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Publication numberUS2085807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1937
Filing dateOct 11, 1933
Priority dateOct 11, 1933
Publication numberUS 2085807 A, US 2085807A, US-A-2085807, US2085807 A, US2085807A
InventorsWilliam D Lindsey
Original AssigneeSealand Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Signal system
US 2085807 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. D. LINDSEY SIGNAL SYSTEM Filed Oct. ll, 1935 2 Shets-Sheet l vul/vvv f y INVENTR William D. Lindsey.

ATTORNEYS.

July 6, 1937. w. D. LINDSEY 2,085,807

S IGNAL SYSTEM Filed Oct.. l1. 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet? INVENTOR William D. Lindsey.

BY ma im? ATTORNEY Patented July 6, 1937 site SEGNAL SYSTEM Application october n, icas, serial No. 693,053

s claims.

The invention herein disclosed relates to a signaling system and in particular to a system in which Various directional signals are actuated for the purpose of directing a course of procedure. In many instances it is desirable to direct the course of action of people. rIhis is particularly true in such cases as the evacuation of a building in which a dangerous condition exists. For example, upon the existence of a rire in a building it is important and desirable that the building be evacuated as quickly as possible. In order to do this most eiciently, it is necessary to direct'the course of action of the occupants of the building. Such direction should include continuous inforl5 mation as to the passages to be followed in order to reach the exit and where there ismore than one way in which the occupants may leave the building, it is very desirable that the direction of their movements in evacuating the building be 20' through that passage and towards that exit which is away from the re.

By the invention herein disclosed, there is provided a series of directional signals which may be used to indicate the direction it is desired that 25 people take under certain conditions. The signals are automatically operated, upon the existence of a condition dangerous to people in a particular vicinity, to indicate the direction in which the people should take to avoid the danger.

30 For example, in accordance with the invention,

these directional signs may be used in conjunction with a re alarm system for the purpose of directing the evacuation of the building upon the existence of a re. In such a system the building 35 is divided into a number of Zones and there are signals placed in all passageways of the building so that there is a signal visible from every point in every passageway. 'Ihese directional signals are automatically illuminated to direct the occu- 40 pants of the building towards that exit away from the lire. With such signals there would normally be an orderly evacuation of the building and the chances of a panic occurring are greatlyreduced. The directional signals are electrically 45 controlled and may be electrically supervised. Normally the signals are connected such that upon theoperation of the system for the purposes of initiating a signal to indicate the existence of the iire, the directional signals are sim- 50 ultaneously operated.

In one system which forms an embodiment of this invention and which is particularly adapted for directing the evacuation of a building upon the existence of a fire, there is included special 55 exit signs and directional signals. The eXit signs (ci. rrr-955) are two-compartment signs. On the face of one compartment there is the normal green exit sign with an arrow, and on the face of the other compartment there is a stop sign. These exit signs are provided for installation at the entrance to each stairway on each floor of the building. Each stairway that may be used for an exit becomes the center of a vertical zone or section of the building. In. each exit sign there is a light for illuminating the sign. Normally the light in the compartment which carries the stop sign is not illuminated. In the compartment carrying the exit sign, there is, in accordance with this speciiic system, two lights, one which operates from a storage battery and the other which operates from the 110 volt supply in the building. The battery-operated light is provided in case of failure ofthe 110 volt supply and is automatically lighted when thellO volt supply fails.. In conjunction with these exit signs there is used a series of directional signs which include two arrows on the face thereof pointing-in opposite directions. Each arrow is illuminated by a separate and distinct light. If the distance between stairways and halls in the building is such that a stairway indicator is not readily visible from rany and all points inthe hall, one or more of these double arrow boxes are mounted in the hall. The double arrow boxes are preferably such in number and location that one double arrow box or a stairway indicator is visible from each and every point in the exit passage. f

Normally, thelights in the directional boxes and thelights in the stop compartment of the exit box and the'light served by the battery in the exit compartment are electrically supervised to insure that they are always in proper condition for operation. The supervision of these lights includes a series circuit which includes the lights and a source of electrical energy, the battery. The resistance in the series circuit is such that the lights are not illuminated by the current flowing therethrough. Upon the existance of a condition which requires theillumination of these At the sametime the lights in the directional arrow boxes behind the arrows which would point away from this Zone are also shifted to a parallel connection so that they are illuminated and serve as a visual directional signal directing people away from the zone and towards another zone and exit. The controls for the directional signal boxes of the several zonesare interconnected for the proper operation of these directional signals. The supervisedV circuits including the lights include co-ntrol means which when the circuit 'is broken for any reason such, for example, as a burned outI lament in one of the lights, operates to initiate a signal both locally vand remotely that upon operation indicates trouble existing in the particular circuit which it designates.

