movement thereof isobtained by moving the handle |61 of the clutch M so that the shiftable element |63 on one section of the shaft v|58 willy engage the xed element |64 on the other section of the shaft |58.

In addition to the oscillatory movement of the blowpipes 'B, the rotation of the drive shaft 11 now will drive the lead screw 88 through theA gears, |33, |34, and |35. Since one-half of the lead screw 88 is provided with left hand threads and the other half thereof is provided with right hand threads, the respective half nuts 93 engaging the two halves of the vlead screw 88 will simultaneously move the blowpipe carriages C in opposite directions from the joint between the abutting rails 66.

The drive for the transverse movement of the blowpipes B is completed from the shaft 11 through Vgears |54 and |56, clutch elements |63 and |64 on the two sections of the shaft |58, and bevel gears |13, and |15. This will cause the threaded shaft |11 to feed through the internally threaded nut |8| which is integral with the plate |82, and to move the U-shaped member 82 on the plate |82 transversely of the rails 66. After the nozzles 65 have moved oif the inside edges of the heads of rails 66, the cut-out valve 52 is closed, and-rotation of the drive shaft 11 is stopped.

After a heat treating operation is completed,

Athe brake arm 38 is released, and the truck T surface areas by natural cooling, -a' source of higlf temperature-heat having a substantially constant rate of heat output is preferably employed. By

standardizing on certain size flames and timing the application of the ameson a tread surface area, a simple method of control is obtained.

In this manner the underlying mass' of rails will i remain relatively cool and exert a quenching eifect by withdrawing heat from a heated tread surface to cool and uniformly harden it naturally. Such a procedureinsures the heating of tread surface areas before`too much heat has penetrated into the mass of rails, and also avoids the use of sources of heat `ozt' such intensity that only a superficial or skin hardening is effected.

When heattreating with oxyacetylene fiames,.

` for example, can readily be determined by trial.

The tread surfaceareas are quickly and uniformly raised above the critical range to a temperature of about 1600 F., -and natural .cooling by the relatively cool underlying mass of rails effectively hardens the heat treated areas.

Ordinary rails usually contain from approximately .55 to .80 per cent carbon and a similar amount of manganese, and it has been found that they readily respondA to heat treatment when cooled naturally from ahardening elevated temperature. Rail tread surface areas of the composition just mentioned have been satisfactorily hardened in accordance with the method described above.

It will thus be seen that an improved method of heat treating rails has been provided. By making the hardened areas of approximately trapezoidal or triangular shape, there is thev further economy in the amount of heat required, as compared with producing hardened areasy of rectangular shape, to obtain the. same effective length of hardening along rails.

While I have shown a particular embodiment of my invention., it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that modifications may be made, and that certain 'features may be used independently of others in heat treating tread surfaces of rails either with gas flames or the electric arc, without departing from the spirit and scope of my inable depth; which comprises moving the source of heat longitudinally-of the rail; and, during at least a portion of the longitudinal movement of the source of heat, moving the same transversely of the rail until the high temperature heat is no longer applied to the tread surface, such combined movements of the source of heat constituting a diagonal movement so as to produce a hardened area which varies in width longitudinally of the rail at the boundary between such area and the untreated portion of the rail tread surface adjacent thereto. y

2. The method of heat treating an area on the tread surface of a rail head wherein thelheatr treated area varies in lwidth longrtudinally'of they rail head at the boundary between such heat treated area and untreated portion of the tread surface adjacent thereto;` which includes applying a high temperature heat to the tread surface so as to heat thesame substantially uniformly tolan elevated hardening temperature and to a considerable depth; and simultaneously moving the high temperature heat longitudinally and transversely of the rail head, at least a portion of such combined movements constituting a diagonal movement completely across the tread surface so as to producera hardened area which 'is substantially trapezoidal in shape. l

3. A method of heat treating tr'eadsurface areas at the ends of abutting rails; which comprises applying a source of high temperatlne heat near the extreme end of each rail head to the tread surfaces thereof so as to heat them substantially uniformly to an elevated hardening temperature and to a considerable depth; simultaneously moving the sources of heat longitudinally ofthe rails in opposite directions fromtlhe extreme ends 1thereof and, during the longitudinal movement of the sources of heat, moving the same transversely of the rails until the high 'temperature heat is no longer applied to the tread surfaces, such combined movements of the sources of heat constituting diagonal movements completely across the tread surface of each rail so as to produce similarly shaped heat treated areas which vary in width longitudinally of the rails at the boundaries between such heat treated areas and untreated areas of the tread surfaces adjacent thereto, wherebyy run offs will be provided on the tread surfacesof the abutting rails abruptly from such heat treated areas to the adjacent untreated portions or vice versa.

