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Publication numberUS2082599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1937
Filing dateNov 6, 1933
Priority dateNov 6, 1933
Publication numberUS 2082599 A, US 2082599A, US-A-2082599, US2082599 A, US2082599A
InventorsLester T Sawyer
Original AssigneeLester T Sawyer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical dressing
US 2082599 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1937- L. T. SAWYER SURGICAL DRESSING Filed Nov. 6, 1933 2 She'ets-Sheet 1 FIG. 3

' INVENTOR LESTER r SAM/YER 0.x! ATTO N June 1, 1937. 'r. SAWYER SURGICAL DRESSING Filed Nov. 6, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR LESTER 7. SAM/YER & 2 Afi'bRNEY Patented June 1, 1937 UNITED. STATES PATENT oFFlcE S URGICAL DRESSING Lester T. Sawyer, Fitchburg, Mass. Application November 6, 1933, Serial No. 696,846 4 Claims. (Cl. 128-268) This invention relates to surgical bandages.

The general object of the invention is to provide a bandage easy to apply, easy to fix in position, economical as to both cost and quantity 5 required to be used and capable of being removed with ease and without painingthe bandaged person.

Heretofore strips of elastic raw rubber have been suggested for use in bandaging perhaps because of their capability of adhering surface to surface without adhering to the skin of the user. Objects of my invention are to provide in a surgical bandage not only the quality of adhering surface to surface without being capable of adhering to the skin of the wearer but also the quality of substantial inelasticity whereby the bandaged part may be held firmly without the necessity of being subjected to undesired constant compression from elasticity; also the quality of partial porosity; and also the quality of cost economy.

In carrying out the objects of my invention I use a base fabric strip of open mesh textile having interstices between the meshes of substantial size. This textile fabric strip may preferably be Woven cotton or linen gauze bandaging. It is my desire that this strip be rendered commercially permanently capable of adhering to itself, layer upon layer, without the ability to adhere to the skin or the hair of the user and without closing the interstices so that the greatly desired ventilation be maintained in the finished bandage when in use. In carrying out this object more is required than the application of a coating of cement. Practically all cements either on account of their viscosity either fiow into and fill the interstices of the strip and, or shortly change so as to lose their quality of cohesion.

At first I was of the impression that a coating of latex upon the textile fabric strip would impart to it in combination the qualities of my present invention. I discovered that latex in the form of a thin coating, even when protected on one side by a sheet of metal, in a few days lost its quality of tackiness or ability to adhere surface to surface. This deterioration as to this quality was present in a larger degree when latex alone was used as a coating for the threads of a textile fabric strip.

In carrying out my invention I not only employ the strength and flat lying quality of a textile fabric strip but I employ a subcoating of fixing gum-like material which closely adheres to the threads of the textile fabric strip and which 55 in addition has the quality of fixing the quality of tackiness for a super-imposed coating of unvulcanied latex. This fixing subcoating may take any one of several forms. I have discovered that a subcoating formed by two thin sheets of vulcanized latex pressure rolled into place is 5 suitable. I have also found that a coating of vulcanized latex in emulsion or solution from which the solvent has been removed after the coating has been applied is also suitable. I have also. found that the subcoating may take the 10 form of an applied coating of a volatile solvent solution of synthetic resin such as either an acetone or carbon tetrachloride solution of phenol resin.

The above and further objects of my invention 15 are pointed out in the accompanying claims, which are directed to illustrative embodiments of the invention described in the specification and shown in the accompanying drawings solely for the purpose of illustration and not limitation. 20

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic perspective of a roll of my bandage; Fig. 2 is a view of a finger to which my bandage has been applied; Fig. 3 is a finger illustrating the use of my bandage to render useful the use of an elastic 25 rubber intermediate portion; Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic plan view, drawn to an enlarged scale, of a fractional portion of my bandage; Fig. 5 is a cross-section drawn to the same scale as Fig. 4 and Fig. 6 is a greatly enlarged cross- 30 section showing the relation of L1e coatings to the threads of my fabric base.

Interwoven crossing threads i and 2 have an open mesh leaving interstices 3 of a substantial size are preferably employed in the form of 35 strips, either the desired width of the finished bandage in the first instance or of a wider width capable of being cut into narrower strips.

I first apply a subcoating 4 of a fixing gumlike substance which adheres firmly to the threads I and 2. This subcoating must have at least two qualities. Besides thatof adhering to the threads I and 2, it must have the quality of substantial non-viscosity so as to stay on the threads and not spread and bridge across the 45 interstices 3; and it must have the quality of preserving or fixing substantially permanently stickiness or tackiness for a super-imposed coating 5 of unvulcanized latex. I I have-found at leastthree suitable embodiments for the subcoating 4- having this fixing capability or quality. It may comprise a coating of vulcanized latex such as that described in United States Letters Patent No. 1,682,857, granted Sept. 4, 1928, to Philip Schidrowitz.

This

which are preferably resilient as by being covered with a thick vulcanized rubber layer. By this expedient the subcoating l is eliminated from the interstices 3 and squeezed firmly into and onto the threads. I and 2 solely, the interstices .being left open. I have also found that I may employ for this subcoating 4 a solution in some volatile solvent, such as acetone or carbon tetra-' chloride, of phenol resin. This phenol resin subcoating may be applied by immersion and the elimination of the solvent by evaporation.

Any of the above associations used to give long life to the exposed or' outer unvulcanized latex properly may be termed an age resisting agent.

