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Publication numberUS2078358 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1937
Filing dateJul 29, 1933
Priority dateJul 29, 1933
Publication numberUS 2078358 A, US 2078358A, US-A-2078358, US2078358 A, US2078358A
InventorsJacob Jr George N, Wright Jr Ernest B
Original AssigneeJacob Jr George N, Wright Jr Ernest B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brush and method of making the same
US 2078358 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, 1937- E. B, WRIGHT, JR.. er AL 2,078,358

BRUSH AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed July 29, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l 30 mun/uhmm l 1 lill INVENTOR ATTORNEY April 27, 1937. E. B. WRIGHT. JR.. Er AL 2,078,358

METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed July ze, 1933 2 sheets-sheet 2 WWWW WWW WWW WWW WWWW WWW WWWWWW WW W WW WW Patented Apr. 27, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Ernest B. Wright, Jr., Montclair, and George N. Jacob, Jr., Belleville, N. J.

Application July 29, 1933, Serial No. l682,736

l2 Claims.

This invention relates to brushes and methods oi' manufacturing the same. and aims generally to provide a durable high grade brush oi good appearance made by a simple and inexpensive method which does not require the use of special molds.

The production at reasonable cost ofY good brushes having tufts of single length bristles has been a long recognised want in the brush industry,

and many eorts have been made to meet this want. The methods and means heretofore employed for anchoring the bristles in the face portion of the brush body have, however, been either comparatively costly or unsatisfactory in results.

l5 I'he present invention provides an improved brush in which tufts of single length bristles and the individual bristles of each tuft are securely held, and a method of manufacturing such brushes at comparatively low cost in respect to equipment, labor and materials.

The invention comprises a brush having spaced tufts of bristles the ends of which are embedded in a layer of solidified binding material which forms the face of the brush body. the bristles of each embedded tuft end extending in the general direction of the length of the tuft but being spaced apart, and the binding material extending into the embedded ends of the tufts between individual bristles thereof so that the bristles .'10 are individually gripped by the binding material and each embedded tuft end is securely anchored in the facing layer of binding material; and a method wherein the bristle tufts are positioned in desired spaced arrangement and constricted at a point spaced from their inner ends a distance substantially greater than the depth to which the ends of the tufts are to be embedded in the binding material, and while the tufts are so relatively positioned and constricted, the inner ends of the tufts are immersed in a layer of liquid binding material which. while the tuft ends are held in position therein, is solidified to form the facing layer of the brush. Constricting the tufts at a 4,-, point spaced from their inner ends a distance greater than the depth to which the ends of the tufts are to be embedded in the binding material causes the bristles of these end portions of the tufts to diverge so as to be spaced apart for a 50 distance from their ends greater than the depth to which they are to be embedded in the layer of binding material. and thus affords opportunity for the binding material to enter and grip the individual bristles. Other features of the brush 55 and of the method are described hereinafter and (Cl. 3D0-21) the invention is particularly pointed out in the claims.

The invention in its broader aspect is not limited to brushes having the bristles arranged in spaced tufts, but includes on its product side, and 5 the method extends to the making of, brushes in which the bristles are arranged in spaced rows or other groups or assemblages.

The steps of the method can be carried out by the use of relatively unskilled labor, and the l0 brushes can be produced in large quantities at a minimum of expense for equipment, and particularly without any substantial outlay for special equipment which cannot be used for general purposes in a brush making factory. No pressure 15 molding devices or closed molds are needed.

In the accompanying drawings:-

Fig. 1 represents diagrammatically a jouncing machine and hopper arrangement for accomplishing the insertion of the bristles in controlled 2n form into a template:

Fig. 2 represents the Jouncing machine and hopper shown in Fig. l as rearranged to separate out loose bristles from between the tufts;

Fig. 3 illustrates the template with inserted as bristle tufts;

Fig. 4 is a view in section showing an assembly of a back or ller block with a shell or casing member to form a sink or well in which a rubber composition solution or other suitable binder ma- 30 terial is deposited in liquid condition:

Fig. 5 shows the manner of arranging the assembly shown in Fig. 3 with the assembly shown in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a view of a finished brush; 35

Fig. 'l is a fragmentary view in cross-section of the brush, illustrating the character of union between the bristles and the facing layer of the brush;

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on line l--B 40 of Fig. 9 showing bristles held and constricted as they may be for making a brush of which the bristles are arranged in spaced rows;

Fig. 9 is a section taken on line 8 9 of Fig. 8 and showing the root ends of the bristles inserted in the layer of binding material of the brush body and indicating by dotted lines the position taken by the bristles when the constricting means is removed; and

Fig. 10 shows a template which may be used 50 in making a brush such as illustrated by Fig. 9.

