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Publication numberUS2080683 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1937
Filing dateNov 22, 1934
Priority dateNov 22, 1934
Publication numberUS 2080683 A, US 2080683A, US-A-2080683, US2080683 A, US2080683A
InventorsYost Lloyd, George W Norris
Original AssigneeFairbanks Morse & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump construction
US 2080683 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 18, 1937. 1.. YOST ET AL PUMP CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 22, 1934 INVENTOR. LLOYD V057- GEORGE W NORRIS I ATTORNEY Patented May 18, 1937 FATE? PUMP CONSTRUCTION Lloyd Yost, Wilmette, Ill., and George W. Norris, San Francisco, Calif, assignors to Fairbanks, Morse & 00., Chicago, 1111., a corporation of Illinois Application November 22, 1934, Serial No. 754,200

3 Claims.

An object of the present invention is attained in the provision, in a pump-column assembly, of an improved structure for centering and supporting a pump shaft tube within the outer column, the structure being substantially selfcentering in a. column structure formed of commercially available pipe sections having the usual mill-production variations in dimensions.

Another object is to provide a greatly improved spider for the purpose noted, which includes a central portion or hub provided with a plurality of radially extending arms, the free ends of the arms being provided with resilient cushioning elements for engagement with the inner surface of the outer column. The cushioning elements engaging the column and carried by the arms of the spider, are arranged to permit the spider to center itself within the column, and substantlally to reduce the transmission of vibration from the shaft tube to the outer column.

A further object is to provide an improved spider for the purpose described, which is adapted to be assembled in a pump column without the usual securing expedients, such as screwing or clamping portions of the spider to the pump column.

Yet a further object is realized in the provision of a greatly improved column spider, which is adapted to be secured to a section of a shaft tube Without the necessity of machining the tube section prior to such assembly, this advantage and economy being made possible through the provision of a resilient bearing element disposed between the spider and the shaft tube.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following description and from the drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional elevation of a portion of a pump column assembly, illustrating one form of spider embodying improvements of the present invention, and Fig. 2 is a transverse section thereof, as vlewed'from line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

In the following description, suitable characters of reference will be employed to designate the several elements of the structures, and-cor responding elements will receive the same reference character.

Referring to the drawing, numerals ill and i l designate the end portions of adjoining pump column sections l2 and i3, the ends being, by

preference, externally threaded for engagement with an internally threaded coupling sleeve M. Disposed within the column assembly is a pump shaft tube structure l5 comprising tubular sections joined together in any suitable manner. As shown in Fig. l, the adjoining ends of adjacent tubular sections it and I? are secured in assembly by threaded engagement with a threaded tubular member is disposed internally of the tube sections. The member 58 may serve, in addition, as a bearing member for the pump shaft section 89.

In order properly to center the shaft tube as-- sembly it within the outer column, and to provide lateral support therefor, spacing members are, by preference, disposed at spaced'intervals along the shaft tube. Such a spacing member or spider is illustrated at 26, and it is this member of the pump column structure which embodies the improvements of the present invention. The spider may be formed of any suitable material possessing the required strength and rigidity, such as bronzeor cast iron.

As shown, the spider 29 includes a hub portion 2i adapted to surround, in sleeved relation, the shaft tube structure 05, and a plurality of radially extending arms 22. In the presently preferred example, the spider is provided with three such arms, the number of arms being a minimum consistent with a stable structure, whereby to facilitate a, self-centering of the member in the well column. It will also be observed from Fig. 2, that the lateral width of each arm is relatively small, in order to effect a skeleton structure and so reduce to a minimum obstruction of the-upward flow of water in the column. The free end of each arm is provided with a holder portion 23, which may be formed integrally with the arm. Formed in the portion 23, is a pocket 24 which is. by preference, of dovetail section, as shown. A cushion element 25 of rubber or other resilient material, is secured in the dovetail pocket, preferably by pressing the element therein, so that a portion thereof extends radially beyond the end of the portion 23, whereby the cushion element will frictionally engage, normally under a slight compression, the inner surface of the outer column. The size and resilience of the element 25 is so proportioned, according to the size of the spider to which it is to be assembled, as to effect a substantial frictional gripping action of the element upon the internal surface of the column. It will be clearly seen that, by reason of the spacing of the spider arms and the resilient elements 25, the spider is substantially self-centering, and hence in the assembled pump structure, the shaft tube will be centered within the outer column. It will be noted, 5 also, that the resilient elements 25 effect a cushioning action between the spider and the outer column, whereby the transmission of vibrations from the shaft tube structure to the column is substantially/reduced,, in comparison with rigid assemblies of corresponding parts.