Such a system is illustrated in the accompanying drawings and a detailed description of this system is given below from which the exact operation of the specific system may be ascertained.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a front elevation of an exit signal box;

Fig. 2 is an elevation of the same with the front plate removed;

Fig. Sis a iront elevation of a directional signal box; V

Fig. 4 is an elevation of the same with `the front cover removed; and

Fig. 5 is a wiring diagram of the system in which these are used.

The front and rear plates la and Ib of the exit signal or stairway indicator I are each divided transversely at the longitudinal center and have cut therethrough the word Stop at one side of the dividing line and the word Exit with a downwardlyY or laterally pointing arrow at the. other side. VI'he opening forming the word Stop is covered by a red lter screen, and the opening forming the word Exit and the arrow are covered with a green filter screen. The interior of the sign is divided into two compartments in accordance with the division of the plates. One compartment Ic is enclosed by that portion of the plates Ia andV Ib having the word "Stop thereon, and the other compartment Id enclosed by that portion of the plates Ia and Ib having the exit sign thereon. Within the compartment I d there is mounted two sockets 2 and 3 which receive electric light bulbs 4 and 5 respectively. In the compartment Ic that is covered by the stop sign there is a signal light socket E which receives an electric light 1. The electric lights t and 1 are thirty-two volt lights and the electric light 5 is a 110`volt light.

The directional signal 8 shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is a box-like structure and has;a front cover plate 8a which is divided longitudinally at the transverse center and has an opening on each side of the longitudinal dividing line which openings are covered with a green lter screen. These arrows are parallel to one another and in the assembled and mounted sign lie one above the other. The interior of the signal is divided into two compartments by a partition wall 8b which forms the dividing line between the directional arrows in the iront cover plate 8a. .In the upper compartment there is the light socket 9 which carries a light I0, and inthe lower compartment there is a socket II whichcarries a light I2. The lights I and I2 are for the purpose of illuminating the compartments and rendering the arrows visible .by virtue of the illumination behind the arrow-like openings. Y f

The` system in which these signal boxes are used .is illustrated in Fig. 5. In installing this system Veach stairway that may be used for an cated between the stairways there is mounted:

the directional signals. The number and location of these directional signals on any particular floor should be such that there is a directional signal visible from every point of every passageway on the iioor. If this condition exists with respect to the stairway indicators, that is, if all stairway indicators are visible from every point of every passage on a particular iioor there is not thel'necessity for the directional signal because these directional signals are for the purpose of guiding the occupants to the stairway indicators. When so mounted, the signals are connected up in accordance with the system illustrated in Fig. 5. This system illustrates the connection of the signals of a single zone and their interconnection with the electrical control of another Zone.

In the system illustrated, there is utilized two current supplies, the ordinary 110 volt supply for illuminating the lights in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators, and a thirty-two volt supply represented by a battery for illuminating the lamps and 'I of the stairway indicators and thellamps II) and I I of the directional signals.

This thirty-two volt battery also supplies the supervisory current for supervising these latter lamps and the circuits thereto. The lights 5 are normally illuminated to indicate the exit from the building. Upon `the failure of the 110 volt supply, the emergency lamps 4 in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators are lighted.

