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Publication numberUS2078166 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1937
Filing dateNov 7, 1933
Priority dateNov 7, 1933
Publication numberUS 2078166 A, US 2078166A, US-A-2078166, US2078166 A, US2078166A
InventorsSchwerin Frank H
Original AssigneeDuff Norton Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Throwing machine
US 2078166 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 20, 1937. F. H. SCHWERIN THROWING MACHINE Filed Nov. .7, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 34 38 3912 34 34 35 38 z awg vjgTo April 1937- F. H. SCHWERIN 2,078,166

THROWING MACHINE Filed Nov. '7, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 0 INVENTOR 9. WAW

ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 20, 1931 uNi-rso STATES PATENT/OFFICE Dull-Norton Manufacturing Company, Pittsburgh, Pa a corporation of Pennsylvania Application November 7, 1933, Serial No. 6,963

4Ciaims.

This invention relates to throwing machines, and more particularly to target throwing machines of the type having a spring-operated throwing arm with an electric motor and clutch mechanism for restoring'the throwing arm and tensioning the spring.

Such machines have a continuously running motor and driving mechanism through which the motor moves the carrier or throwing arm 1 into retracted position and slightly beyond dead center so that the tension of the spring tends to move the arm further in the same direction. As soon as the arm reaches such a position, the clutch is automatically disengaged and thearm 15 is held in retracted position by a trip latch. when this latch is released, the throwing arm 3 is rotated rapidly by the spring through an angle of approximately 180 and throws the target. The clutch is automatically engaged when the g arm again slows down to the rotative speed of the clutch mechanism.

The trip latch is ordinarily released by a solenoidl which can be controlled from an electric push-button switch at the. end of a flexible as cable. This is advantageous when trap shooting because it makes the location of the referee, or puller, optional, and thus makes the command of pull always audible to him. When the button is pressed, the target release is substantially an instantaneous and with such smooth action that there is no danger of breaking the target while releasing it.

Target throwing machines of this character eliminate the flinch producing pull, and there 35 is no wobbling or jumping 01' the frame when the target is released regardless of the speed at which it is operated.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved electric throwing machine which is cf- 40 ficient and dependable, and has its parts in a particularly compact relationship, and in which the spring tension, angle of elevation, and/or direction of release can be controlled manually from the rear of the machine where the operator 45 is not exposed to injury in case of accidental operation of the machine. The invention is particularly intended for throwing targets, but features of the invention are applicable to the throwing of various objects. With a suitable 50 carrier arm, \the invention can be used for throwing balls or other projectiles.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electric target throwing machine in which the force and direction of throwing can be ac- 55 curately controlled to obtain such uniform re- (Ci. 12H) suits that two machines, because of perfect synchronizatio are all that are necessary for throwing singles, perfect doubles and sheet.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will appear or be pointed out as the s specification proceeds.

In the accompanying drawings. forming part hereof:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the rear and one side of a target throwing machine embodying the invention; I

' Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, enlarged top plan view of the machine shown inFlg. 1, with the targets removed;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fi 2;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary, enlarged vertical sec-. tion showing most of .the operating mechanism and latching means of. the machine illustrated in the other views; r I

Fig. 5 is a rear elevation of the latching means shown in Fig. 4; and 4 Fig. 6 is a sectional view along the line 6-4 of Fig. 5, with the motor also shown. I

The throwing machine includes a base II and 5 an upwardly extending support II. A. frame I4 is pivotally connected to the support I! by a bolt I 6 and can be held against pivotal movement by a locking knob l8, which threads on a stud 20 extending from the frame It and through an arcuate slot in the support H. The locking knob clamps a square washer 22, having a notched face, against a notched surface along the sides of the slot. The frame It is thus securely locked against pivotal movement.

. When the frame it is to be moved about the pivot bolt It to change the angle of elevation at which the targets are thrown, the knob i8 is backed off so that the washer 22 can move out of the notches on the surface of the sup- 40 port 12, and the stud 20 move freely along the slot. Thus, the knob i8 and its associated elements comprise manually operated means for controlling the angle of elevation at which the targets are thrown. The frame II has a rearward extension, and a handle 24 connected to this extension of the frame provides a'convenient lever arm for moving the frame. V

The connection between the support I! and the base In is shown inv section in Fig. 3. The support II has a downwardly extending ring 26, which fits within a bearing 28 in the base. A retaining plate 30 is of larger diameter than the bearing 28 and is fastened to the ring 26 by screws. The retaining plate Ill prevents vertical movement of the support I2 with respect to the base I 0, but permits rotary movement of the support.