In connection with all three forms which I have described for this subcoating 4 it should be noted that they are each either substantially" white or substantially colorless or only faintly colored so that I may actually either tint this subcoating with suitable dye or coloring matter the desired fiesh color and/or similarly tint the white textile fabric strip the same desired flesh color without having this flesh color masked by a nonalterable color such as black or dark brown which is a concomitant of most adhesive coatings.

After the application of my fixing subcoating I super-impose a super or finishing coating of unvulcanized latex causing it to adhere firmly to the subcoating 4. This may be done by immersion in latex emulsion and drying or by doubling by rolls similar to those previously described of two thin sheets of unvulcanized latex. In applying this outer coating 5 the meshes 3 are left open so as to impart or preserve the ventilating qualities for the finished strip A which is shown in a roll E in Fig. 1, 'it being understood that the end of the roll F is exaggerated in that the strip rolls surface to surface without spacing and not spaced as shown.

In the use of my bandage any suitable absorbent material such as a strip of gauze may first be applied to the injured part such as finger 6; then a few turns of my special bandage holds the absorbent material in place and the final laps I and 8 adhering together, the under side of 1 to the outer side of lap 8 terminates the bandaging and automatically holds the bandage in position.

In Fig. 3 the elastic rubber piece of bandage B is applied tothe finger 6 and its tendency to roll up is eliminated by applying the edge anchorages C andD ofmy inextensible non-rolling bandage which imparts suflicient rigidity to the end portions of the elastic rubber B to hold it in place despitethe bending of the finger knuckle.

If'desired, I may tint my final coating of unvulcanized latex any desired color such as flesh color orv I may rely on the showing through this thin latex the color of the subcoating and of theunderlying color of the textile strip. It is to be understood that I may sterilize or medicate in any. approved manner either my finished bandage or the various portions, textile strip, subcoating and supercoating, as the fabricationprogresses.

aosasao What I claim and desire by United States Letters Patent is:

l.-A surgical bandage characterized by the fact that both sides of it are closely adherent one to another and are both free from the capability of adhering to the skin of the wearer and comprising an open mesh textile fabric base and a thin closely adhering coating of unvulcanized latex leaving most of the interstices of said open mesh textile fabric mesh open for purposes of ventilation when the bandage is in use; an underlayer of an age resisting agent rendering said coating of latex long enduring as to the quality of tackiness with the capability of causing said bandage to adhere surface to surface as to the bandage itself but without the capability of adhering to the skin and hair of the user.

2. A surgical bandage characterized by the fact that both sides of it are closely adherent one to another and are both free from the capability of adhering to the skin of the wearer and comprising an open mesh textile fabric base having interstices of substantial size, a subcoating on both sides of said textile fabric base of a fixing gum-like substance having the quality of imparting to latex long enduring cohesion, leaving most of said interstices open and serving as a fixing medium for unvulcanized latex; and an outer coating of tacky unvulcanized latex closely adhering to said subcoating of fixing gum-like substance, also leaving said interstices of said textile fabric base open and fixed substantially permanently by said subcoating in position and in the quality of adhering to itself without adhering to the skin and the hair of the user.

3. A surgical bandage characterized by the fact that both sides of it are closely adherent one to anotherand are both free from the capability of adhering to the skin of the wearer and comprising an open mesh textile fabric base having interstices of substantial size, a subcoating on both sides of said textile fabric base of vulcanized latex, leaving most of said interstices open and serving as a fixing medium for unvulcanized latex; and an outer coating of tacky unvulcanized latex closely adhering to said subcoating of vulcanized latex, also leaving said interstices of said textile fabric base open and fixed substantially permanently by said subcoating in position and in the quality of adhering to itself without adhering to the skin and the hair of the user. i

4. A cohesive surgical bandage comprising an open mesh textile fabric base havingan incorporated substantially waterproof coating, at least the outer surface portion of which waterproof coating consists of unvulcanized latex; an age resisting agent included in said waterproof coating for maintaining tackiness for said unvulcanized latex; which coating leaves most of the interstices of said open mesh textile fabric open for purposes of ventilation; and said bandage being characterized by the fact that both sides of said bandage are closely adherent one to another and are both freefrom' the capability of adhering to the skin of the wearer and by the further fact that the capability of adhering to itself of said bandage is an enduring quality.

LESTER T. SAWYER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2540247 *Aug 15, 1946Feb 6, 1951Dillon John RWrinkle treating device
US2560712 *Mar 11, 1949Jul 17, 1951Lewis B BellBandage for varicose ulcer treatment
US2646796 *Feb 2, 1950Jul 28, 1953Scholl William MSelf-bonding tubular bandage
US2703573 *Dec 28, 1951Mar 8, 1955Gen Bandages IncFlexible coated sheet material
US2755196 *Aug 1, 1952Jul 17, 1956William M SchollMethod of making adhesive tape with clear margins
US2856919 *Feb 3, 1954Oct 21, 1958Alan E MurrayProcess of making splints
US4820279 *Mar 31, 1986Apr 11, 1989Dedo Richard GArticle and method for prepping a patient prior to surgery
US5599283 *Apr 25, 1995Feb 4, 1997Lindenmeyer; Carl W.Orthopedic appliance retainer
WO2012050448A1Oct 14, 2011Apr 19, 2012Emrcare B.V.Method for producing a cohesive surgical dressing
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/77, 139/420.00R, 602/62, 604/307, 428/131, 442/37, 139/426.00R, 604/308
International ClassificationA61F13/02, A61F13/56, A61F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2013/00102, A61F2013/00238, A61F13/58, A61F13/0273
European ClassificationA61F13/02H