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Publication numberUS2076334 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1937
Filing dateApr 16, 1934
Priority dateApr 16, 1934
Publication numberUS 2076334 A, US 2076334A, US-A-2076334, US2076334 A, US2076334A
InventorsBurns Earl A
Original AssigneeBurns Earl A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diesel engine
US 2076334 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. A. BURNS DIESEL ENGINE April 6, 193 7..

Filed April 16, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet l flllorney :April 6, 1937. A URN 2,076,334

DIESEL ENGINE Filed April 16, 1934 4 Shaets-Sheet 2 Inventor E. A. BURNS I DIESEL ENGINE April 6,1937.

Filed April 16, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Z27ZJzr/m$ I 1' Patented Apr. 6, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DIESEL ENGINE Earl A. Burns, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application April 16, 1934, Serial No. 720,895

2 Claims. (Cl. 123-58) My invention relates generally to Diesel en'- gines, and particularly to an opposed piston type of Diesel engine in which the cylinders are arranged parallel to and circumferentially spaced around the rotary shaft, and an important obiect of my invention is to provide an extremely simplified engine of the type described, which has a remarkably small frontal area, the engines being readily'a'daptable 'to arrangement in tandem on a single shaft.

It *is also an important object of my- -invention to provide an engine of the character described having a good ratio of power to weight,thereby adapting it admirably to use in aircraft.

It is also an important obiectof my invention to provide in an engine of the character described means for changing the reciprocating motion of the piston and connecting rods to a rotating motion of the shafts wherein binding and friction are eliminated thereby taking advantage of the greatest possible power output of a given size of cylinder and stroke.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from a reading of the following description in connection with the drawings, wherein for purposes of illustration I have shown preferred embodiments of my invention.

In the drawings: Figure 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through the preferred embodiment of my invenion.

Figure 2 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken through Figure 1 approximately on the line Figure 3 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken through Figure 1 to the right of the section line 2-2 showing thrust arms and connec-' tions to housing.

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view through one of the pistons and the adjacent cam.

Figure 5 is an elevational view of one of the connecting rods with its guide roller.

Figure 6 is a side elevational view of Figure 5.

Figure 7 is an elevational view of the working face of and showing the cam.

Figure 8 is a representation of the cam curvature.

Figure 9 is a transverse sectional view taken approximately on the line 9--9 of Figure '7.

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 3 taken through another embodiment of the invention showing an alternative manner of arranging the thrust arms.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral I refers generally to a generally rectangular casing which has the five sided cross section indicated in Figure 2, in the longitudinal center of which is mounted the rotary shaft 6 passing through the ends of the casing as indicated at 'l and 8.

At the left hand end of the casing 5 is the scavenger blower casing 9 whichmay be made a part of the casing 5 and which includes the,

outer wall ID with the air intake opening I l and the interiorly spaced partition I2 on either side 10 of which thetvanes 1.3 of thes'blower-c rotor ll work. The blower rotor I4 is journaledon the shaft-6 and has a pinion l5 which is driven by gears 16, I1 which are solid with small pinions l8, l9 which are driven by a gear 20 and keyed 15 on the shaft 6 by means of the key 2|, whereby the, blower rotor I4 is driven at a speed relatively high with respect to the shaft 6.

At a location equally spaced from the-opposite ends of the casing 5 is the cylinder assembly 20 which is generally designated 22 which comprises flve circumferentially spaced cylinders A, B, C,

D, E, respectively, each of which is open at its opposite ends and has leading into the center thereof in a radial manner a fuel intake-23 with which is adapted to be connected any suitable type of fuel injector such as the Bosch or the Hesselman. The cylinders, it will be noted, are designated clockwise and the shaft 6 rotates clockwise. Each of the cylinders is surrounded 30 by a water jacket 24 and of course the fuel inlet 23 passes through the water jacket as does the scavenger air inlet 25 and the spent gas exhaust 26. It will be observed that the scavenger air inlet is connected by a pipe 21 to the peripheral portion of the blower casing. The exhaust 26 is connected to a suitable manifold 28.

The radially inward side of the cylinder assembly indicated by the numeral 29 bears on a set of longitudinally spaced roller bearings 3|, 32 40 which are mounted on the shaft 6.

Outward of the cylinder assembly and at either end thereof and spaced therefrom is a cam wheel 33, 34, respectively, which is keyed as indicated at 35, 36, respectively, to the shaft 6 and also 45 locked by a set screw 31, 38, respectively. The contour of the working face of the cam is indicated in Figures 7, 8 and 9. Figure 9 is a section taken on the line 9-9 of Figure '7 at a point intermediate the rise 39 and the depression or hol- 5 low 40. The cam wheel is provided with equally circumferentially spaced rises and hollows alternating, there being two rises and two hollows, thereby arranging for two power impulses transmitted to the shaft 6 for each cylinder for each 55 revolution of the shaft 6, the power stroke being delivered to the down slope of the rises to cause a rotation of the cam.

Each cylinder is provided with a pair of opposed pistons 42 each of, which has a wrist pin 43a (see Figure 4) pivotally connecting one end of the connecting rod 44a which projects outwardly from the piston and is pivotally connected at its outer end with a thrust arm 45. The pivot 46 extends between the arms 41, 48 which are formed on theouter end of the connecting rod 44 and on the pivot 46 are rotatably mounted three rotatable wheels 50 which engage the concave tracks on the face of the cam. Means for maintaining the wheels 50 in engagement with the grooves 5| in the face of the cam comprises the extension 52 on the arm 41 which carries the roller 53 which engages the back of the track of the cam. g

The thrust arms 45 are also forked and overlap the armsrfil, 62 which are located outside of the arms 41, 48 of the connecting rod and work on the pivot 46. The opposite ends of the thrust arms 45 are pivoted on pins 62: mounted in the interior of the casing as shown in Figure 3, 4

A modified arrangement is shownin Figure in which the thrustarms 45a are angulated in position and carry rollers 53a which engage a suitable track, surface 63 on the back of the cam w fl J One of the faults of all other opposed cylinder engines known to me is the fact that when their exhaust is uncovered before their scavenging port, the scavenging ports are also closed before their exhaust ports, thereby causing loss of motive power. But in my engine such a condition can be corrected simply by changing the rises in the cam -whee1s.

