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Publication numberUS2081823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1937
Filing dateNov 6, 1935
Priority dateNov 6, 1935
Publication numberUS 2081823 A, US 2081823A, US-A-2081823, US2081823 A, US2081823A
InventorsLudwig Kunz
Original AssigneeLudwig Kunz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nonrefillable bottle stopper
US 2081823 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 25, 1937. KUNZ NONREFILLABLE BOTTLE STOPPER Filed Nov. 6, 1955 llzzdw 'y ATTORNEY Patented May 25, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFEQE 2,081,823 7 NONREFILLABLE BOTTLE STOPPER Ludwig Kunz, New York, N. Y. Application November 6, 1935, Serial No. 48,561

3 Claims.

The present invention relates to a new and improved non-refillable bottle stopper.

It is the primary object of the invention to provide a construction that will effectively prevent the refilling of a bottle after the original contents have been exhausted. Resorting to the use of extraneous means, such as wire, pressure, holding in any position, or the like, will only result in an unsuccessful attempt to refill the bottle.

A further object of the invention resides in constructing a stopper that will prevent the refilling of the bottle and at the same time permit the contents thereof to flow out in an even manner until contents are entirely exhaused. By the use of the present invention there is very little if any possibility of the contents spilling over the sides of the bottle or being discharged in an uneven manner as is the case with devices of this character in present day use.

Another object of the invention resides in the special shape and contour of the outflow section, which construction prevents the contents of the bottle from dripping down along the neck of the bottle, thus maintaining the same in a clean and sanitary condition at all times.

A still further object of the invention is to construct a non-refillable bottle stopper of glass, porcelain or other suitable material and of any desired size, that is simple and inexpensive to manufacture, neat in appearance and easy to assemble, yet when in position in a bottle may not be removed without mutilating the neck of the bottle or the stopper.

Broadly, the invention may be defined as comprising a stopper constructed of two halves and having a pair of channels in each half with means for permitting the outflow of liquid from within the bottle while effectively preventing the bottle from becoming refilled. This construction and arrangement will be hereinafter more completely described.

The invention will be fully and comprehensively understood from a consideration of the following detailed description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing which forms part of the application.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating the stopper in fixed position within the neck portion of the bottle.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating the bottle in inverted position for dispensing the liquid from within the bottle.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the stopper.

Fig. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the interlocking halves in separate position comprising the stopper; and

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view illustrating in dotted lines the path followed by the liquid when being dispensed from the bottle and the air inlet.

Referring to the drawing wherein like or similar characters refer to like parts, indicates a bottle of the usual type provided with a neck or discharging portion 8 adapted to receive the new and improved stopper indicated generally by the numeral 9. It will be noted that the stopper 9 is constructed of two sections I and H which, when joined together, present a substantially unitary construction. Each of the sections have fiat confronting faces with similar and co-related parts for a purpose to be later described.

Referring to Fig. l, it will be noted that the section It is provided with channels 12 and i3 having substantially S-shaped upper end portions and the section I l with corresponding channels l4 and 15. Each of the channels present a sinuous passage which will permit the outflow of the liquid from within the bottle and at the same time prevent the bottle from becoming refilled. The channels I2 and 14 of the sections ill and II, respectively, are provided with the shoulder portions it which will prevent access tothe balls and the refilling of the bottle and at the same time permit the liquid from within the bottle to flow outwardly in an even and uninterrupted manner. The lower ends of the channels i2 and I3 are so formed as to provide chambers having ball valves l1 and I8 movable therein and said chambers are provided with seats for the reception of the balls I1 and i8. When the bottle is inverted, as illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawing, the balls I1 and I8 will roll forwardly and be displaced a degree suficient to allow the outflow of the liquid from the channel l2 and the entrance of air thru the channel 13, the ball [1, however, will roll forward and be displaced prior to the ball E8. The liquid will start to flow and, as soon as the ball i8 has been displaced, air will enter the bottle thru the channel l5, thus assuring a steady, even flow of the liquid. It is to be noted that the lower part of the channel l3 and the corresponding channel l project to a point beyond the body portion of the sections with an edge thereof contacting the neck of the bottle. This construction and arrangement allows for an uninterrupted passage of the incoming air which is highly important in order to O ranged in the confronting faces for 'allow for a free and uninterrupted flow of the liduid.

