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Publication numberUS2079452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1937
Filing dateDec 7, 1935
Priority dateDec 7, 1935
Publication numberUS 2079452 A, US 2079452A, US-A-2079452, US2079452 A, US2079452A
InventorsHunter Hester W
Original AssigneeKimberly Clark Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning device
US 2079452 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 4, 1937. H. w. HUNTER CLEANING DEVICE Filed Dec. '7, 1935 Z n W@ W RX .1 w A n 5% M 6 5 m Patented May 4, 1937 CLEANING DEVICE Hester W. Hunter, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wis., a corporation of Delaware Application December 7, 1935, Serial No. 53,335

3 Claims.

My invention relates to an improvement in mops or cleaning devices and has for one purpose the provision of a mop or cleaner which shall be simple in operation, and convenient in use.

Another object is the provision of improved means for holding a removable roll or mop or cleaning element in position. Another object is the provision of improved means effective at the same time to hold a roll mop from unrolling,

and to hold a supporting core for said mop in place. Other objects will appear from time to time in the course of the specification and claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing, where- Figure 1 is a front elevation with parts in section;

Figure 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a front elevation of the mop holder proper with the refill and handle removed; and

Figure 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig- 25 ure 4.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawing.

Referring to the drawing, I generally indicates a unitary mop holding member, herein shown as 30 of sheet metal which includes a tubular shank, 2, a channel member 3, herein shown as approximately semi-circular in cross-section and lying below and at right angles to the shank 2. It may be connected thereto by the flange or web 5 4. 5 indicates any suitable spring structure. It

will be understood that I may employ spring stock or its equivalent for the entire member and the springs 5 may then be formed integrally with the above described parts. I illustrate, however, a single spring member passing through apertures 6 adjacent the bottom of the shank 2 and having turned ends 1 adapted to engage the mop as shown, for example, in Figure 3.

As a refill member or mop member, I illustrate a roll in, of any suitable material, for example,

paper or fiber, which is shown as rolled about a tubular core II. Under some circumstances and with some materials this tubular core may be omitted but in other circumstances, as with relatively soft or thin fiber rolls, it may be advantageous. The roll thus formed is provided with a slit generally indicated as I2 which extends in parallelism with the axis of the roll, and preferably at 55 one side only thereof. This slit increases radially outwardly in width, as will be clear from Figure 2, in order to permit the ready insertion of the member 3 therethrough. In use, the member 3 is inserted through the slit into the interior of the roll Ill, taking the position in which it is shown in Figure 2. An inner core or locking member 14 may then be inserted endwise through the open end of the tube. This core l4 conforms quite closely to the interior diameter of the member 3. In turn, the exterior diameter of the member 3 may conform quite closely to the interior of the tube l I. In use there will be sufficient play or tolerance to permit an easy insertion of the core 14, but the parts are preferably sufliciently close in their tolerances to prevent an unintended removal or shaking out of the core it. As the member 3 is inserted through the slot l2 into the position in which it is shown in Figure 2, the ends I of the spring 5 abut against the exterior of the roll it] and the spring is flexed until it takes the position shown in Figure 3. The spring therefore, serves as a holding means for preventing unintended relative movement of any of the parts and also for holding the loose edge l5 of the roll down against the rest of the roll. Thus the roll cannot become unrolled, but the pressure of the spring is insufficient to prevent the operator from readily withdrawing the edge l5 of the roll and taking 01f one layer of the exterior of the roll when it is desired to renew the exterior surface of the roll.

In order to provide a ready and easily shipped handle means for my mop I may employ three hollow tubes, paper or the like, indicated as 25, 2| and 22. These may be of paper, fiber or the like and may be of the same length and are preferably of the same exterior and interior diameter. In order to assemble the handle I illustrate two plugs 23, 26, which may be of wood and which conform closely to the interior diameter of the tubes 20, 2! and 22, sufiiciently closely so that a certain amount of pressure is necessary for assembly and so that the handle will not come unintentionally disconnected. The tubular shank 2 of the mop holder is preferably about the same diameter as one of the plugs 23 and it may be plugged into the end of the tube 29. It is shown as split and preferably has enough spring so that it will rather solidly hold its relationship to the tube 20 so that the parts will not become readily disassembled. Thus I provide a mop assembly in which the parts are light and easily packed and shipped but which may be assembled to make a stout, practical and usable mop.

It will be realized that whereas I have described and shown a practical and operative device, nevertheless many changes might be made in the size, shape, number and disposition of parts without departing from the spirit of my invention. I therefore wish my description anddrawing to be taken as in a broad sense illustrative and diagrammatic rather than as limiting me to my specific showing. I find the employment of the leaf springs 5 highly successful in at the same time holding the roll I Q or the loose end l5 from unrolling, while holding the parts together sufliciently snugly to prevent the longitudinal escape of the member Hi from the holder 3.

Where I employ the word core it will be understood that the core may be cylindrical or otherwise formed, and may be hollow or solid, and of any suitable material. The roll is shown as cylindrical but it will be understood that I do not wish to be limited to a cylindrical roll, as variations in the form of the roll may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Any suitable means may be employed to prevent unintended sliding or slipping of the core I4 in relation to the member 3. I illustrate, as in Figure 4, and in dotted line in Figure 3, notches 25 in which may be positioned any suitable member 25, for example an ordinary rubber band. This rubber band, as shown in Figure 5, rests against the inner and outer faces of the member 3; its contact with the member i4 is such that unintended longitudinal sliding of the member M in relation to the member 3 is rendered very unlikely, even if the thrust of the spring 5 is slight or entirely lacking.

However, the thrust of the spring 5 against the exterior of the roll ii! tends to increase the frictional contact between the member 26 and the interior of the roll, and in any event has a frictional effect on the exterior of the roll H] which is simultaneous with and supplements the frictional connection between the member 26 and the interior of the roll or its core II. The result is a firm locking action of the parts.

I claim:

1. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material, a hollow spindle about which said cleaning material is rolled, a core removably positioned within said spindle, a handle, a support associated with said handle and including a portion penetrating between said core and spindle, and frictional means on said penetrating portion, normally in simultaneous contact with said core and spindle.

2. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material, a hollow spindle about which said cleaning material is rolled, a core removably positioned within said spindle, a handle, a support associated with said handle and including a portion penetrating between said core and spindle, and a band of rubber mounted upon said penetrating portion, and normally in simultaneous contact with the surfaces of the hollow spindle and the core.

3. In a cleaning device, a roll of cleaning material, a hollow spindle about which said cleaning material is rolled, a core removably positioned within said spindle, a handle, a support associated with said handle and including a portion penetrating between said core and spindle, and frictional means on said penetrating portion, normally in simultaneous contact with both core and spindle, and additional means adapted simutlaneously to direct a thrust against the exterior of the roll.

HESTER W. HUNTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2452744 *Jun 6, 1945Nov 2, 1948John W GardnerFloor cleaning machine
US4471507 *May 27, 1983Sep 18, 1984Marvin SchwartzPaint brushes with detachable handles
US6810554 *Nov 16, 2001Nov 2, 2004Rapid Brands CorporationCleaning tool with removable cleaning sheets
US8464386Dec 2, 2011Jun 18, 2013Fernando GarciaFloor cleaning apparatus with integrated dispensing and containment rolls
US8555449Jan 5, 2011Oct 15, 2013Fernando GarciaFloor cleaning apparatus with integrated dispensing and containment rolls
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/231, 15/144.3, 15/104.2, 248/188.5
International ClassificationA47L13/24, A47L13/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/24
European ClassificationA47L13/24