A lug 32 on the support I2 extends between 5 screws 34. Each of these screws threads through a lug 36 upstanding from the base I0. Locknuts 38 hold the screws 34 in any set position. The lug 32 abuts against the screws 34 to limit the rotary movement of the support I2 on the base I0. The screws 34 are set to permit a limited angular movement of the lug 32 before striking the screws 34, so that the operator can move the support I2 and vary the direction in which the objects are thrown sufliciently to allow for variations in the wind conditions. Thus, the

screws 34 and the parts with which they cooperate comprise manually operated means for controlling the direction in which the targets are thrown.

Referring again to Fig. 1, a housing 31 is secured to the forward end of the frame I4. A shaft 39 is journaled in the housing 31 and has a carrier or throwing arm 40 fastened to its upper end. When the carrier arm is in retracted position, as shown in the drawings, it is directly above the frame I4 and substantially parallel to the frame. Different kinds of carrier arms are used, depending on the shape and size of the targets or other projectiles to be thrown.

The carrier arm 40 is held in retracted position by a trip latch 42 and has a downwardly extending lug 44 with a hardened button 46 which abuts against the trip latch 42 when this latch is in raised position.

The trip latch 42 is supported for pivotal movement by a pin 48 on the back of a solenoid housing 50. This solenoid housing is iocated behind and is preferably an integral part of the housing 31. A motor 52 is fastened to the frame I4 by screws 54. Power is supplied to the motor. through a cable 56. The motor is angularly disposed on the base I4, as shown in Fig. 2, so that the driving connections between the motor 52 and the mechanism in the housing 31 pass to one side of the solenoid housing 50. These driving connections include a motor shaft 51, a flexible coupling 58, and a worm shaft 59.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 6, the shaft 39 turns in bearings 60 in the housing 31 and both ends of the shaft extend from the housing. The carrier or throwing arm 40 has a split clamp end fitting the upper endof the shaft 39 clamped to the shaft by a screw 62. A key 64 prevents the arm 40 from turning on the shaft 39.

A crank 66 fastened to the lower end of the shaft 39 by a split clamp end with a screw 68 and a key I0 causes the crank and shaft to turn as a. unit. A spring I2 is connected with a pin I4 extending downward from the crank. This spring extends under the frame I4 and is anchored to the rearward extension of the frame I4 by an eye bolt I6 in which the end of the spring hooks. The eye bolt 16 passes through the end of the frame I4 and is threaded to receive a wing nut I8. Turning of the nut I8 in one direction draws the eye bolt further through the end of the frame I4 and increases the tension of the spring. By turning the nut I8 in the opposite direction the tension of the spring is decreased. The force with which the machine throws a target depends on the tension of the spring I2, and the eye bolt and wing nut therefore comprise means for controlling the force with which the machine throws the targets.

The crank 66 is secured to the shaft 39 in such relation that when the throwing arm is stopped in retracted position by the trip latch 42, the crank 66 is slightly beyond dead center so that the spring I2 holds the throwing arm against the trip latch. The dead center position of the crank 66 is the position which it occupies when it has tensioned the spring as far as possible and further movement relieves some of the tension of the spring.

The throwing arm 40 has spaced bosses 80, and a rail 82 is connected to these bosses by screws. A stud 84 (Fig. 2) near the shaft end of the arm 40 serves as a stop for positioning the target. The arm 40 shown in the drawings is designed for throwing double targets, but other kinds of throwing arms can be employed. Targets 86 are shown in position on the throwing arm in Fig. 1.

Referring again to Figs. 4 and 6, a ratchet wheel 90 is freely rotatable on the shaft 39. The ratchet wheel 90 has a downwardly extending hub 92 on which is keyed a worm wheel 94. A worm 96 on the worm shaft 59 is driven by the motor 52. The worm 98 rotates the worm wheel 94 in a counter-clockwise direction in Fig. 6.