With the cylinders denominated clockwise and a clockwise rotation -of the shaft 6, the firing order will be A, D, B, E, C, A, D, B, E,. C, or 1, 4, 2, 5, 3, 1, 4, 2, 5, 3. This is for one revolution of the shaft and indicates how the power impulses of the engine are balanced.

It is obvious that on the compression stroke in a cylinder the pistons move toward each other and compress the air priorly introduced by the blower; and that as the compression becomes substantially at a maximum the oil is introduced and causes the motivating explosion, or combustion. The pistons then move outward away from each other and through their connecting rods and cam wheels transmit a power impulse to the cams 33, 34 causing shaft 8 to be given rotary motion. When the pistons reach the outer limits of their travel they uncover the exhaust port and scavenging air port in the cylinder walls. The blower then forces air into the cylinder displacing the burnt gases through the exhaust port and recharging the cylinder with a fresh charge of air.

Although I have shown and described herein preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be definitely understood that I do not desire to limit the application of the invention thereto, and any change or changes may be made in material and structure and arrangement of parts within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the subjoined claims;

What isclaimed is: v

1. In an internal combustion engine of the type described, a rotary shaft, a pair of axially spaced cams on said shaft, a cylinder located between said cams and having a pair of opposed pistons working therein and operatively engaging the cams, each of saidcams having a pair of rises' anda pair of depressions, means operatively connecting "said pistons with said cams',"said means including connecting rods. pivoted'to the pistons and to the cy linder and riding on' the cams each connecting rod having roller means operatively engaging the corresponding cam, said roller means including a plurality of rotarywheels rolling againstthe working face'of the Icamand maintained against the dowmslope ofthefcam rises duringthe power stroke of the pistons to rotate the cams. p v

2. In an internal combustion en me of thetype described, a rotary shaft, a pair 0 axially spaced cams on said' shaft, a cylinderlocated between said cams and having a pair of opposed pistons working therein and operatively engaging the cams, each of said cams having a pair of rises and a pair of depressions, means operatively conmeeting said pistons with said cams, said means including connecting rods pivoted to the pistons and .to the cylinder and riding on the cams, each connecting rod having roller means operatively engaging the corresponding cam, said roller means including a plurality of rotary wheels rolling against the working face of the cam and maintained against the down slope of the cam

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5031581 *Aug 15, 1989Jul 16, 1991Powell Brian LCrankless reciprocating machine
US5375567 *Aug 27, 1993Dec 27, 1994Lowi, Jr.; AlvinAdiabatic, two-stroke cycle engine
US5507253 *Sep 23, 1994Apr 16, 1996Lowi, Jr.; AlvinAdiabatic, two-stroke cycle engine having piston-phasing and compression ratio control system
US6305335Aug 7, 2000Oct 23, 2001O'toole Murray J.Compact light weight diesel engine
US7124716Jun 15, 2004Oct 24, 2006Mechanical Innovation, Inc.Internal combustion engine using opposed pistons
US7156056 *Jun 10, 2004Jan 2, 2007Achates Power, LlcTwo-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US7360511Mar 17, 2006Apr 22, 2008Achates Power, Inc.Opposed piston engine
US7546819 *Aug 29, 2006Jun 16, 2009Achates Power.Two-stroke, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US7549401 *Jun 10, 2005Jun 23, 2009Achates Power, Inc.Two-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US7591235Mar 11, 2008Sep 22, 2009Achates Power, Inc.Opposed piston engine with piston compliance
US7784436 *Dec 20, 2006Aug 31, 2010Achates Power, Inc.Two-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US7861679Sep 21, 2009Jan 4, 2011Achates Power, Inc.Cylinder and piston assemblies for opposed piston engines
US8087389 *Jun 22, 2009Jan 3, 2012Achates Power, Inc.Two-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US8276552 *Dec 31, 2010Oct 2, 2012Achates Power, Inc.Opposed piston engine
US8281755Mar 12, 2008Oct 9, 2012Achates Power, Inc.Internal combustion engine with provision for lubricating pistons
US8286596 *Dec 8, 2011Oct 16, 2012Achates Power, Inc.Two-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
US20120152185 *Dec 8, 2011Jun 21, 2012Achates Power, Inc.Two-cycle, opposed-piston internal combustion engine
DE10340670B4 *Sep 4, 2003Aug 20, 2009Valerij AlbrandtRotorenkolbenmotor
WO1995006197A2 *Aug 26, 1994Mar 2, 1995Alvin Lowi JrAdiabatic, two-stroke cycle engine
WO1996009465A1 *Sep 20, 1995Mar 28, 1996Alvin Lowi JrAdiabatic, two-stroke cycle engine having piston phasing and compression ratio control system
WO2003106827A1Oct 2, 2002Dec 24, 2003Gene BeverlyInternal combustion engine using opposed pistons
WO2012019656A1 *Dec 27, 2010Feb 16, 2012Formtech Technologies GmbhSwashplate motor
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/51.00B, 123/51.0BA, 74/57, 123/56.9
International ClassificationF01B3/04, F02B3/06, F02B3/00, F01B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02B3/06, F01B3/045
European ClassificationF01B3/04M