Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2081029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1937
Filing dateDec 13, 1933
Priority dateDec 13, 1933
Publication numberUS 2081029 A, US 2081029A, US-A-2081029, US2081029 A, US2081029A
InventorsYoung Arthur
Original AssigneeYoung Arthur
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid carbonator and dispenser
US 2081029 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 18, 1937. A. YOUNG LIQUID CARBONATOR AND DISPENSER Filed Dec. 13, 1953 INVENTOR A ORNEY Patented May I8, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BCIaims.

This invention relates to beverage machines, and is particularly directed to a device for, and process of carbonating liquids and dispensing the same.

An object of this invention is to provide a device of the character described for carbonating liquid and dispensing the same and including means for spraying the liquid during the carbonating process.

A further object of this invention is .to provide a device of the character described having atomizing means for injecting carbon dioxide into the liquid to beacarbonated.

Another object of this invention is to provide a highly improved process of carbonating'liquid which shall be simple to carry. out and produce a highly palatable, thoroughly saturated liquid.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a compact and rugged apparatus of the character described, which shall be comparatively inexpensive to manufacture, economical to use, easy to manipulate, smooth and positive in operation, and withal practical and eflicient to a high degree.

Other objects of this invention will in part be obvious and in part hereinafter pointed out.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described, and of which the scope of application will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawing, in which is shown one of the various possible illustrative embodiments of this invention,

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of apparatus embodying the invention in cross-section;

Fig. 2 is a partial elevational view of a modified construction with parts in cross-section; and

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view, partly cross sectioned, of an apparatus illustrating another modified construction.

Referring now in detail to the drawing, I8 designates an apparatus embodying the invention for carbonating liquid and dispensing the same. Saidapparatus comprises a tank ll, having a bottom wall l2, a cylindrical wall l3 and being closed by a cover I 4 at the top, bolted or screwed thereto. The cover I4 is formed with a central opening l5. Supported by said cover I4 is a member l6 having a tubular portion I! extend ing through the opening l5 and forming a tight joint therewith. At the bottom end of the tubular portion H is a shower or spray head l8 located adjacent the top of the tank i I and having a bottom wall l9 formed with a plurality of small perforations 28.

For the purpose hereinafter appearing, the bottom wall- I! of the spray head is formed with a central opening 2|. Extending from the tubular portion I! is a horizontal pipe 22 provided with a one way check valve 28; and extending from the pipe portion 22 is a vertical downwardly extending pipe 25 open at the bottom end thereof and projecting into a supply tank 28. The pipe portion 25 is provided with a hand valve 25a exteriorly of tank 28. The tank or vessel 28 may have a tube closed by a cap 21 in the top wall thereof and is provided with an inlet pipe 28 controlled by a hand valve 29. The pipe 28 may be connected to any suitable supply 01' gas or air pressure.

Extending through the opening 2| in the bottomwall ISofthespmhead l8,isapipe open at the bottom end 3| thereof somewhat above the bottom wall l2 0! the tank ll. tends axially through the pipe l1 and projects through an opening 33 formed at the top of said pipe I'I. Extending from the pipe 38 is a faucet or nozzle 35 provided with a hand valve 88. Extending within the pipe 38 axially thereof, is a smaller pipe 31 at the lower end, of which there is provided an inverted spray head 310 located adjacent to said bottom wall I 2. Said spray head is formed with a top wall 38 provided with a plurality of perforations 38. The top wall 88 may be located just below the bottom open end 8| of the pipe 88. The pipe 81 extends through suitable openings 48 and 4| in the tubes or pipes 80 and I1, respectively, and is connected to any suitable supply of carbon dioxide gas. A one way check valve 43 and a hand valve 44 may be interposed in the pipe 81 exteriorly of the tank II.

The top cover l4 of the tank ll may be provided with a gauge 45 for measuring pressure within said tank and with a pet cock 48.