The drawings show a paint stippling brush of preferred form according to the invention. Referring especially to Figs. 5, 6 and 7, the brush body comprises a back or filler block I8. which for lightness is preferably made of a light wood such as balsa wood, a facing layer II of solidified binding material, and, in the particular construction shown, a shell or casing I2 of metal or other suitable material, which covers the back and edges of the filler block In and the edges of the facing layer H. The shell i2 may be cast or otherwise formed, and may have a narrow inwardly extending flange I3 at its edge which in the completed brush extends slightly over the surface of the facing layer Ii. The facing layer Il is, as hereinafter explained, solidified in place and becomes thereby suitably adherent to the face of the illler block I0, or it may itself entirely illl the metal shell or casing as in the brush shown in Fig. 9. Additional means, such as the screws commonly employed for securing face plates of brushes, may be resorted to for more firmly securing the facing layer, but the use of such additional means is not necessary when the brush body comprises a shell or casing as in the construction shown.

The embedded end, or root, portions of the tufts most desirably extend completely through the facing layer Il and abut against the filler block il), and the bristles of each embedded tuft root portion are spaced apart for their whole embedded length, and binding material extends into the embedded ends of the tufts between individual bristles thereof, so that. as stated. the bristles are individually gripped by the binding material and each embedded tuft end is securely anchored in the facing layer. In addition to being so spaced apart, the bristles of the embedded tuft ends diverge slightly from the outer surface of the facing layer inward. This affords additional security in the anchoring of the tufts in the facing layer. The filler block and the extending side portion of the casing form a sink or well Il in which the binding material is solidined to form the facing layer Il as hereinafter described.

In making a brush in accordance with the method of the invention and as now considered best, the procedure is as follows:-The required number of tufts of single length bristles, that is. bristles of the length of the tufts. are formed and arranged in the spaced relation which they are to have in the brush, and each tuft is tightly gripped, or constricted, at a point spaced from its inner end a. distance substantially greater than the depth to which that end of the tuft is to be embedded in the facing layer of the brush body. This is accomplished most desirably by filling the bristles into a perforated tuft holding plate, or template, having perforations of a size to hold tightly tufts of the desired size and spaced and arranged according to the desired spacing and arrangement of the tufts in the completed brush. The template may be a comparatively thin plate. as shown at i5 in Figs. 3 and 5, of metal or other suitable rigid material. A metal plate of about one-quarter inch thickness has been found suitable. The tuft-forming bristles may be grouped and entered into the perforations of the template in any suitable manner, but the bristles should be packed tightly in the perforations and the tufts should extend through the plate a uniform distance substantially greater than the depth to which the ends of the tufts are to be embedded in the facing layer of the brush body. The bristles being tightly packed in the perforations of the template and thiis constricted. the extending end portions of the tufts will expand and take an outwardly flaring form, so that the bristles of each tuft root end portion will be spaced apart for a distance from their ends greater than the depth to which they are to be immersed in the binding material.

The template or tuft holder l5 is most conveniently filled by the well-known jouncing method. For this purpose a jouncing machine such as indicated by Fig. 1 may be used. The template i5 is positioned at the bottom of a hopper i6 set on spacing blocks i1 on the jouncing table il of the machine and held in position by dowel pins i8, the template being spaced from the top of the table a distance equal to the length to which it is desired that the bristle tufts shall project through the template. I'he jouncing of the table IB is effected by an eccentric 20 on a rotating shaft 2|, the eccentric giving an up and down movement to a plate 22 which is guided by the legs 22 of a stationary table 24. The jouncing table Il is normally supported on the stationary table 24 by means of shouldered tappets 25, reduced lower ends of which extend through openings in the table 2l and project beneath the table to be engaged by an adjustable jouncing bar 26 carried by the plate 22, so that when the shaft 2i rotates the iouncing bar 26 will engage the tappets 2l at each reciprocation and thereby iounce the table I2. The bristles are placed in the hopper standing vertically so that they may be iounced into and through the perforations in the template. The jounclng operation is carried on for several minutes or until the perforations of the template become tightly packed with the bristles, which will extend through the template to a uniform extent determined by the distance that the template is set above the top of the jouncing table I2.

