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Publication numberUS2080805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1937
Filing dateJun 25, 1935
Priority dateJun 25, 1935
Publication numberUS 2080805 A, US 2080805A, US-A-2080805, US2080805 A, US2080805A
InventorsBrey Clarence F
Original AssigneeBrey Clarence F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Necktie rack
US 2080805 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 18, 1937.

' INVENTOR: Curran/0a EBray,

ATTORNEYS.

Patented May18, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates to racks intended more particularly for neckties and similar articles.

The aim of my invention is to provide a simple and compact rack capable of accommodating a multiplicity of neckties or the like suspended in a row for convenience of ready selection between them, and with facility for easy insertion and removal individually without necessitating disturbance of any of the others.

One way in which the foregoing and other advantages may be readily realized in practice will appear from the following detailed description of the attached drawing, wherein Fig. I shows the front elevation of a necktie rack conveniently embodying the present improvements.

Fig. II is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale showing the front elevation of one end of the rack.

Fig. III is a cross section taken as indicated by the arrows IIIIII in Fig. II; and

Fig. IV is a view, partly in plan and partly in longitudinal section, taken as indicated by the arrows IVIV in Fig. H.

In the form illustrated, the necktie rack of my invention comprises two axially-aligned horizontal helices l and 2 fashioned from relatively stout spring wire; and an attaching bar 3 for supporting said helices, said bar being pierced adjacent its opposite ends for passage of screws 4 whereby the rack may be fastened to any vertical surface such as a wall or a door. The helix i, it will be noted, is of coarse pitch so that comparatively thick neckties T can be accommodated in a row between its convolutions; while the helix 2 is of a finer pitch to accommodate thinner ties T between its convolutions. Incident to placement in the rack, the ties T and T are doubled upon themselves and the two folds inserted edgewise respectively in two adjacent intervals of the helices i and 2. After being so engaged, the ties T and T' are given a quick downward pull as far as permitted by engagement of their folds or creases with the tops of the convolutions of the helices l and 2 intervening the extremities of said ties, and thereby leveled in the rack.

The attaching bar 3 is herein shown as being of composite construction, and as consisting of a pair of superimposed components 5 and 6 of narrow strip metal which are permanently united at their opposite ends by securing means in the form of screws I. The bar component 6 is laterally oiIset for the greater part of its length as at 8, with provision of a vertical longitudinal interval 9 in which the convolutions of the two helices I and 2 are firmly engaged at one side, see

ii respectively of the helices i and 2. By virtue of this construction, the coils l and 2 are constrained against rotation in the bar 3, while being permitted to expand and contract, as hereinbefore explained, within the limits of the slots l0, II, and II.

As an alternative, the two helices may be made as one from a single length of wire by controlling the winding such that a part of the coil is given a coarse pitch, and the remainder a closer pitch in simulation of the arrangement shown in Fig. I. In the latter event the intermediate slot II in the bar component 5 may be dispensed with, but the single coil provided with laterally turned ends (like those shown at l2 and I3 in Fig.1) to engage the slots i0 and Ii at the ends of said bar component. v

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have provided a simple, compact and inexpensive rack capable of supporting a row of suspended neckties or the like in definite separation and in close contiguity in such manner that they can be readily selected from and easily removed and inserted individually without disturbing any of the others.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A rack for neckties and the like comprising a horizontal helix of spring wire with convolutions spaced to receive between them relatively thick ties; a second helix, likewise of spring wire, but with closer spaced convolutions for reception between them of relatively thin ties; and means for supporting the two helices in axial alignment with capacity for independent endwise expansion and contraction.

2. A rack for neckties and the like in accordance with claim 1, wherein the supporting means is in the form of a bar with a vertical longitudinal slot in which the convolutions of the two helices are slidingly engaged at one side.

3. A rack for neckties and the like in accordance with claim 1, wherein the supporting means is in the form of a bar with a vertical longitudinal slot in which the convolutions of the two helices areslidingly engaged at one side, and with short horizontal slots respectively at the ends and at an intermediate point for engagement by laterally turned end portions of the coils.

4. A rack for neckties and the like comprisinm two horizontal coil sections of spring wire forming a helix, one with convolutions spaced laterally for reception between them of relatively thick ties, and the other with closer spaced convolutions for reception between them of relatively thin ties; means for supporting the helix with capacity to expand and contract endwise; and a supporting bar with a vertical longitudinal interval in which the convolutions oi the helix are slidingly engaged at one side.

5. A- rack for neckties and the like comprising two horizontal coil sections of spring wire forming a helix, one with convolutions spaced laterally for reception between them of relatively thick ties, and the other with closer spaced convolutions for reception between them of relatively thin ties; means for supporting the helix with capacity to expand and contract endwise; and a supporting bar with a vertical longitudinal interval in which the convolutions of the helix are slidingly engaged at one side, said bar also having longitudinal slots in which laterally turned end portions of the helix are engaged with capacity for limited movement-to permit lengthwise expansion oi the sections.

CLARENCE I". BREY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454879 *Aug 16, 1944Nov 30, 1948Joseph Mattingly BenjaminFishing tackle
US2511730 *Apr 9, 1948Jun 13, 1950Mcclain Harry AHolder and file for photographic slides
US2619233 *Feb 25, 1947Nov 25, 1952Technicon International LtdSlide filing means
US2663114 *Feb 15, 1951Dec 22, 1953Warner Leonard CFishing leader holder
US2708061 *Dec 9, 1952May 10, 1955Kotchka JamesBall holder
US2756946 *Jan 14, 1954Jul 31, 1956Mcauley Robert EFishing leader holder and receptacle
US2913125 *May 21, 1954Nov 17, 1959Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpArticle holder
US5201430 *Jan 13, 1992Apr 13, 1993Advent Medico, Inc.Instrument holder
US20120187059 *Jan 21, 2011Jul 26, 2012Salvatore SistoSpiral towel rack
EP2633786A1 *Feb 27, 2013Sep 4, 2013Anastasia A. BatzakidouSpiral hanger
WO1999056596A2 *Apr 30, 1999Nov 11, 1999Bernerth Hans TorstenBlade holder, especially a knife holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/120, 211/89.1, 43/57.1
International ClassificationA47G25/74, A47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/746
European ClassificationA47G25/74D