A pawl cage I 00 has a split clamp end fastened to the shaft 39 by a key I02 and clamping screw I04. A pawl I06 is connected to the pawl cage by a vertical pin I08. A spring I I0 compressed between the pawl I06 and the cage I00 urges the pawl into engagement with the teeth of the ratchet wheel. A cam surface II2 on the tail of the pawl contacts with a roller II4 located in a recess of the housing 31 and cams the pawl out of engagement with the teeth of the ratchet wheel just after the crank 66 passes dead center.

The worm wheel 94 and ratchet wheel 90 rotate continuously at a uniform speed. When the tail of the pawl is not against the roller II4, the spring IIO holds the pawl against the ratchet wheel, which rotates the pawl cage and shaft 39 to tension the spring I2 and move the throwing arm 40 into retracted position. This pawl and ratchet mechanism is a clutch between the motoroperated mechanism and the shaft 39. The roller H4 cooperates with the cam surface 2 on the tail of the pawl I06 to automatically disengage the clutch as soon as the spring I2 is tensioned, the arm 40 in retracted position, and the crank 66 beyond dead center so that the spring I2 tends to rotate the shaft 39 in the same direction as it was turned by the motor. The trip latch 42 holds the arm in retracted position.

Fig. 5 shows the button 46 of the throwing arm in contact with the trip latch. The pin 48 by which the trip latch is pivotally supported is located in such position that the portion of the latch with which the button contacts has a component of movement in the same direction as the arm 40 tends to move. The pressure of the arm 40 against the trip latch 42 therefore tends to move the latch about the pin 48 and out of the path of the arm.

The trip latch 42 is held in the path of the arm 40 by a trip latch dog I20, which is pinned on a crank shaft I22 extending from the solenoid housing 50. A spring I24 normally holds the trip latch dog against a stop I26 projecting from the side of the housing 50. A roller I28 at the upper end of the trip latch dog I20 contacts with a curved face I30 of the trip latch.

The center of curvature of this face I30 is on the axis of the crankshaft I22, so that the movement of the roller I28 along the face I30 does not move the trip latch. This design accurately positions the trip latch even though there is some variation at timesin the position of the trip latch dog.

When the crank-shaft I22 is turned in a countor-clockwise direction in Fig. 5, the roller I28 moves beyond the end of the face I30 and permits the trip latch 42 to drop and release the throwing arm 40.

The power for turning the crank-shaft I22 is furnished by a solenoid I36 which attracts an armature I36. A crank arm I40 pinned on the crank-shaft H22 inside of the housing 50 is connected to the armature I66 by a link I42.

The operation of the solenoid is controlled by an electric push-button switch I46 at the end of a flexible cable I48. This remote control of the solenoid by the switch on the end of the flexible cable is advantageous when trap shooting because it makes the location of the referee, or puller, optional, so that he can always be in a position to hear the command to pull.

The operation of the machine will be reviewed briefly. When the carrier or throwing arm 40 is in the retracted position shown inpthe drawings, the spring I2 is tensioned and the crank 66 is slightly beyond dead center so that the spring I2 tends to move the arm through its throwing angle. The arm 40 is held in retracted position by the trip latch 42.

At the command of pull the operator presses the push-button switch I46 to supply power to the solenoid I36 which attracts the armature I30. The armature moves the crank arm I40 to turn the crank-shaft I22. This turning movement of the crank-shaft I22 rocks the trip latch dog I20 counter-clockwise in Fig. 5 and permits the trip latch 42 to drop out of the path of the arm 40. When the arm 40 is released, the spring I2 swings the arm quickly through its throwing angle and the targets 86 are hurled into the air with a high speed of rotation resulting from the rapidity with which the throwing arm moves.

The momentum carries the throwing arm beyond its outer dead center and further movement it causes the crank 66 to again tension the spring 112. During the throwing movement of the arm 40 it turns very much faster than'the rotative speed of the ratchet wheel 90, and the pawl therefore ratchets over the teeth of the ratchet wheel.