After the tufts have been thus formed of bristies packed tightly in. the perforations of the template. the hopper and template are lifted from the Jouncing table, and the assembled template and hopper may then be inverted and placed on the same or another jouncing mechanism and lightly jounced to free the tufts projecting into the hopper froml the mass of loose bristles which have been left between the tufts. Most desirably, before this second jouncing operation the ends of the shorter projecting outwardly daring portions 20 of the tufts are immersed in or bathed with a suitable solidiflabie adhesive or binding material such as a suitable rubber cement or bakelite cement to hold the ends of the bristles spaced apart and thereby insure against loss or displacement of individual bristles and minimize movement of the tufts in the template in the second jouncing operation. 'Ihe particular material used will depend on the binding material used for the main portion of the facing layer of the brush.

The template is most desirably counter-sunk at the entrance side of its perforations. as indicated at 2l, thereby facilitating the introduction of the bristles into the perforations. inasmuch as the template does not become part of the completed brush, such counter-sinking is not objectionable as it would be if the perforated plate were to become the face of the brush. When the plate serves as the face of the brush, it is undesirable for sanitary reasons to have its perforations counter-sunk. as dirt lodged around the base of the bristles is not then readily removed. In the brush of the present invention, of which the template forms no part, the facing layer of binding material has a clean, smooth surface which dts closely against and around the base of the tufts.

A brush body minus its facing layer having been positioned back side down, the open sink or well in its face portion is then nearly filled with solidiflable liquid binding material as indicated at 3| in Fig. 4. The binding material used should be a solidiflable liquid of low surface tension which will wet the bristles. We have found it most desirable to use a vulcanizable solution of rubber of the kind known commercially as plastic rubber cement and which, as we understand, consists of rubber with suitable amounts of sulphur and an accelerator, in a solvent the boiling point of which is higher than the vulcanizing temperature of the solution. Such a solution is at normal atmospheric temperatures about as fluid as thin molasses, and when subjected to heat of about 240 F. first becomes very fluid and then hardens without disturbing ebullition and without noticeable loss of volume provided it is not subjected to the vulcanizing heat for too long a period. Other materials which will solidify without disturbing ebullition may be used, and we have found especially suitable a solution of an artificial resin of the bakelite type such as the material known as bakelite brush cement.

The template carrying the bristle tufts is brought into position over the layer of liquid rubber solution and moved downward to cause the downwardly extending root ends of the tufts to enter and be immersed in the rubber solution until they strike against the upper surface 32 of the filler block I0. They are then allowed to rest in this position with the weight of the template borne by the bristles the ends of which rest on the filler block. The rubber solution penetrates between the individual bristles of the immersed tuft epd portions, and because of its low surface tension and ability to wet the bristles, the solution not only readily enters and fills the spaces between the bristles of the tuft ends but it also rises slightly within each tuft, forming a tapered outwardly curving shoulder 33 about each tuft, which is of advantage in that it gives a more secure anchoring of the tuft in the facing layer of the brush and also facilitates cleaning of the brush.

The rubber solution is introduced into the sink of the brush body in measured quantity gauged to allow for displacement resulting from the immersion of the ends of the tufts, so that when the tuft ends have been immersed the level of the solution will be brought to the desired point on the side of the body shell I2. Instead of first filling the liquid binding material into the sink of the brush body and then moving the ends of the assembled tufts down into the liquid, the assembled tufts might obviously be placed with their ends resting on the bottom of the sink and the binding material thereafter poured into the sink. In both procedures the tuft ends may be considered as being immersed in the liquid binding material, and the term immerse is used in the claims with this understanding.