The operation of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1 will now be described. A supply of liquid, such as milk, is poured into the tank 28 by removing the cap 21. The cap 21 is then closed, as is also the valve 25a, and gas admitted through the pipe 28 by opening the valve 28 until a suflicient pressure head is obtained at the top of the tank 26 above the liquid. The valve 29 is then closed. Carbon dioxide gas is then admitted to the pipe 31 by opening the valve 44, the gas passing to the spray head 31a being sprayed through the apertures 39 and passing through the tank I l and escaping through the pet cock 48 which is opened, thus creating a current of carbon dioxide The-pipe 88 ex-' Y suitable period. Thereafter,

thereto. u pet cook 58 and is formed with a central opening gas within the tank H and at the same time expelling the air that may be contained therein. The valve 25a may then be opened to permit the liquid within the tank 26 to be siphoned to the spray head IS. The liquid is then sprayed through the apertures into the tank H. The liquid being sprayed into the tank is very effectively and efliciently deaerated and carbonated as it comes into contact with the medium of carbon dioxide.

During the above operation the valve 36 is closed. This operation may be continued for some period until the tank H has a desired quantity of liquid therein. When suihcient liquid has been fed to the tank, the valve a may be closed. If desired, carbon dioxide may still be fed for any the pet cock 46 is closed and carbon dioxide fed to the tank under any predetermined pressure that may be desired to carbonate the liquid. Any surplus gas will collect above the surface of the liquid and at the top of the tank II and will act as a pressure head for dispensing the carbonated liquid upon opening of the valve 36. The carbonated liquid will then pass upwardly between the tubes and 31, through-the nozzle or faucet 35.

It will be noted that the liquid is not agitated with my improved process, which is therefore particularly suitable for carbonating milk, coagulation or formation of cream or butter being effectively prevented. It will be understood, however, that other liquids besides milk may be carbonated and dispensed with my improved method and apparatus.

In Fig. 2 there is shown a modified form of apparatus Illa. Hie apparatus Illa comprises a tank 52 having a cylindrical wall 53 to the bottom end of which there is screwed a bottom wall 54. Adjacent the bottom of the cylindrical wall 53 may be located an outlet faucet 55 provided with a valve 56. The top of the cylindrical wall 53 may be closed by a cover 51, screwed or bolted The cover 51 may be provided with a Extending through said opening 59 is a chamber 60 having a cylindrical portion and a ,cpnical wall 6| at the bottom end thereof communicating with an axial pipe 62, at the bottom end of which there is provided a plate 63. The peripheral portion 64 of said plate may be attached to the bottom edge of the cylindrical wall 53 by the bottom wall 54. Said plate 63 may be formed with a plurality of perforations or small openings 66 for the purpose hereinafter set forth.

Extending from the member 60 exteriorly of the tank 52 is a pipe 61 connected to any suitable supply of carbon dioxide gas. The vessel 60 may furthermore beformed with a top wall 68 having a central opening 68. Extending through said opening 69 and fixed to said top wall 68 is a ves sel 10 having a cylindrical wall'll and a conical wall l2 concentric with the member 60. The conical wall 12 is formed with an opening 13 at the bottom end thereof located adjacent the top end of the pipe 62. The vessel 10 is furthermore provided with a top wall 15 having a tubular screw threaded inlet opening 16 to which there may be screwed a cap 11.

Said top wall 75 is furthermore formed with an axial or central tubular internally screw threaded portion 86 and screwed within said opening is a stem 8| having a handle 82 at the top end thereof. A packing joint 83 serves to prevent leakage between the stem 8| and the tubular member 66. At the bottom end thereof,

said stem Si is provided with a conical valve head 85 adapted to close the opening 18 at the bottom end of the conical wall 12. The operation of the device shown in Fig. 3 will now be described.

Liquid such as milk is inserted in the chamber 10 through the tubular opening 16. During this time, the'valve stem II has been screwed in such position that the valve head 85 closes the opening 13. The valve 56 is also closed during this operation. The valve contr g the pipe 61 may then be opened to feed carbon dioxide gas through said pipe and between the members Ill and 66, the carbon dioxide gas passing to the pipe 62 and into the chamber formed between the plate 63 and the bottom wall. through the apertures 54 and into the tank. The valve stem 6| may then be turned to unseat the valve head 85 and permit liquid to pass downwardly through the opening 13. The carbon dioxide gas flowing past the opening 13, mixes with the liquid, producing an atomizing efl'ect and thoroughly carbonating the liquid. The liquid and gas then pass through the pipe 62 into the chamber below the plate 53 and through the apertures 66 into the tank.

