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Publication numberUS2078634 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1937
Filing dateMar 22, 1935
Priority dateMar 26, 1934
Also published asDE654605C
Publication numberUS 2078634 A, US 2078634A, US-A-2078634, US2078634 A, US2078634A
InventorsKarlstrom Fredrik Johan Robert
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle
US 2078634 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, 1937. F. J. R.,KAR| STRM NOZZLE Filed March 22, 1955 c f m/ L U W IN VENTOR.

a? ATTORNEY.

Patented Apr.Y 27, 1937 UNITED. STATES NOZZLE Fredrik Johan Robert Karlstrm, Stockholm, Sweden, assignor to Electrolux Corporation, Dover, Del., a corporation oi.' Delaware Application March 22, 1935, Serial No. 12,386 In Germany March Z6, 1934 9 Claims.

The present invention relates to' vacuum cleaners and more particularly to an improved cleaningtool or nozzle for use in connection with a vacuum cleaner unit.

Still more particularly the invention relates to an improved cleaning tool provided with a rotary brush member driven by the air stream passing through the tool. Such a tool is intended primarily for cleaning within narrow spaces, such as for instance between the sections of steam radiators or the like, but obviously may be used for cleaning other objects.

The objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description l5 considered in connection with the accompanying drawing which forms a part of this speciflcation and of which:

Fig. 1 is a view of a vacuum cleaner unit to which a nozzle in accordance with the present invention is connected by means of a hose;

Fig. 2 is a view, chiey in cross-section, of one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2;

5 Fig. i is a view, partly in cross-section, of

anoth'g'e embodiment of the invention;

Fig.`5 is an end view of the device show'n in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional View of a still fur- -30 ther embodiment of the invention; and

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 'I-'I of Fig. 6.

Referring to the drawing, reference character I0 designates generally a vacuum cleaner unit of well known type, which is provided with a casihg'having therein a dust separating member and a motor-fan unit for producing flow of air therethrough. The air is drawn into the cleaner through a exible hose II, to the other end of which Various types of cleaning nozzles may be attached. Reference character I2 designates generally a cleaning nozle in accordance with the present invention, which is attached to hose II.

Reference character I3 designates a room heat- I5 ing radiator which, as is` well known, comprises a plurality of spaced sections. The nozzle I2 is adapted to be inserted between the sections to remove dirt which has there collected.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 2 and 3,

'0 reference character I4 designate-s a hollow body member formed with a generally cylindrical portion I5 and a flattened portion I6. Portion I5 comprises a slightly tapered part II, which is adapted to frictionally receive the connecting i5 member' on the end of hose II, and a conical member.

portion I8 in which are rigidly secured turbine guide vanes I9, which are integral with a hub member 20. Obviously, part I8 need not be conical, but could be cylindrical, for instance. Member 20 forms a bearing for a rotatably 5 mounted shaft 2|, to one end of which a rotor 22 is secured adjacent to guide vanes I9. As is shown, the guide vanes are a part of a casting, while the rotor is a stamping.

Flattened portion I6 is formed with a plul0 rality of suction inlet opennigs 23. A wire screen or the like 24 may be placed within flattened portion I6, so as to prevent the entrance of particles substantially larger than dust particles, which might interfere with the turbine. Screen 15 24 also prevents the drawing in of threads and the like, which might become entangled in the turbine rotor.

Flattened portion I6 is formed with cylindrical bearing support 25 for rotatably supporting a 20 sleeve 26 secured to, or integral with, shaft 2|.

A brush 2l, comprising a central member 28 made of twisted wire and bristles 29 extending at right angles thereto, is removably secured Within sleeve 26 of shaft 2|. wire 28 is secured to a split sleeve 30, split at 3|, which is made of resilient material. Sleeve 30 is adapted to frictionally engage within sleeve 26. To assure the prevention of rotation between these two parts, sleeves 26 and 3U are formedy 30 with engageable beads 32 and 33, respectively.

'Ihe operation of the above described device is as follows:

When the nozzle I2 is connected to a vacuum cleaner unit, as is shown in Fig. 1, and the motorfan unit of the cleaner is operated, air is drawn in through the inlet openings 23 in the nozzle and passes through the turbine guide vanes I9, where it is directed so as to act most eiilciently -upon the turbine rotor 22, thereby imparting 40 rotation to the latter. This air then passes through the hose II to the cleaner unit, from which it is discharged through an outlet opening. Rotation of the rotor 22 causes similar rotation of shaft 2| and the brush 2'I secured to 45 the end thereof. If the brush is placed in contact with a dusty' surface, such as the surfaces of the sections of radiator I3, the rotation of the brush dislodges dirt which is drawn into the nozzle through the openings 23, from whence it is'carried to the cleaner unit I0 and separated from the air stream by the dust separating Due to the narrowness of the space between sections of a radiator, 4it is impossible to manipulate a nozzle therein so as to pass the For this purpose, twisted 25 y suction opening cr openings thereoi directly over the surface to be cleaned. However, brush 21 stirs up the dust and it is immediately drawn into openings 23. l