Because of the length of the tuft ends extendf ing downward from the template, the template does not come into contact with the rubber solution or other solidiiiable liquid binding material. Adhesion of the template to the face of the brush is thus avoided so that it is free to be stripped oi from the bristles of the completed brush. In addition, the weight of the template borne by the immersed bristles serves to maintain the tuft ends in the desired position in the liquid layer and with respect to the brush body. The resulting pressing of the immersed bristle ends against the surface of the filling block, which will be more or less according to the weight of the template, is also of advantage in that it tends to emphasize, or at least maintain, the flare or spread condition of the immersed root ends of the tufts which has resulted from the tight packing of the bristles of each tuft into a perforation of the template and the consequent constriction of the tuft at a point distant from its root end greater than the depth to which the end is immersed in the liquid.

If adhesive material is, as stated, applied to the root end of the tufts before the second jouncing operation, the material used is desirably but not necessarily one which will dissolve quickly in the liquid binding material of the surface layer. If a solution is used, it should have a readily volatile solvent so that it will set quickly, and in such case, the tuft ends should not be immersed in the facing layer binding material until the solvent of the adhesive material has been allowed to evaporate. Most desirably, and especially if the adhesive material is not readily soluble in the binding material, the adhesive material is applied only to the extreme ends of the bristles, so that a considerable portion of the immersed length of the spaced bristles is left free for penetration of the liquid binding material of the surface layer. If, for example, the surface layer is to be approximately 1A" thick, the adhesive applied to the ends of the tufts should best not extend more than approximately one-third of that distance from the extreme ends of the bristles. Even though the adhesive material is not readily soluble in the binding material, any undissolved adhesive material will be securely embedded in and bound to the surrounding material of the solidified facing layer.

After the bristles and the brush body have been thus assembled with the tuft root ends immersed in the liquid facing layer and abutted against the filling block, and while the tufts are so held, the facing layer is solidied either by letting it stand a sufficient time or by subjecting it to some influence, as determined by the kind of binding material used. If the material is a vulcanizable rubber solution, the assembly is preferably allowed to stand for several hours, usually about 6 hours, or more, with the rubber solution referred to, to allow for the escape of pocketed air carried into the rubber solution by the tuft roots. The assembled brush body and bristles are then placed in a vulcanizing chamber and heat-treated for a suitable period, usually, when using the rubber composition referred to, for about 12 hours at a temperature of about 240 F. After removal of the brush from the vulcanizing chamber, the template I5 is removed by withdrawing it over the free ends of the tufts, and the brush is thereafter given any desired finishing operations, such as trimming the outer ends of the tufts to desired form by means of a suitable cutter.

If the brush body does not have a metal or other shell or casing, other means are provided to serve as side walls extending above the surface of the body block to form a sink or open mold for holding the liquid binding material, o1' a complete open mold no part of which is to form any part of the brush body may be used to form a facing layer with the bristle tufts anchored therein, which may subsequently be attached to a brush back or body piece in any suitable manner.

The spacing of the bristles in the individual tufts at the surface of the facing layer has the effect of increasing the spread of the tufts at their spaced rows by the usual hand method.

outer ends. Because of this, a desired spreading of the tufts and spacing of the bristles at the working face of the brush may be obtained with the use of shorter or stiffer bristles than when the bristles are closely held together at the surface of the body facing layer, and a further advantage resulting from such spacing of the bristles at the surface of the facing layer is that, without changing the spacing of the tufts or the size of the tufts or the length or stiffness of the bristles, the character of the brush with respect to the distribution of the bristles at the working face of the brush may be varied merely by varying the length to which the inner ends of the tufts are caused to extend beyond the template at the time that the tuft ends are immersed in the binding material and thereby varying the degree of spacing of the bristles at the surface of the body facing layer. The shorter the tuft ends and the closer the template comes to the layer of binding material, the less will the bristles be spaced at the surface of the facing layer, and the less the bristles are spaced at the surface of the facing layer the tighter, or less spread, will the tufts be at their outer ends; and the longer the tuft ends and the farther the template stands off from the layer of binding material, the more the tufts will tend to spread at their outer ends because of the greater spacing of the bristles at the surface of the facing layer. These additional advantages of the new method and the product thereof are of great practical importance.

While the greatest advantage of the invention is obtained when the bristles are arranged in spaced tufts, since the ends of the tufts held and constricted as described are free to expand in all lateral directions, yet much advantage results from use of the new method in making brushes in which the tufts are arranged in spaced rows or other spaced arrangement even though when arranged in rows the bristles extending below the holding and constricting means are free to spread only transversely to the length of the row.

Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate the making of a. brush in which the bristles are arranged in spaced rows. As shown, the bristles are arranged in four rows 40 and are constricted and held in the desired arrangement by spacing bars 4| between the rows and an encircling band I2. When it is desired that the openings between the rows of bristles shall be closed at the ends of the brush, the bristles may be arranged to extend about the ends of the bars Il within the band I2, as shown by Fig. 8. The bristles may be so arranged in In so arranging the bristles a. sufficient quantity should be used so that when enclosed by the band I2 the bristles will be packed fairly tightly between the bars and between the outer bars and the band.

The bars and band, or other bristle-holding means, are positioned at a suitable distance from the butt, or root, end of the bristles greater than the distance to which the root end portions are to be inserted in the binding material, so that the bristles at and near the root ends thereof will spread and be spaced somewhat apart transversely to the length of the row. The thus spread root ends of the bristles are then. as in making a brush with spaced tufts as before described, immersed in a layer of solidiable liquid binding material such as hereinbefore described, and after the binding material has penetrated into the immersed portions of the rows of bristles between the spaced bristles thereof, the binding material is solidified, as by vulcanizing when a vulcanizable binding material is used, and thereafter the bristle-holding and constricting means is removed. The bristles on being relieved from the constraint of the holding means will spread somewhat, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 9.

As shown by Fig. 9, the body of the brush has no filling block as in Fig. 5, but is composed merely of the layer of binding material Ila filled into a metal shell I2a. The shell I2a may be provided with a suitable number of inwardly projecting studs 43 to be embedded in the binding material Ila so as to insure a strong connection between the layer or body of binding material and the casing.

Instead of following the hand method of arranging the bristles in spaced rows and holding them by means of spacing bars and a dummy band as illustrated by Figs. 8 and 9, the bristles may be jounced into a suitable template, such, for example, as the template lia shown by Fig. 10.

What is claimed is:

l. A brush, comprising a plurality of tufts of single length bristles, and a body having a tuftholding layer of solidified binding material which forms the face of the body and in which the root end portions of the tufts are embedded and by which they are held, the emlbedded root portion of the bristles of each tuft extending in the general direction of the length of the tuft and the bristles of each tuft being spaced apart at the surface of and within the facing layer, and

the binding material extending into said root portions between individual bristles thereof and the surface of the facing layer curving outwardly about the tufts, whereby the bristles are individually gripped by the binding material and each root portion as a whole is securely anchored in the facing layer.

2. A brush, comprising a plurality of tufts of single length bristles, and a body having a tuftholding layer of vulcanized rubber composition which forms the face of the body and in which the root end portions of the tufts are embedded and by which they are held, the embedded root portion of the bristles of each tuft extending in the general direction of the length of the tuft and the bristles of each tuft being spaced apart at the surface of the facing layer and diverging from the surface of the facing layer inward, and the rubber composition extending into said root portions between individual bristles thereof and the surface of the facing layer curving outwardly about the tufts, whereby the bristles are individually gripped by the rubber composition and each root portion as a whole is anchored in the facing layer.

3. A brush, comprising a plurality of tufts of single length bristles, and a body portion having a filler block and an enclosing shell the edge portion of which extends beyond the block and a tuft-holding layer of solidified binding material within the extending edge portion of the shell and which forms the face of the body, the root end portions of the tufts being embedded in said facing layer and being held thereby, the embedded root portion of the bristles of each tuft extending in the general direction of the length of the tuft and the bristles of each tuft being spaced apart at the surface of the facing layer and diverging from the surface of the facing layer inward, and the binding material extending into said root portions between individual bristles thereof and the surface of the facing layer curving outwardly about the tufts.

4. A brush, comprising a plurality of spaced assemblages of single length bristles, and a body having a bristle holding layer of solidied binding material which forms the face oi the body and in which the root end portions oi the bristles are embedded and by which they are held, the embedded root portions of the bristles extending in the general direction of the free portions of the bristles and the bristles of each assemblage being spaced apart in at least one lateral direction at the surface of the facing layer and diverging in at least one such lateral direction from the surface of the facing layer inward, and the binding material extending into the root portions of the assemblages between individual bristles thereof and the surface of the facing layer curving outwardly about the tufts, whereby the bristies are individually gripped by the binding material and the root portion of each assemblage as a whole is securely anchored in the facing layer.