It can be readily understood that if it were possible by an extraneous means to hold the balls in the position illustrated in Fig. 2 that the bottle could be refilled. However, due to the provision of the shoulders within the channels this is a physical impossibility. It is highly improbable that a wire or other means could be so curved as to slide within the channels and hold the balls away from their normal position. Any pressure thru either of the channels will press the balls firmly against their seat and displace a minimum amount of the contents of the bottle thru the channels.

The lower ends of the sections l0 and H are beveled as at l9 to give added assurance to the liquid flowing in an even manner until the entire contents are exhausted. It is believed that this can readily be determined from the drawing.

For maintaining the sections in a locked position there is provided the flanges 20 and 2| of the section H) which fit within corresponding recesses 22 and 23 of the section II. The sections are further united by the use of a cork gasket 24 which fits within and is retained by the channel 25 of the stopper 9. The cork gasket 24 serves further as a locking medium for retaining the stopper within the neck of the bottle.

After the stopper is placed in position within the bottle a further sealing means, such as a usual screw cap 26, may be used.

It is understood that the improvement is capable of extending application and that changes may be made in the construction described as do not affect the spirit of the invention nor exceed the scope thereof as expressed in the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is:

1. A non-refillable bottle stopper comprising a pair of sections having flat confronting faces, means for securing the sections together to provide a body for frictionally fitting within the neck of 'a bottle, spaced sinuous channels having substantially S-shaped upper end portions and arcooperation to provide a relatively large outlet passage and a small air inlet passage, each passage extending through the ends of the body and provided with chambers at the lower ends thereof having restricted upper and lower ends providing valve seats, the upper seat of the chamber of the outlet passage disposed substantially centrally of the body and the lower seat eccentrically thereof, to provide a lateral pocket, ball valves movable in the chambers and received by the seats for closing the passages, the outlet passage having an outwardly flared lower end for directing liquid thereto and the upper end thereof being directed laterally to extend adjacent to one edge of the upper end of the body, and the inlet passage extending below the outlet passage and having a restricted lower end directed at a downward lateral inclination with an edge thereof contacting the neck of the bottle.

2. A non-refillable bottle stopper comprising a pair of substantially semi-cylindrical sections having flat confronting faces, flanges formed on the face of one section and recesses in the face of the other section to receive the flanges for interlocking the sections together to provide a body for frictionally fitting within the neck of a bottle, spaced sinuous channels arranged in the confronting faces and cooperating to provide a relatively large outlet passage and a small air inlet passage, each passage extending through the ends of the body and provided with chambers at the lower ends thereof having valve seats, ball valves movable in the chambers and received by the seats for restricted lower end directed at a downward lateral inclination, with an edge thereof contacta pair of substantially semi-cylindrical sections of the other section to receive the flanges for interlocking the sections together to provide a l body for frictionally fitting within the neck of a bottle, a gasket surrounding and countersunk in the body to provide a leak proof connection between the body and neck, spaced sinuous channels arranged in the confronting faces and cooperating to provide a relatively large outlet passage and a small air inlet passage, each passage extending through the ends of the body and provided with chambers at the lower ends thereof having valve seats, a projection rising from. the top of the body and having the passages extending therethrough, ball valves movable in the chambers and received by the seats for closing the passages, the outlet passages having an outwardly flared lower end for to, the inlet passage extending below the outlet passage and having a restricted lower end directed at a downward lateral inclination with an edge thereof contacting the neck of the bottle, and said passages being substantially disposed upon opposite sides of the center of the body and being parallel with each other.

LUDWIG KUN Z closing the passages, the outlet stopper comprising directingliquid therer

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5232110 *Dec 4, 1991Aug 3, 1993Purnell Peter FContainer closure
US20140319178 *Apr 25, 2013Oct 30, 2014Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc.Container Fitment
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/17, 215/309, 215/312
International ClassificationB65D49/10, B65D49/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D49/10
European ClassificationB65D49/10