4. The method of heat treating an area on the tread surface of a rail wherein at least a portion of the boundary between such heat treated area and untreated area' on the tread surface -adjacent extends approximately diagonally across the rail head; which comprises applying one or more high temperature 'ames to the tread surface and oscillating the ame or flames transversely of the railhead so as to heat the same to a substantially uniform elevated hardening temperature and to a considerable depth; moving the oscillating flameor flames longitudinally of the rail; and, a l5 during the longitudinal movement of the oscillating ame or flames, moving the same transversely of the rail until the flame -or flames are no longer applied to the tread surface, such comhined movements of the ame or ames constituting a diagonal movement so as to provide a substantially trapezoidal shaped heat treated area which will prevent rolling stock from passing abruptly from a treated to an untreated portion of the tread surface or vice versa. A 5. The method of heat treating an area on the tread surface of a rail wherein the heat treated area varies in width longitudinally of the rails at the boundary between such heat treated area anduntreated area on the tread surface adjacent thereto; which comprises applying a source of 'high temperature heat to the tread surface so as to heat the same to a substantially uniform elevated hardening temperature and to a con-- siderable depth; moving the source of heat longitudinauy or the rau; and, during the longitudi-l nal movement of the source of heat, moving the,l

same transverselyof the rail until the high temperature heat is no longer applied to the tread surface, at least a vportion of such combined.

40 movements of tthe source of heat 'constituting a diagonal movement completely across the Vtread surface so as to produce a runoff which will prevent rolling stock' from passing abruptly from a treated to an adjacent untreated portion of the tread surface or vice versa; the source of heat being applied quickly to the heat treated area `whereby the underlying mass of the rail comprising the bottom of the head, vthe web and flange thereof will remain relatively cool so as to exert a quenching effect on the heated tread surface by withdrawing heat therefrom to cool and harden the same naturally after the heat has been applied thereto.

6. A method of heat treating tread surface areas at the ends of abutting rails, which comprises applying a soin'ce of high temperature heat near the end of each rail head to the tread surfaces thereof so as to heat them substantially uniformly to an elevated hardening temperature;

50 and moving the sources of heat from the starting point near the end of each rail diagonally across the rails in opposite directions from the extreme ends thereof so as to produce similarly shaped heat treated areas which vary in width'at the 65 boundaries between such heat treated areas and the tread surfaces adjacent thereto.

7. Apparatus for hardening by heat treatment the tread surface areas of abutting .rails at a rail joint, comprising the combination `of sup- 70. porting means adapted to rest upon at least one rail of a track, said supporting means being stationary during a heat treating operation; two sources of heatV mounted for movement on said supporting means and adapted to be disposed 75 above the tread surfaces of adjoining rails; means for adjusting at least one of said sources of heat longitudinally of the rails, and with respect to the rail joint and the supporting means, so as to position both of said sources of heat properly for starting a heat treating operation; and means 5 for reciprocating said sources ofA heat transversely over the tread surfaces of l the rails while said supporting means remains stationary.

8. Apparatus for hardening by heat treatment the tread surface areas of rail ends in situ, com- 10 prising the combination of supporting means adapted to rest at least upon one rail of atrack, said supporting. means being stationary' during a heat treating operation; a source of heat mounted for movement on said supporting means 15 and adapted to be disposed above the tread sur face of a rail; means for adjusting said source of heat with respect to the end of a rail so as to position suchJ source of heat lproperly "for starting a heat treating operation; and means fors'imul- 20 I taneously reciprocating said source of heat transversely ofthe rail head and moving the same diagonally across the rail while said supporting means is stationary.

9. Apparatus for simultaneously heat treating .25 in situtread surface areas at the ends of abutting Y rails at a rail joint, comprisingthe combination of a support; at least two sources of heat mounted for movement on said support and adapted to be disposed above the tread surfaces near the 30 extreme ends of the heads ofthe abutting rails; and means for moving said sources of heat longitudinally of the rails in opposite directions from their abutting ends.