After a suitable quantity of liquid has been exhausted from the tank 16, the valve 6| may be turned to closing position. The carbon dioxide gas may, however, be continued to be fed for any suitable length of time. The pet cock 58 should be open during the abovepperation to permit a free circulation of the gas and expel all the air in the tank.

The pet cock may then be closed and the carbon dioxide gas fed for a further period under any predetermined increased pressure. Surplus pressure will produce a pressure head at the top of the tank. Thereafter, the supply of carbon dioxide gas may be shut and the carbonated liquid dispensed by opening the valve 56. Liquid may be fed under pressure to vessel 10 in same manner as the liquid is fed as shown in Fig. 1. l I

In Fig. 3 there is shown a modified form of carbonating device llb. The device llb comprises a tank 95 having an externally screw threaded lower edge portion "a. Screwed to said screw threaded portion 90a is a bottom cover 92 having an internally screw threaded flange 93 screwed to said screw threaded edge 90a. There is also clamped to the lower edge of the tank 90 by said cover 92, a dome-shaped plate 9| disposed within said tank and having the edges thereof clamped to the lower edge "a by said bottom cover 92. The top of the tank may be formed with a neck having a central opening provided with a suitable packing joint. Extending through the opening in the neck 95 is a tubular member 96 extending out of the tank and having a nozzle or faucet portion provided with a faucet valve 96a.

Fixed within the tank 90 adjacent the top thereof is an annular member 9'! of curved crosssection, having the edges thereof fixed to the inner surfaces of the tank and forming therewith an annular chamber. The member 91 may be formed with a. plurality of small perforations 98. Extending from the tank 66 is a pipe 99 communicating with the chamber formed by the curved plate 91. The pipe 56 may be provided with a one way check valve llll and a hand controlled valve Ill and may be connected to any suitable supply of liquid to be carbonated. There may also be attached to the upper end of the tank 9| a pipe I42 carrying a The gas passes upwardly pet cook it! and a pressure gauge I. There may be inserted within the chamber formed between the bottom cover 92 and the dome-shaped plate 9| a piece of frozen carbon dioxide I05.

The operation of the device will now be described. The liquid passes from the pipe 99 into the annular chamber formed by the plate 91. The liquid is then sprayed into the tank by passing through the apertures 98. The piece of frozen carbon dioxide or dry ice may be inserted within the tank by first removing the cover plate 92 and placing the block of dry ice on said cover and then screwing the cover to the bottom of the tank for clamping the plate Si in position. As the dry ice evaporates or gasifies, the carbon dioxide gas will pass through the apertures in the plate 9| for carbonating the liquid sprayed into the tank through the apertures 98. During this operation, the pet cock i3 is preferably open to permit a free current of carbon dioxide gas to pass through the tank and to eliminate the air within the tank. when the desired amount of liquid has been sprayed into the tank, the supply of liquid may be closed by operating the valve IOI. Thereafter the pet cock I03 may be closed to permit a pressure head to be built up at the top of the tank. The arbonated liquid may then be siphoned and dispensed fromthe tank by opening the valve 96a. The term liquid used in this specification is intended to cover all liquid, semi-liquid, plastic and pasty materials, for example creams, such as ice-cream, custards, and the like substances.

It will thus be seen that there is provided a device and method in which the several objects of this invention are achieved, and which is well adapted to meet the conditions of practical use.

As various possible embodiments might be made of g the above invention, and as various changes might be made in the embodiments set forth, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawin: is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. In combination a tank, a spray head at the top of the tank having a bottom apertured wall, means for feeding liquid to said spray head comprising a tube partially in said tank communicating with said top spray head, a spray head at the bottom of the tank having a top apertured wall, means for feeding carbon dioxide gas to said second mentioned spray head comprising a second tube partialLv in said tank communicating with said bottom spray head, and a third tube extending into said tank and terminating in an open end adjacent the bottom of the tank, said second tube being disposed within said third tube, and a faucet connected to the upper end of said third member exterlorly of said tank.

