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Publication numberUS2079273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1937
Filing dateMay 16, 1930
Priority dateMay 16, 1930
Publication numberUS 2079273 A, US 2079273A, US-A-2079273, US2079273 A, US2079273A
InventorsAngier Edward H
Original AssigneeAngier Edward H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Creping
US 2079273 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. H. ANGIER May 4, 193 7.

GREPING Filed May 16, 1930 Patented May 4, 1937 UNITED STATES onnrme I Edward H. Angier, Framingham, Mass, assignor to Edward H. Angier, as trustee for Angler Laboratories Application May 16, 1930, Serial No. 453,001

- 19 Claims.

This invention relates to creping and the object is to provide novel and useful creped products and also a method whereby materials not hitherto susceptible of being creped may be made and whereby the manufacture of such products may be realized.

My invention may be well understood by reference to the following description taken in connection wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a fragment of a creped product, a portion being broken away; and

Fig. 2 is a diagram of one form of mechanism illustrating a preferred method by which the product of Fig.1 may be produced.

The practical and ornamental advantages of paper formed with the elastic and somewhat irregular crinklings characteristically recognized and named as crepingsare wellknown. Such paper may be produced by the well known roll and doctor methodwherein the paper stock, suitably moistened to reduce it to a partly pulpy 1 condition, is pressed into adherence with a smooth surfaced roll and while adhering to the roll crowded back upon itself in the act of removwith the accompanying drawing,

ing it from the roll by the action of a doctorblade. Materials which shed water either on account of the nature of the material itself or on account of its smooth surface or materials too tenuous to withstand the action of the doctor blade have not hitherto been known in creped form. An'example is material containing rubber or like gums and particularly rubberized cloth or cloth-reinforced sheet rubber consisting, for instance, of a web of muslin to which is applied a coating of rubber which impregnates the interstices of the weave and is firmly united,

thereto. An example of my invention is such a rubberized cloth having crepings entirely analogous to the crepings of kraft paper, and in Fig. 1- I have shown a fragment of such material broken away at one corner. to show the muslin and having the characteristic crepings into which the sheet as a whole, cloth and rubber 4 coating, is gathered as distinguished from reg 1'1- lar corrugations or an embossingv of the rubber coating alone.

Such material is not crepable alone, but in 50 accordance with my invention I am enabled to crepe it by associating it with crepable material, such as moist paper stock, preferably a web of paper, and creping the assembly. The assembled materials may thereafter be separated and when the auxiliary material utilized is in the form of,a web it becomes a useful and salable prodnot in and of itself. V

Referring to Fig. 2, I have there shown in a diagrammatic manner a creping machine for practising the well known roll and doctor creping method and embodying a creping roll 1 to which a web of material suitably prepared in the moistening tank 9 is led, herein around the cooperating roll H, and into firm adherence with which this web is pressed by a squeeze roll IS. The creping roll 'i may, if desired, be heated, as herein indicated by the showing of the steam pipe Hi. The doctor blade I! removes the web from the roll I and in so doing crowds the material back on itself while adhering to the surface of the roll, producing crepings. In the example of the invention herein shown a web i9 of kraft paper or the like is led through the tank 9 and deposited directly in contact with the roll I. The web 2| of rubberized cloth in the crude unvulcanized state, or other membranaceous material not in itself susceptible of creping, is deposited over the moist web 19 and both pressed firmly together and to the roll by squeeze roll I3. I have found that the paper adheres to the roll while the rubber cloth coheres to the surface of the paper throughout its area in such a manner'thatwhen the paper is creped by the action of thedoctor blade in the usual manner the rubber cloth is gathered upinto crepings with it. To insure the coherence of web 2| to web I9 I prefer to utilize a further web 23 of paper overlying the web 2| so that the latter is held between two crepable webs during the operation. Herein the overlying web is of duplex paper embodying two webs 23a and 23b secured together by an intervening layer of asphalt. I have herein shown the duplex web 23 as being prepared progressively asutilized in the creping process, the two webs 23a and 23b being led from suitable supply rolls and asphalt being applied to the face of one of them'by coating roll 25 running in a tank' of liquid asphalt, the two webs being pressed together by the squeeze rolls 2! and the duplex web led directly from these squeeze rolls to the creping mechanism.

The compound web, herein consisting of the three assembled-webs l9, 2i and 23, when removed in creped form from creping roll I by doctor lI, may pass through a drying chamber 29, herein diagrammatically indicated by the showing of steam pipes, to dry the webs l9 and 23, which may then be separated from web 2| and rolled up for use. In this drying operation the rubberized web may become partly vulcandoctor a web of material not in itself susceptible ized. It desirably is then led in festoons as shown through vulcanizing chamber St to complete its vulcanization and then may be rolled up for use, the crepings being rendered permanent by this treatment.

The product of the-process described as applied to uncured rubberized cloth has a wide range of elastic extensibility in both directions by virtue of the material of which it is composed. That is, it in and of itself has the characteristics of a rubber material. Moreover, because of the crepings into which the sheet is gathered it has an elasticity of form due to the expansion of these crepings. These crepings are permanent and will not be stretched out in ordinary use.