By arranging the bristles at right angles to the axis of rotation of the brush. their greatest striking effect is obtained. That is to say, the bristles are at right angles to the surfaces being cleaned vand hence more force is required to deflect them than if they are at an inclined angle to the surface. Moreover, the length of the bristles necessary to form a brush of a given diameter is less if the bristles extend straight out at right angles to the axis of the brush than if they extend at an inclined angle thereto, and, inasmuch as shorter bristles offer more resistance to bending, a brush so constructed is stiffer than one with inclined bristles, and when rotated, the bristles strike the surface with greater force.

Ii.' it is desired to use the nozzle without the rotating brush, the latter may be readily removed by simply pulling it to the left, as viewed in Fig. 2, whereupon split sleeve 30 may be pulled out of -sleeve 26 and the brush disconnected from shaft Thereafter, the shaft will of course be ro-.

2|. tated by the rotor 22, but this will have no effect upon the cleaning action of the tool.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 4 and 5, attened portion I6 is formed with a single opening 34 bounded by diverging lips 35. Brush 21 comprises a central wire member 28 and bristles 36 which are secured to wire 28 at an angle thereto, so as to be substantially parallel to diverging lips 35. The lips extend close enough to the brush so that air passing therebetween attains a comparatively high velocity. As is clearly shown in Fig. 4, brush 21 is located partly within opening 34. This opening may be protected by means of a wire screen o`r the like 31, which may be removable, although the `rotation of the outer end 'of brush 21 tends to impart sufficient centrifugal force to heavy objects so as to throw them away from opening 34 and thus prevent their admission into the nozzle.

The turbine arrangement of the embodiment shown in' Figs. 4 and 5 may be similar to that shown in Fig. 2, and hence has not been illustrated. The brush end of the shaft is supported in sleeve 26 rotatably mounted in bearing support 25 and the brush may be removable in the same manner as illustrated in Fig. 2.

'I'he operation of this embodiment is similar to that previously described, except that 'the full benet of having the bristles extending at right angles to the axis of rotation is not obtained.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 6 and '7, a planetary reduction gearing is employed between the rotor and the shaft 2|, in order to obtain more power for rotating the brush. In this embodiment a sleeve 40 is secured withinthe fiattened portion i6 and serves to support a member 4| having a circular internal race 42. Stationary turbine guide vanes 43A are integral with member 4| and serve to aid in supporting member 4| Within cylindrical portion i5. A spider 44 is secured to shaft 2| within race 42 and has rotatably mounted thereon 'a plurality of rollers 45. These rollers are preferably faced with a friction material 46, such as rubber. These rollers engage and roll around within race 42. Rollers 45 also .engage a sleeve 41, rotatably mounted on shaft 2|. A turbine rotor 48 is rigidly secured to sleeve 41. A flexible coupling member 49, of rubber or the like, is employed to connect the nozzle to the 'A end of hose Il and replaces conical part l1 of the embodiment shown in Fig. 2.I The left hand end, as viewed in Fig. 6, of the nozzle may beconstructed in accordance with the embodiment shown in either Fig. 2 or Fig. 4.

The operation of the embodiment shown in Figs. 6 and 7 is as follows:

Air drawn into the nozzles is directed by stationary guide vanes 43, so as to strike the guide vanes of rotor 48 and impart rotation thereto. Sleeve 41 is rigidly secured to rotor 48, and hence rotates therewith.. The rotation of sleeve 41, which engages rollers 45, causes the latter to rotate about their axes. and also to roll around within race 42. This latter motion causes spider 44 to be driven in rotation and hence to rotate shaft 2|. Due to the difference in diameter between sleeve 41 and race 42, a substantial reduction in speed occurs between the turbine rotor and the shaft. The arrangement constitutes a planetary reduction gearing between the rotor and the shaft, and also constitutes a roller bearing for supporting the turbine end of shaft 2|.

While there have been shown three more or less specific embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that this has been done for purposes of illustration only, and that the scopel of the invention is to be limited only by the ap pended -claims when viewed in the light of the prior art.

What is claimed is: l

l. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said iiattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a shaft rotatably mounted within said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating said shaft,

and a brush connected to said shaft adjacent to said inlet opening and having flexible bristles extending laterally beyond said flattened porion.

2. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a. hollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a iiattened portion, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a shaft rotatably mounted within said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating 'said shaft, and a brush connected to said shaft, said brush being located wholly outside said member and adjacent to saidinlet opening and having flexible bristles extending laterally beyond said iiattened portion.

3. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a Ashaft rotatably mounted within said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating/said shaft, and a brush connected to said shaft, said brush being located wholly outside said member and adjacent to said inlet opening and including flexible' bristles mounted at right angles to the axis of revolution of said shaft, said bristles extending laterally beyond said flattened portion.

4. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a rhollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening bounded by diverging lips whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a shaft rotatably mounted in said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating said shaft, and a brush connected to said shaft within said opening and having flexible bristles extending laterally beyond said flattened portion.

5. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening bounded by diverging lips whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces.a shaft rotatably mounted in said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating said shaft, and a brush connected to said shaft within said opening, said brush comprising iiexible bristles arranged in the form of a cone the side of which is substantially parallel to said diverging lips, said bristles extending laterally beyond said flattened portion.

6. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening whereby cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a shaft rotatably mounted within said member, a turbine within the cylindrical portion of said member for rotating said shaft. a brush connected to said shaft adjacent to said inlet opening and having flexible bristles extending laterally beyond said flattened portion, and screening over said inlet opening, said brush being outside of said screening and said turbine being 7. 4A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member formed with a suction inlet opening adjacenttoone end thereof, a cylindrical race mounted within said member, a rotatable shaft, a spider secured to said shaft within said race, planetary members rotatably mounted on said spider and engaging said race, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft and having torque transmitting engagement with said planetary members, a turbine rotor secured to said sleeve, stationary turbine guide vanes mounted in said hollow member adjacent to said rotor, and a brush connected to said shaft adjacent to said inlet opening.

8. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body member formed with a suction inlet opening adjacent to one end thereof, a cylindrical race mounted within said member, a rotatable shaft, a spider secured to said shaft Within said race, planetary members rotatably mounted on said spider and engaging said race, a sleeve rotatably mounted on said shaft and having torque transmitting engagement with said planetary members, a turbine rotor secured to said sleeve, stationary turbine guide vanes secured to said race adjacent to said rotor, and a brush connected to said shaft adjacent to said inlet opening.

9. A suction nozzle for a vacuum cleaner including a hollow body having a cylindrical portion and a flattened portion, said cylindrical portion being adapted to be connected to a source of suction, said flattened portion being formed with a suction inlet opening whereby 'cleaning may be accomplished in narrow spaces, a shaft rotatably mounted in said member and extending within both said cylindrical and hollow portions, a turbine within said cylindrical portion for rotating said shaft, and a brush connected to said shaft adjacent to said inlet opening, said brush including a central rigid portion having a diameter not greater than the thickness of said flattened portion and flexible bristles carried by said central portion and having a lateral extent greater than the thickness of said flattened portion.

FREDRIK JOHAN ROBERT KARLSTRM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2471109 *Oct 2, 1945May 24, 1949Hunt Hilland GPneumatically driven power unit
US2477681 *Aug 17, 1945Aug 2, 1949Electrolux CorpElectropneumatic power unit
US2485543 *Aug 29, 1946Oct 25, 1949Andreau Jean EdouardPower plant
US2701892 *Sep 25, 1951Feb 15, 1955Richard H NeitzelVacuum cleaner
US2703904 *Mar 8, 1952Mar 15, 1955Mary E De LongAir driven rotating brush for vacuum cleaners
US3023553 *Sep 28, 1959Mar 6, 1962Flatland Lloyd PVacuum-powered aspirating lathe
US3238556 *May 7, 1963Mar 8, 1966Martin Elmer APortable suction and blower unit
US4117564 *Sep 6, 1977Oct 3, 1978Alberto RussoOil tank cleaning apparatus
US4554702 *Aug 10, 1984Nov 26, 1985The Scott & Fetzer CompanyVacuum driven tool
US4589161 *Aug 8, 1985May 20, 1986The Scott & Fetzer CompanyVacuum driven tool
US4984329 *Sep 14, 1989Jan 15, 1991Steamatic, Inc.Duct sweeper
US5107568 *May 22, 1990Apr 28, 1992Steamatic, Inc.Duct sweeper
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US5860188 *Sep 16, 1997Jan 19, 1999The Hoover CompanyCarpet extractor
US6269519 *Oct 15, 1999Aug 7, 2001Esteam Manufacturing Ltd.Duct cleaning device
US6813810 *Apr 12, 2002Nov 9, 2004Merlin D. BeynonVacuum nozzle assembly and system
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US7594298Feb 17, 2005Sep 29, 2009Euro-Pro Operating, LlcDuster having a rotatable vacuum pick-up
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/385, 451/358, 15/387
International ClassificationB62D3/02, A47L9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/0416, A47L9/0427, A47L9/0466
European ClassificationA47L9/04C, A47L9/04B4, A47L9/04E2