As a presently preferred means for preventing the spider from moving or slipping down the column, one or more of the arms may be provided with an angulate finger or lug 26, the outer end portion 21 of which is adapted to be disposed between the adjacent ends of outer column sections l2 and I3, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 1.

The finger portion 26 rests upon the upper edge of column section l3, and the lower end of the adjacent column section I2 is, by preference.

spaced from the end of the lower column section a distance suflicient to prevent binding of the finger or fingers between the ends of the column sections.

The spider hub 2| is, by preference, provided with a bore 28 having a diameter substantially larger than that of the shaft tube l5 extending through the hub. Seated in the bore 28, is a resilient ring element or centering member 29, formed of rubber or other suitable resilient material. The centering element ispreferab'ly of such size as to require it to be compressed into assembly in the hub bore 28. In order to insure against displacement of the centering element, the hub is provided with a flange shoulder on each end thereof, in overlying relation to the ends of the centering element, whereby effectively to confine the centering element to this hub bore. In assembling the spider to the shaft tube structure IS, the tube section to which the spider is to be applied is inserted through the rubber centering member, which is thereby compressed about the tube to effect a firm securement thereof. The centering member being formed of a resilient material such as rubber, will absorb such vibrations as normally occur in the shaft tube structure during operation of the pump assembly.

From the foregoing description of a spider embodying the improvements of our invention, it readily may be seen that the improved spiders clearly attain the several objects enumerated hereinabove, and that a sturdy and compact spider structure is provided which is fully capable iii tions. As before described, the spider'arms are,

of a long life under all pump operating condiby preference, formed of minimum thickness, consistent with the, requisite strength, in order to reduce the obstruction to the upward flow of water in the well casing.

It will be understood, of course, that the embodiment of our invention herein described and illustrated may be altered or modified without departing from the spirit and intended scope of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In a pump, in combination with an outer casing, a pump shaft extending within the casing, a stationary tube enclosing said shaft, and means for centering said shaft tube within the casing, comprising a spacing member having a hub portion about said shaft tube, and a plurality of arms extending radially therefrom, resilient elements in the ends of said arms, adapted for frictional engagement with said casing, a resilient bearing member carried by said hub, for frictional engagement with said tube, and means carried by said arms adapted for engagement with a portion of said outer casing, for positioning said centering means along said shaft tube.

2.,In a pump, in combination with an outer casing, a pump shaft extending within the casing, a stationary tube enclosing said shaft, a tubecentering spider within the casing, including a skeleton spacing member having a hub portion about said shaft tube and a plurality of radial arms, rubber cushions interf'ltted to the ends of the arms and adapted for frictional engagement within the inner surface of the casing, a resilient bearing member carried by said hub for frictional engagement with saidtube, and means carried by said arms adapted for engagement with a portion of said outer casing for positioning said centering means along said tube.

3. In a pump, in combination with an outer casing, a pump shaft extending within the casing, a stationary tube enclosing said shaft, a tubecentering spider within the casing, including a skeleton spacing member having a hub portion about said shaft tube and a plurality of radial arms, rubber cushions projecting from the ends of the arms and adapted for frictional engagement within the inner surface of the casing, a rubber sleeve carried internally of said hub for frictional engagement with said tube, and a lug element carried by each of said arms, the lugs being spaced from said cushions, and adapted for engagement with a portion of said outer casing for positioning said centering means along said tube.

LLOYD YOST. GEORGE W. NORRIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2640427 *Jun 7, 1950Jun 2, 1953Domer Victor JTurbine pump
US2973996 *Jan 9, 1957Mar 7, 1961Samuel Self EdwardStabilizer for drill pipe
US3789598 *Oct 26, 1971Feb 5, 1974Whitin Machine WorksRoving frame bolster
US3807905 *May 4, 1972Apr 30, 1974Sigma LutinVertical pumping unit
US4280793 *Feb 23, 1979Jul 28, 1981Mono Pumps LimitedBore hole pumps
US5385454 *Apr 14, 1993Jan 31, 1995Ebara CorporationBearing device for use in a canned motor
US5567138 *Jun 26, 1995Oct 22, 1996Newton; HilleMethod and apparatus for limiting eccentric deviations of a rotating polished rod in rotary pumping applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification384/441, 384/220, 415/901
International ClassificationF04D29/04, F04D29/044
Cooperative ClassificationF04D29/044, Y10S415/901
European ClassificationF04D29/044