2. In combination a tank, a spray head in the tank having an apertured wall, means for feeding liquid to said spray head comprising a tube partially in said tank communicating with said spray head, another spray head in the tank having an apertured wall, means for feeding carbon dioxide gas to said second mentioned spray head comprising a second tube partially in said tank communicating with said second spray head, a third tube extending into said tank and terminating in an open end adjacent the bottom of the tank said second tank being disposed axially within said third tube, and said tank having a pet cock adjacent the top thereof.

3. In combination a tank, a tubular member extending into the tank through the top thereof and connected to a liquid supply, a spray head at the lower end of said tubular member, a second tubular member extending into said tank disposed within said first tubular member and terminating in an open end adjacent the bottom of the tank, a faucet connected to the upper end of said second tubular member, exteriorly of-said tank, and means for feeding carbon dioxide gas to said tank, said last named means comprising a third tubular member axially disposed within said second tubular member.

4. A tank having a bottom wall and a cylindrical side wall, a cover adapted to serve as a top wall for said tank, a central opening in said cover, a member on said cover-having a tubular portion extending through said opening and forming a tight joint therewith, a spray head in said tank disposed adjacent said cover and communicating with said tubular portion, means for supplying a liquid to said tubular portion, a second spray head, means for supplying a gas to said second spray head comprising a second tube, and a third tube having an open end thereof disposed adjacent said bottom wall and having adjacent the other end thereof a dispensing nozzle, said second tube being disposed axially within said third tube.

5. The method of deaerating and carbonating a liquid which consists of placing a chamber in communication with the atmosphere throughan open vent, spraying said liquid into said chamber, so directing a current of carbon dioxide at a pressure slightly above atmospheric, into said chamber and through said spray as to remove the air from the liquid and sweep said air from the chamber through the open vent, then closing said vent, and continuing to pass/carbon dioxide into said chamber through the liquid accumulated therein until a predetermined pressure is reached.

6. The method of preparing a beverage for dispensing, which consists of placing a vessel provided with a valved discharge tube in communication with the atmosphere' through an open vent, closing the valve in said discharge tube, spraying a liquid into said vessel, so directing a current of carbon dioxide at a pressure slightly above atmospheric into said, vessel and through said spray as to remove the air from the liquid and sweep said air from the vessel through the ARTHUR YOUNG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463915 *Apr 24, 1944Mar 8, 1949Beatrice Creamery CompanyProcess of making butter
US2589728 *Oct 18, 1947Mar 18, 1952Pratt Edmond OPneumatically operated irrigating apparatus
US2782016 *Jun 11, 1954Feb 19, 1957Frank M IannelliCarbonating apparatus
US2808246 *May 27, 1954Oct 1, 1957Chambers Alexander MGas-liquid contact device
US3266672 *Mar 6, 1964Aug 16, 1966Gordon B DeanBeverage dispenser with carbonator
US3291463 *Dec 26, 1963Dec 13, 1966Kartridg Pak CoApparatus for charging a liquid with a gas
US3637197 *Jan 12, 1968Jan 25, 1972James L HudsonGas charger for liquids
US4043771 *Feb 23, 1976Aug 23, 1977Linde AktiengesellschaftMethod of and apparatus for the dissolution of gases in liquids
US4265376 *May 16, 1979May 5, 1981Skidell Seymour SBeverage carbonation and dispensing container
US5217621 *Dec 18, 1991Jun 8, 1993Liquid Carbonic Industries CorporationCarbonization of liquid
US5736072 *Oct 10, 1996Apr 7, 1998Sanden CorporationDevice for producing carbonated water
US6601833 *May 23, 2001Aug 5, 2003Shiga PrefectureContainer for sparkling beverage and bubble generating means
Classifications
U.S. Classification95/255, 261/DIG.700, 261/122.1, 96/202, 261/117
International ClassificationB01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB01F3/04808, Y10S261/07, B01F3/04751, B67D1/0057, B01F2003/049, B01F3/0473
European ClassificationB67D1/00H4, B01F3/04C6A4, B01F3/04C8G, B01F3/04C6