Y The exitcornpartment lights 5 are supplied with current at 110 volts from connectors Illa and I4b which connectors are connected to and represent an A. C. supply of current at 110 volts. This 110 volt supply to the lamps 5 of the exit comparty'I'he relay I5 is connected in series with the 110 volt supply circuit and it is normally energized and acts as a supervisory relay. From this relay the 110 volt circuit is continued by a conductor A3 which is connected to the relay and which constitutes a line wire for supplying the several lamps 5 of the stairway indicators. The other feed vwire. A4 included in this 110 volt circuit is connected to a movable contact on the relay I5 which cooperates with a contact I5d and to which it normally is connected. The contacts |50 and Id connect together the conductor A4 and a conductor A5 which with the conductor A3 constitute the line wires for supplying the stairway indicators. In the system illustrated there are three-such stairway indicators Il, I8 and I9. The lamp 5 of the indicator Il is connected through a branch circuit including the conductors aI and a2 to the lines A3 and A5. A similar branch circuit including the conductors-a3 and a4 connects the lamp 5 of the indicator I8, and conductors a5 and c6 connect the lamp 5 of the indicator I9, the several lamps being connected in parallel to the lines A3 and A5. Through this circuit to the volt lamps 5 of the stairway indicator signs, the exit signs of the stairway indicators are continuously illuminated and appear green in color.

As heretofore stated, the lamps 4 in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators are provided for emergency purposes, particularly in the event of the failure of the 110 volt supply. These lights are normally connectedin a closed circuit with a' thirty-two volt battery 20 and a supervisory relay 2 I The several lamps are connected in a series circuit so that the resistance through the circuit is such that the current flowing therethrough is insufficient to illuminate the lamps; it is, however, suflicient to maintain the relay 2l operated. This circuit includes the positive and negative line wires BI and B2 which are supplied with current Yfrom the battery Eil through connectors Zta and 2Gb. A conductor B3 connects a connector 22a, on a panel 23 on which the connectors 28a and 2th are mounted, with the positive line wire Bi. The connector 22a is connected by a conductor B4 to one side of the thirty-two volt lamp in the exit compartment of the stairway indicator Il and the other side of the lamp is connected by a conductor B5 to a connector 22h mounted adjacent the connector 22a on the panel. The connector 22h is connected to another. connector 22o by a conductor B. The connector 22o is also connected by a conductor B'l to one side of the lamp in the exit compartment oi the stairway indicator I8. The other side ci the lamp in the exit compartment of this stairway indicator is connected by a conductor B3 to a connector 22d which is also connected by a conductor B9 to a connector 22e which is connected by a conductor- Bill to one side of the thirty-two volt lamp in the exit compartment of the sign it. The other side of the lamp in the compartment of this stairway indicator is connected through a conductor BH to a contacter 22j which is also connected through a conductor B82 to one side of the relay 2l. The other side of the relay 2l is connected through a conductor Bit to the negative wire B2. It will thus be seen that there is a closed series circuit including the source of energy represented by the battery 26, the three lamps in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators il, it and I9 corresponding to the lamp ll in the indicator i, and the relay 2 i.

The relay 2l has two pairs of cooperating fixed and movable contacts 2id and 2lb and 2te and 2id. These contacts are normally separated but become engaged upon the opening of the series circuit just described and the deenergization of the relay 2i, and they control an individual, iinmediate local signal and a remote general signal for the purpose of indicating'trouble in this circuit. The local signal is specific to the particular circuit and the remote signal is general to the stairway indicators and directional signals and is located on the main panel of the system in which these directional signals form a part. It is to be noted that the filaments of the'lamps form a part of the circuit and consequently the lamps are supervised.

A similar series circuit includes the thirty-two volt lamps in the stop compartment of the stair- Way indicators which correspond to the lamps l of the indicator i, the battery 2t and the supervisory relay 2G. This circuit includes the positive wire BI, a conductor CI which connects the conductor BI and a connector 25a, a conductor C2 which connects the connector 25a and one side of the lamp'in the stop compartment of the stairwayindicator I9, a conductor C3 which connects the other vside of the lamp and a connector 25h, a conductor connecting the connector 25h and a connector 25o, a conductorC connecting the connector 25e and one side or the light in the stop compartment of the stairwayl indicator I8, a conductor C6 connecting the other side of the light, and a connector 25d, a conductor C'I which connects the connector 25d and a connector 25e, a conductor C8 connecting the connector 25e and one side of the lamp in the stop compartment of the stairway indicator l1, a conductor CIU connecting the other side of the' lamp in the stop compartment of this stairway indicator with a connector Eiif, a conductor CII connecting the connector 25J with one side of the relay 24 and a conductor CH2 connecting the other side of the relay 2li with theconductor BIS. The relay 24 also has two pair of fixed and movable contacts 24a andZb and 2te and 24d. These fixed and movable cooperating contacts are normally held out of engagement by the energized relay 24. Theyjcontrol an immediate signal speciiic to the particular circuit, andthe remote general signal.