I am aware that the invention may be embodied in other'specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential attributes there- 'of, and I therefore desire the present embodiment to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive; reference being had to the appended claims rather than to the foregoing description to indicate the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. The method of creping by means of roll and of being so creped which comprises causing the web to adhere to a web of prepared paper, causing the paper web to adhere to the roll, creping the assembled webs and separating the webs.

2. The method of creping by means of roll and doctor a web of material not in itself susceptible of being so creped-which comprises confining the web between two paper webs in themselves adaptable to the process, creping the assembled webs and thereafter separating the same. 1

3. The method of creping a membranaceous hydrofuge tissue by means of roll and doctor characterimd by utilizing an intervening layer ofmoist paper stock as an adhesive medium to cause such tissue to adhere to the roll.

4. The method which comprises depositing on a smooth surfaced roll a moist web of paper,

depositing thereover a web of at least partly plastic hydrofuge material, pressing the assembly to the roll, crowding it back on itself to crepe stratum of moist crepable stock and subjecting it to the action of a creping doctor blade.

6. The method which comprises confining a membranaceous hydrofuge tissue between layers of paper creping the assemblage by roll and doctor and separating the tissue from the layers.

. 7. The method which comprises leading a moist web of paper stock over a roll, leading a web containing vulcanizable gum over the paper web, pressing the two together and against the roll, crowding the webs on the roll back on themselves to crepe the same, and heating the creped webs as they. lead from the roll to dry and cure the same respectively.

8. The method of creping a membranaceous hydrofuge material bymeans of roll and doctor which comprises interpwing between such ma-- 'terial and the roll a thickness of moisture-absorbing material and pressing said latter ma terial into adherence with the roll and said former material into coherence with the latter, crowding the layers back on themselves to efiect creping and separating the two materials.

9. The continuous method of making creped rubberized cloth or similar material which comprises leading a moist web of paper stock over a roll, leading a web containing vulcanizable gum over the paper web, pressing the two together and to the roll, crowding the webs on the roll back on themselves to crepe the same, drying the webs. as they lead from the roll, separating the dried web of paper from the gum-containing web and rewinding the same, and continuing the travel of the gum-containing web through a vulcanizing chamber wherein it is cured and at its exit therefrom disposing it for further use.

10. The method which comprises associating with a paper layer a textile fabric impregnated with a. vulcanizable gum, creping the assembled layers and curing the gum and separating the impregnated fabric and paper.

11. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a softflexible sheet material with vulcanizable rubber composition, rendering the sheet temporarily adherent and creping the same. 12. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet material with vulcanizable rubber composition, rendering the sheet temporarily adherent and creping the same upon the coated surface.

13. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet material with rubber, creping, and vuicanizing the same.

14. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet material with rubber, creping by removing the coated surface of the sheet from the creping cylinder and vulcanizing the same.

15. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet material with a vulcanizable rubber composition, creping, and subjecting the same to vulcanizing conditions.

16. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet material with a vulcanizable rubber composition, creping by removing the coated surface of the sheet from the creping cylinder, and subjecting the same to vulcanizing conditions.

17. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps coating a soft flexible sheet of cloth with vulcanizable rubber composition, rendering the sheet temporarily adherent and creping the same.

18. Method of making an elastic crepe, which comprises as steps, coating a soft flexible sheet I of cloth with rubber, creping, and vulcanizing the same.

CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION.

Patent No. 2,079,273; I Mav 4, 1937.

EDWARD H. ANGIER. I

It is hereby certified that the assignment in the above numbered patent was erroneously written and printed as "Edward H. Angier, as Trustee, for Angier Laboratories" whereas said assignment should have been written and printed as Edward H. Angier, of Framingham} Massachusetts, Trustee, under Agreement and Declaration of Trust dated July 23, 1931, designated as Angier Laboratories, as shown by the records of assignments in this office; and page 2, first column, line 50, claim 4, for "deplasticized" readdeplastioizing; and that the said Letters Patent should ,be read with these corrections therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office. r

Signed and sealed this 13th day of July, A. D. 1937;

Henry Van Arsdale (Seal) Acting Commissioner of Patents. 1

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2573773 *Nov 12, 1948Nov 6, 1951Cincinnati Ind IncExpansible cloth and method of making it
US2695653 *Feb 26, 1952Nov 30, 1954Cranston Print Works CoMethod and means for providing wrinkles in textile fabrics
US2704106 *Dec 30, 1950Mar 15, 1955Arkell Safety Bag CoMethod of making laminated material
US2947058 *Feb 7, 1956Aug 2, 1960Bleachers Ass LtdOrnamentation of sheet material
US2998983 *Oct 8, 1957Sep 5, 1961Scholl Mfg Co IncImprinting device
US4395451 *Jul 14, 1980Jul 26, 1983Althouse Victor ESemiconductor wafer and die handling method and means
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/152, 427/389.9, 428/175
International ClassificationB31F1/00, B31F1/12
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/12
European ClassificationB31F1/12