10. Apparatus for simultaneously heat treat- 35 ing in situ tread surface areas at the ends of abutting rails at a rail joint, comprising the combination of a support; at least two sources of heat mounted for movement on said support and "i adapted to be disposed above the tread surfaces 40 abovev the ends of abutting rails for applying gaseous fiames to the tread surfaces thereof; means for moving said burners longitudinally of. 55 the rails in opposite directions from their abutting ends; and means for moving said burners transversely of the rails simultaneously with their longitudinal movement along the rails.

12. Apparatus for heat treating the tread surfaces of railsy comprising a frame; a member pivotally mounted on said frame and adapted to extend longitudinally of a rail; a carriage movable, along said member; a source of heat mounted on said carriage and adapted to be disposed above the tread surface of the rail; and means for oscillating said pivotally mounted member and for moving said carriage along said frame. 13. Means for heat treating the tread surfaces of rails comprising a wheeled truck having'brak- 70 ing means; a support including a bracket secured to and extending fromone end of said truck; and apparatus according to claim 12 mounted on said support. l

14. Apparatus for heat treating the tread surfaces of rails comprising the combination of a frame; a member pivotally mounted on said frame and adapted to extend longitudinally of a rail; mechanism for oscillating said pivotally mounted member; 'a carriage; mechanism for moving said carriage along said member; a burner mounted on said carriage and adapted to be disposed above the tread surface of the rail; a single means for actuating said oscillating mechanism and said carriage moving mechanism; and

means for rendering said carriage moving mechanism inoperative.

15. Apparatus for heat treating the tread surfaces of rails comprising the combination of a support; a frame mountedy for movement on said support; a member carried by said frame adapted to extend longitudinally of a rail; a carriage; means for moving said carriage on said member; a source of heat mounted on said carriage and adapted to be disposed above the tread surface of the rail; and means for moving said frame transversely of said support and acrossthe rail head and for driving said carriage longitudinally of said member and along the rail.

16. Apparatus for heat treating the tread surfaces of rails comprising the combination of a support adapted to extend longitudinally of a rail; a frame mounted for transverse movement on said support; a member pivotally mounted on said frame and adapted to extend longitudinally of the rail; a carriage movable along said member; a source of heat mounted on said carriage and adapted to be disposed above the tread surface of the rail; andmeans for oscillating said pivotally mounted member and for driving said carriage and for moving said frame transversely on said support.

17. Rail heat treating apparatus according to claim 16, in which said means for oscillating said pivotally mounted member and for driving said carriage and for moving said frame transversely on said support comprises a single drive shaft.

18. Means for heat treating the tread surfaces oirails in situ, comprising a wheeled truck having braking means; and apparatus according to claim 14 in which said support comprises a bracket secured to and extending from one end of said truck.

19. Apparatus for h eat treating the tread surfaces of rails comprising the combination of a support adapted to extend longitudinally of a rail; a frame; mechanism for moving said frame transversely on said support; a member pivotally mounted on said frame and adapted to extend longitudinally of the rail; a carriage; mechanism for moving said carriage along said member; a burner mounted on said carriage and adapted to be disposed above the tread surface of the rail; means (for oscillating said pivotally mounted member and for actuating said frame and carriage moving mechanisms; and means for rendering said frame and carriage moving mechanisms inoperative.

. HARRY S. GEORGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441474 *Jun 14, 1944May 11, 1948Carnegie Illinois Steel CorpApparatus for scarfing billets or blooms
US2483483 *Sep 27, 1945Oct 4, 1949Linde Air Prod CoShoe for thermochemical desurfacing machines
US2538366 *Jul 20, 1945Jan 16, 1951Welding Service IncQuenching device for quenching the ends of abutting rails in a track joint
US4294212 *Apr 11, 1978Oct 13, 1981Toyota Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaAir-fuel ratio control method and apparatus of an internal combustion engine
US4464831 *Feb 10, 1982Aug 14, 1984Klockner-Werke AktiengesellschaftMethod and device for fabricating insulated joints for railroad tracks
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/581, 432/10, 266/261, 266/103, 432/229, 266/102, 266/259, 432/88, 432/225, 148/642
International ClassificationC21D9/04
Cooperative ClassificationC21D9/04
European ClassificationC21D9/04