Similar circuits include the lamps in the double v arrow directional boxes 26, 21 and l28 which form a part of the portion of the system allocated to the zone illustrated in the drawings. These directional arrow boxes'aremounted in the passageways of the building so that the arrows arel one above the other. As heretofore stated the boxes making up the casings of these signs are divided longitudinally into two compartments and in each compartment there is a separate in- Y dividual light.`

' The series circuit to the lights in the upper compartments of the siz boxes 26, 2l and 28,

which illuminate and render visible the arrows pointing away from the stairwayexit indicated by the stairway indicators, includes a supervisory relay 29. This circuit is made upof the positive line wire Bl, a conductor DI which connects the positive line wire BI to a connector Stia, aconductor D2 connecting the connector Sila andone side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 26, a conductor D3 connecting the other side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 26 to a connector 30h,

a conductor Dit connecting-the 'connector 30h and a connector 30o, a conductor'D co-nnecting the connector 3Go with one side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 21 a conductor Dt connecting the other side of the lamp in the upper compartment of the sign 21 l with a connector 3M, a conductorD'I connecting the connector 30d and the connector 30e, a conductor D53 connecting the connector 30e and one side of the light in the upper compartment of the sign 23, a conductor D9 connecting the other side of thelight in the upper compartment of the sign 28 with a connector 30j, a conductor Dill connecting the connector 36j and one side of the relay 29,- and a conductor DII connecting the other side of the relay to the conductor Dit.Y The relay 29 also includes two pair of fixe-d and movable contacts 29a-29b and 29e- 29d which control a specific, immediate trouble signal and the remote general signal.

The series circuit to the lights in the lower compartments of the signs 26, 21 and 2B which illuminate an arrow pointing towards the exit indicated by the exit signs and a supervisory relay 3! for these lights is completed through conein' nectors 32a `to 32f inclusive. This circuit includes the positive line Wire BI, a conductor-El connecting line wire BI to the connector 32a, a conductor E2 connecting the connector 32a with one side of the lamp in the lower compartment of the sign 28, a conductor E3 connecting the other side of the lamp. in the lower compartment of the sign 28 with the'connector 32D, a conductor E4 connecting Athe connectors 32h and 32o, a conductor E5 connecting the connector 32e with one side of the lamp in the lower compartment of the sign 21, a conductor E6 connecting the other side of this lamp to the connector 32d, a conductor E1 connecting the connectors 32d and 32e, a rconductor E8 connecting the connector 32e and one side of the light in the lower compartment of the sign 26, a conductor E3 connecting the other side of the light in the lower compartment of this sign with the connecto-r 32f, a conductor Eli) connecting the connector 32f to one side of the relay 2| and aconductor Ell connecting the other side of the relay to the conductor B I 3. The relay 3| like the other supervisory relays has twov pairs of cooperating xed and movable contacts 3la and 3lb and 3|c and 31d which control an immediate specific signal and the remote general signal.

The change in the connection of the several groups of lights from a series to a parallel connection is controlled in each instance by a relay. The connection of the lights in the exit compartment of the stairway indicators is changed from series to parallel by the operation of a relay 33. The relay 33 has three pairs of cooperating xed and movable contacts 33o-33h, 33o-33d and 33e-33j which are brought into engagement upon the operation of the relay and which upon becoming engaged change the connection from a series to a parallel connection. 'I'he movable contacts 33h and 33d of the relay 33 are connected to the negative line wire B2V and the movable contact 33f is connected to the positive line wire Bi. The three fixed contacts 33a and 33e which cooperate with the movable contacts 33h and 33d and the fixed contact 33e which cooperates with the movable contact 33j are connected to the connectors 22e, 22e and 22j respectively. The contact 33a `and the connector 22e are connected by a conductor FI. The contact 3312 is connected by a conductor F2 to the connector 22j and the contact 33e is vconnected by a conductor F3 to the contacter 22e. Thus upon the operation of the relay 33 the connectors 22a, 22d and 22e will be connected to the positive side of the battery and the connectors 22h, 22o

and 22j will be connected to the negative side `of the battery. The several lights in the exit compartments will therefore be connected in parallel with the battery.