5. A brush, comprising a plurality of spaced rows of single length bristles. and a body having a bristle-holding layer of solidified binding material which forms the face of the body and in which the root end portions of the bristles are embedded and by which they are held, the embedded root portion of the bristles of each row extending in the general direction of the free portions of the bristles and the bristles of each row being spaced apart transversely of the length' of the row at the surface of the facing layer and diverging transversely of the length of the row from the surface of the facing layer inward, and the binding material extending into said root portions between individual bristles thereof and the surface of the facing layer curving outwardly about the rows of bristles, whereby the bristles are individually gripped by the binding material and each root portion as a whole is securely anchored in the facing layer.

6. The method of making a brush having spaced tufts of bristles the ends of which are embedded in solidified binding material forming the facing layer of the brush, which comprises immersing the root end portions of the tufts in a layer of liquid binding material in an open face portion of the brush body, the liquid binding material being one which will wet the bristles and which is solidiable by heat and the boiling point of which is higher than the temperature by which the material is solidified, holding the bristles in position in the binding material with the bristles of each root portion extending downward in the general direction of the length of the tuft and diverging from the outer surface of the binding material inward, and after entrappedair has been allowed to escape from the liquid binding material solidifying the material by subjecting it to heat.

7. The method oi' making a brush having spaced tufts of bristles the inner ends of which are embedded in solidined binding material, which comprises positioning the tufts in the desired spaced arrangement and constricting them at a point spaced from their inner ends a distance substantially greater than the depth to which the ends are to be embedded in the binding material, whereby the bristles of the inner end portions of the tufts are caused to diverge and to be spaced apart for a distance from their ends greater than the depth to which they are to be embedded in the binding material, immersing the inner end portions of the tufts with their bristles thus spaced apart in a layer of solidiilable liquid binding material which will wet the bristles, and solidifying the binding material after it has entered into the end portions of the tufts between the spaced bristles thereof.

8. The method of making a brush having spaced tufts of bristles the inner ends of which are embedded in a facing layer of solidified binding material, which comprises positioning the tufts in the desired spaced arrangement in a template whereby the tufts are constricted at a point spaced from their inner ends a distance substantiaily greater than the depth to which the ends are to be embedded in the binding material, whereby the bristles of the inner end portions of the tufts are caused to diverge and to be spaced apart for a distance from their ends greater than .the depth to which they are to be embedded in the binding material, immersing the inner end portions of the tufts with their bristles thus spaced apart in a layer of a liquid binding material in an open container, the liquid material being one which will wet the bristles and which is solidinable substantially without loss of volume, solidiiying the binding material while the tufts are held in position by the weight of the template with their bristle ends resting on the bottom of the container, and thereafter removing the template.

9. The method of making a brush having spaced tufts of bristles the inner ends of which are embedded in a facing layer of solidified binding material, which comprises positioning the tufts in the desired spaced arrangement in a template whereby the tufts are constricted at a point spaced from their inner ends and the bristies of the inner end portions of the tufts are caused to diverge, immersing the inner end portions of the tufts with their bristles thus spaced apart in a layer of a solidiable liquid binding material in an open container by moving the tuft-carrying template downward to project the tuft ends into the liquid and against the bottom of the container, solidifying the binding material while the tufts are held in position by the weight of the template with their bristle ends resting on the bottom of the container, and thereafter removing the template.

l0. The method of making a brush having spaced tufts oi bristles the inner ends of which are embedded in solidified binding material, which comprises positioning the tufts in the desired spaced arrangement in a template whereby the tufts are constricted at a point spaced from their inner ends and the bristles of the nner end portions of the tufts are caused to diverge, applying adhesive material to the ends of the bristles of the inner end portions oi the tufts, immersing the inner end portions of the tufts in a layer of a solidiable liquid binding material which will wet the bristles, solidifying the binding material after it has entered into the end portions of the tufts between the spaced bristles thereof above adhesive material on the ends of the bristles, and thereafter removing the template.