As soon as the rotative speed of the arm 40 and shaft 26 slows down to'that of the ratcheLwheel, the pawl engages the ratchet teeth, and the shaft 39 is rotated with the ratchet wheel to again tension the spring I2 and move the throwing arm 40 back into retracted position.

After the spring I2 is fully tensioned,,the shaft The throwing arm 40 approaches retracted position slowly enough to enable the operator to 70 place every target in exactly the right position without danger. I

The preferred embodiment of the invention has been described. but changes and modifications can be made, and various features of the inven- 75 tion used alone or in combination with other features without departing from the invention defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A throwing machine of the character described comprising a frame, a shaft journaled in the frame at the forward end of the frame with the opposite ends of said'shaft extending above and below said frame; a throwing arm connected withthe upwardly extending end of the shaft and located directly above the frame when in retracted position; a crank below the frame and connected with the downwardly extending end of said shaft; a spring connected with the crank for supplying power to operate the throwing arm; mechanism connectedwith the frame and located between the spring and the retracted throwing arm, said mechanism including an electric motor for tensioning the spring and moving the throwing arm into retracted position; and an extension at the rearward end of the frame providing an anchor for one end of the spring so that the spring extends under substantially the entire length of said mechanism and beyond the rearward end of said mechanism.

2. The combinationin a throwing machine of a frame; a housing on the frame; a shaft journaled in the housing with its upper and lower ends extending from the housing; a throwing arm secured to the upwardly extending end of the shaft; a crank secured on the downwardly extending end of the shaft; a spring connected with the crank for supplying power to operate the throwing arm; and mechanism within the housing including a continuously-rotated, motor-driven clutch which automatically engages the shaft and continues its rotation after each throwing operation to bring the arm back into retracted position and tension the spring.

3. The combination in a throwing machine, of a frame; a housing on the frame; a shaft journaled in the housing with its upper and lower ends extending from the housing; a throwing arm secured to the upwardly extending end of the shaft; a crank secured on the downwardly extending end of the shaft; a spring connected with the crank for supplying power to operate the throwing arm; clutch mechanism within the housing including a pawl and ratchet, one of which is connected with the shaft and the other of which is rotated by a motor; and cam means including a roller on the inside of the housing for disengaging the clutch by moving the pawl out of contact with the ratchet.

4. In a throwing machine of the character described, a shaft extending through a housing, a carrier arm connected with the upper end of the shaft above the housing, a crank connected with the lower end of the shaft below the housing, a spring connected with the crank for operating the shaft and carrier arm to throw a projectile, mechanism including an automatic clutch for tensioning the spring and moving the throwing arminto retracted position, after each throwing operation, a latch for holding the carrier arm in retracted position, latch-operating means at the back of the housing, an electric motor behind the latch-operating means, speed-reduction gearing in the housing including a worm wheel connected with the clutch, and a worm for driving said worm wheel. and driving connections between said motor and reduction gearing including shafting extending past one side of the latch-operating means and diagonally across the machine between the motor and the worm.

' FRANK H. SCHWERIII.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2711163 *Apr 17, 1952Jun 21, 1955Richardson James JTarget trap
US2925812 *Jun 16, 1954Feb 23, 1960Olin MathiesonTarget throwing apparatus
US2928383 *Jul 28, 1955Mar 15, 1960Erik Ohlson BengtArrangement for operating a skeet trap and loading targets thereon
US3070082 *Aug 2, 1961Dec 25, 1962Olin MathiesonTarget throwing apparatus
US3086426 *Sep 4, 1958Apr 23, 1963Gauthier Gmbh AAngularly and rectilinearly adjustable tool carrier
US3971357 *Dec 27, 1974Jul 27, 1976Laporte Jean MichelMethod and apparatus for throwing frangible targets
US4481932 *Sep 30, 1982Nov 13, 1984Olson Scott MFor throwing targets
US4831996 *Jun 5, 1987May 23, 1989Cero Larry JTarget projecting apparatus
US6026796 *Dec 20, 1996Feb 22, 2000Laporte Ball Trap S.A.Target launcher apparatus for shooting exercise with fire arms
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/8, 124/32, 124/43
International ClassificationF41J9/20, F41J9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41J9/20
European ClassificationF41J9/20