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Publication numberUS2082537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1937
Filing dateDec 14, 1935
Priority dateDec 15, 1934
Publication numberUS 2082537 A, US 2082537A, US-A-2082537, US2082537 A, US2082537A
InventorsMontagu Butler Guy
Original AssigneeMontagu Butler Guy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Running and like athletic shoe
US 2082537 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1, 1937. e. M. BUTLER RUNNING AND LIKE ATHLETIC SHOE Filed D90. 14, 1935 v INVENTOR G. M. BUTLER W a/z ATTORNEY Patented June 1, 1937 UNITED. STATES PATENT OFFICE Application December 14, 1935, Serial No. 54,362 In Great Britain December 15, 1934 4 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in running and like athletic shoes.

An essential feature of a running shoe to which my invention is specially applicable, is that it must be an accurate and close fit to the foot since otherwise when in use, there will be a tendency for it to slip on the foot.

Mainly for this reason it has been necessary in order to obtain a well fitting shoe to have it made entirely by hand to precise measurements which increases the expense more especially if several pairs of shoes are required as is often the case when running under different conditions and on diiferenttracks.

The object of the present invention is to provide a running shoe capable of manufacture in standard sizes which can be quickly put on and adjusted to the necessary close fit and which moreover can be adapted for use under varying conditions and on different types of track.

The invention consists of a running or like athletic shoe having an elastic insertion at the top of its heel end and, in addition to the usual lacing or closure means for the front, straps attached to the sole adapted to be adjustably secured in yielding tension across the instep of the foot.

A further feature of the invention in its application to a running shoe is the provision of a removable and interchangeable spike carrying plate adapted to be inserted into the shoe so that the spikes protrude through openings in the sole of the shoe.

In order thatmthe invention may be more 5 readily understood reference is hereby made to the accompanying. drawing wherein is illustrated a shoe constructed in accordance with the invention.

In this drawing Figure 1 is a side elevation,

partly in section, of the improved shoe, Figure 2 is an enlarged longitudinal section through a portion of the sole of the shoe, Figure 3 is a plan of the interchangeable spike carrying plates and Figure 4 is a rear view of the shoe.

Referring to this drawing the numeral l designates the body of the shoe which is made of light flexible but inextensible material such, for example, as soft leather and is in the example shown provided'with laces at the front in the usual manner. The rear end 2 of the shoe is shaped to embrace the heel of the wearer in such a manner that the heel, when the shoe has been a put on, is housed in a concave recess and in order to ensure close fitting a triangular shaped elastic gusset 3 is provided. This elastic gusset prevents any abrading movement of the shoe and moreov tends to hold the shoe as a whole firmly on the foot. A flexible tongue 4 is provided preferably having a flap 5. Attached to the underside of the instep of the sole a pair of straps 6 are provided one of these straps 6 being provided with an adjusting buckle of any conventional form. These straps are attached between the sole and the body or upper of the shoe and it is essential that the attachment is such that the straps are free except for the attachment to the sole. That is to say they are not attached in any way to the sides of the upper or body of the shoe.

A rubber insertion 9 is provided in one of the straps.

The sole of the shoe is provided with holes Ill and spike carrying plates ll of steel or other sufiiciently strong flexible material with spikes rigidly attached are provided and adapted to be introduced into the shoe so that the spikes pass through the holes. These spikes are secured to the plate, and a facing l2 of thin leather or like material is adhesively applied to the inner surface of the plate and upon this leather foundation a pad l3 of sponge rubber or other suitable soft material is applied by means of a suitable adhesive although the sponge rubber may be attached directly to the metal plate. The inside surface of the outer sole is also preferably provided'with a thin rubber insole M into which the washers or enlargements l5 at the upper ends of the spikes tend to bed when the sole is in use thus preventing the entrance of grit through the holes in the shoe sole. Alternatively much the same effect may be attained by applying a gasket to the underside of the metal plate.

When the shoe is used for field events it is desirable to have spikes also in the heels and in this case a spike carrying plate of similar construction and arrangement but of different shape may be provided as indicated in the drawing but for a shoe purely for running these heel spikes are unnecessary and may be omitted.

As before indicated for different types and conditions of track different lengths of spike are desirable and it is proposed to provide interchangeable spike carrying plates ll so that one plate can be substituted for another as and when required.

In operation the shoe, after the appropriate spike plate has been inserted in position is put on in the usual way and is then laced up to a comfortable degree of tightness. The side straps 6 are then buckled together until the elastic insertion 9 is properly tensioned. As an alternative to lacing a zip-fastener can be employed but this will necessitate elastic insertions on one or both sides of the front of the shoe.