l1. The method of making a brush having spaced assemblages of bristles the inner ends of which are embedded in solidified binding material, which comprises positioning the bristles in the desired arrangement and holding and constricting them at a point spaced from their inner ends a distance greater than the depth to which the ends are to be embedded in the binding material, whereby the inner. end portions of the bristles of each assemblage are caused to diverge substantially greater than the depth to which and to be relatively loosely grouped, immersing the ends are tobe embedded in the binding mathe inner end portions of the bristles thus loosely terial, whereby the inner end Portions oi' the grouped in a layer of solidiabie binding matebristles oi' each row are caused to diverge trans- 5 rial which will wet the bristles, and solidifying verseiy ot the length of the row. lmmersing the 6 the binding material after it has entered between inner end portions oi' the bristles while the rows the end portions of the loosely grouped bristles. are thus held and oonstricted in a layer o! solid- 12. The method ot making a brush having iiiable binding material which will wet the briaspaced rows of bristles the inner ends of which ties, and solidiiying the binding material ai'ter i 10 are embedded in a facing layer o! solidified bindit has entered into the immersed portions of the l0 l ing material, which comprises positioning the rows between the laterally spaced bristles thereof.

bristles in the desired arrangement of spaced rows and holding and constricting them at a ERNEST B. WRIGHT. Jl. point spaced from their inner ends a distance GEORGE N. JACOB. Ja.

CERTIFICATE or CORRECTION, Patent No. 2,078,358. Apr-i1 27, 1937.

ERNEST B. WEIGHT, JE., Er AL.

It is hereby certi fied that error appears in the printed specification of the above `numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 5, first column. line 19, claim 4, for "tufts" read assemblages; `and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of June. A. D. 193'?.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

bristles of each assemblage are caused to diverge substantially greater than the depth to which and to be relatively loosely grouped, immersing the ends are tobe embedded in the binding mathe inner end portions of the bristles thus loosely terial, whereby the inner end Portions oi' the grouped in a layer of solidiabie binding matebristles oi' each row are caused to diverge trans- 5 rial which will wet the bristles, and solidifying verseiy ot the length of the row. lmmersing the 6 the binding material after it has entered between inner end portions oi' the bristles while the rows the end portions of the loosely grouped bristles. are thus held and oonstricted in a layer o! solid- 12. The method ot making a brush having iiiable binding material which will wet the briaspaced rows of bristles the inner ends of which ties, and solidiiying the binding material ai'ter i 10 are embedded in a facing layer o! solidified bindit has entered into the immersed portions of the l0 l ing material, which comprises positioning the rows between the laterally spaced bristles thereof.

bristles in the desired arrangement of spaced rows and holding and constricting them at a ERNEST B. WRIGHT. Jl. point spaced from their inner ends a distance GEORGE N. JACOB. Ja.

CERTIFICATE or CORRECTION, Patent No. 2,078,358. Apr-i1 27, 1937.

ERNEST B. WEIGHT, JE., Er AL.

It is hereby certi fied that error appears in the printed specification of the above `numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Page 5, first column. line 19, claim 4, for "tufts" read assemblages; `and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 29th day of June. A. D. 193'?.

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508908 *May 2, 1946May 23, 1950Enchelmaier William FManufacture of brush equipment
US2655409 *Jul 5, 1947Oct 13, 1953Columbia Protektosite Co IncArt of and apparatus for molding brushes
US3521646 *Dec 23, 1968Jul 28, 1970Taylor Glen HMethod of rooting hair in synthetic scalp by securing hair and dipping into liquid plastic
US3932570 *Mar 21, 1972Jan 13, 1976Imperial Chemical Industries LimitedMethod of sealing fibers in apertures
US4375380 *Jul 2, 1981Mar 1, 1983Battelle Development CorporationProcess and installation for manufacturing a photothermal converter apparatus
US4391665 *Aug 10, 1981Jul 5, 1983Mitchell Jr Paul BMethod of making pile material
US6220672 *Apr 17, 1997Apr 24, 2001Coronet-Werke GmbhMethod for the production of bristle goods
DE1079589B *Mar 5, 1958Apr 14, 1960Max WitteHerstellung gebuendelter Buersten
Classifications
U.S. Classification300/21, 264/243, 15/192
International ClassificationA46B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA46B3/00
European ClassificationA46B3/00