It will be found that a shoe constructed in the foregoing manner can be made in standard sizes, will be of light weight and can be adjusted to flt the foot perfectly, the side straps giving adequate support where it is required. This is an important feature of my invention and affords support which has hitherto not been attained in' any running shoe within my knowledge. It should also be understood that although primarily intended as a running shoe the construction will be advantageous for other athletic shoes such as tennis shoes in which case of course a sole of appropriate form and material will be provided and the spike plate eliminated.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A running shoe comprising an upper, an outer sole attached to said upper and having holes therein, a flexible metal plate removably and interchangeably engaged in the shoe, metal spikes attached to said metal plate, said spikes being located so as to register with the holes in the outer sole, a yielding insole interposed between the inner surface of the outer sole and the flexible metal plate through which the spikes pass, and a yielding pad of soft material arranged over the top surface ofv the flexible metat plate.

2. A running shoe comprising an upper, an outer sole attached to said upper and having holes therein, a flexible metal plate removably and interchangeably engaged in the shoe, metal spikes riveted to said metal plate, said spikes being located so as to register with the holes in the outer sole, a yielding insole interposed between the inner surface of the outer sole and the flexible metal plate through which the spikes pass, and a yielding pad of soft material arranged over the top surface of the flexible metal plate and having holes therein to accommodate the rivet heads of said spikes.

3.'A running shoe comprising an upper, an

outer sole attached to said upper and having holes therein, a flexible metal plate removably and interchangeably engaged in the shoe, metal spikes attached to said metal plate, said spikes being located so as to register with the holes in the outer sole, a yielding insole interposed between the inner surface of the outer sole and the flexible metal plate through which the spikes pass, a yielding pad of soft material arranged over the top surface of the flexible metal plate, and a leather facing adhesively attached to the metal plate upon which said yielding pad is adhesively attached.

4. A running shoe comprising an upper, an outer sole attached to said upper and having holes therein, a flexible metal plate removably and interchangeably engaged in the shoe, metal shouldered spikes attached to said metal plate, said spikes being located so as to register with the holes in the outer sole, a yielding insole interposed between the, inner surface of the outer sole and the flexible metal plate through which the spikes pass and into which the shoulders of said spikes imbed, and a yielding pad of soft material arranged over the top surface of the flexible metal plate.

GUY MONTAGU BUTLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2902780 *Mar 12, 1957Sep 8, 1959Bellew Bernard ASport shoe
US3410005 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 12, 1968Ro Search IncGolf shoe
US4079527 *Aug 31, 1977Mar 21, 1978Antonious A JShoe
US4561197 *May 3, 1985Dec 31, 1985Colgate-Palmolive CompanyGolf shoe sole structures for relieving spike-produced pressure points
US6895693Dec 28, 2001May 24, 2005Leo's Dancewear Inc.Dance shoe
US7386945Oct 30, 2003Jun 17, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Sole for increased circulation
US7406781 *Feb 23, 2005Aug 5, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7730637Jun 30, 2008Jun 8, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7752775Sep 11, 2006Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 23, 2007Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US8209883Jul 8, 2010Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8245418 *Mar 1, 2008Aug 21, 2012Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US8567096May 2, 2011Oct 29, 2013Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US20030121176 *Dec 28, 2001Jul 3, 2003Leo's Dancewear Inc.Dance shoe
US20050091881 *Oct 30, 2003May 5, 2005Reebok International Ltd.Sole for increased circulation
US20050198868 *Feb 23, 2005Sep 15, 2005Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US20070017125 *Sep 25, 2006Jan 25, 2007Jennings James ECleat/spike insole shoe
US20080263904 *Jun 30, 2008Oct 30, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular Shoe
US20090217552 *Mar 1, 2008Sep 3, 2009Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US20100212192 *Apr 29, 2010Aug 26, 2010Wolfgang ScholzModular Shoe
US20110203142 *May 2, 2011Aug 25, 2011Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US20140237850 *Feb 22, 2013Aug 28, 2014Nike, Inc.Footwear With Reactive Layers
US20150282554 *Apr 6, 2015Oct 8, 2015Ryan IrionBarefoot running spikes and accessories
USD283364Jan 17, 1983Apr 15, 1986Kangaroos U.S.A. Inc.Athletic shoe
USRE32585 *Dec 30, 1983Feb 2, 1988 Adjustable and flexible closure assembly for shoes with variable opening
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/129, 36/67.00B, 36/134, 36/28, 36/51, 36/107
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/06
European ClassificationA43B5/06