The lights in the stop .compartment of the stairway indicato-r signs are similarlyconnected in parallel upon the operation of a relay 34. The relay Se has three pairs of fixed and movable contacts 36o-34h, 36o-34d, and`34e-34f which upon engagement connect the lights in the stop compartments in parallel. The movable contacts 34h and 34d are connected by a conductor Gl tothe negative line wire B2 and the movable contact 34j is connected by a wire G2 to the positive line wire Bl. 'I'he stationary Contacts 34a, 34h and 34e are connected respectivelyto conductorsV G3, G4 and G5 which are respectively connected to connectors 25e and 25h, connector 25j and connectors 25d and 25e. Upon the operation `of the relay and the closing of these three-pairs of Iixed'and movable contacts it will be apparent that the contactors 251, 25h and 25o will be connected to the negative side of the battery through the conductor Gl and the line wire B2 and the connectors 25a, 25d and 25e will be connected to the positive side of the battery through the conductors G5, G2 and the line wire BI. The lamps Vin the stop compartment will therefore be connected in parallel with the battery and will be illuminated upon the operation of the relay 34. The lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals 26, 21 and 28 are controlled by a relay ,35 in the same manner as the lights in the stop compartment are controlled by the relay 34. The relay 35 has three lXed contacts 35a, 35e and 35e which cooperate respectively'with the movable contacts 35h, 35d and 351. The movable contacts 35o and 35d are connected to the negative line wire B2 and the movable contact 35j is connected to the positive line wire Bl. The three fixed contacts 35a, 35c and 35e are respectively connected to the connectors 36h and 30e, 30f and 30d, and 30e by the respective contactors HI, H2 and'H3. From this arrangement it will be observed that upon the operation of the relay 35 the connectors 30h, 30e and 30j will be connected to the negative side of the battery and the connectors 35a, 30d and 36e will be connected to the positive side of the battery. Thus, the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals will be illuminated.

The lights in the lower compartments of the directional signals 26, 21 and-28 are controlled by a relay 36. This relay includes movable contacts 36o and 36d which are connected in common to the negativeY line wire B2 and a mov-able contact 36fwhichis connected to the positive line wire Bl. AThese three movable contacts cooperate respectively with stationary and Xed contacts 36a, 36e and 36e. The fixed contacts 36a, 36C and 36e, which are engaged by the movable contacts upon the energization of the relay 35, are respectively connected through conductors Il, I2 and I3 to the common connectors'32b and 32e, the conductor El i), which isl connected to the connector 36f, and the common connectors 32d and 32e. In this case, the engagement ofthe fixed and movable contacts of the relay 36 eiects the connection of connectors 32h, the negative line wire B2 the contacts 32d and 32eV with the positive line wire BI. The 'connector 32a being connected through the conductor El to the positive line wire Bl, the several lamps of the lower compartment of the signal lights 26, 21 and 28 are connected in parallel with the battery 20. The relay 36 therefore upon being energized effects the illumination'of these lamps.

' The relays 33 and 36 are by the relays I6 and 34.

32e and 32j with and the connection of jointly controlled The relay 16 controls the connection of one side of the relays 33, 35 and 36 to the negative line wire B2. The control of this connection is leffected through a pair of cooperating fixed and movable contacts 16e and lGf which are normally separated due to the energization of the relay I6. The movable contact If is connecte-d tothe conductor GI and thus to the negativeline'wire B2. The Contact |6e which cooperates with the contact E61 is connected to a conductor J l to which one side of each of the relays 33, 35 and 36 is connected in common. The relay 34 controls the connection of the relays 33 andY 36 with the positive line wire BI. This connection is controlled through 'two pairs of fixed and movable contacts Btg- 3th and Mii-34j. The movable contacts 3th and 347 are connected in common to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive line wire Bit The contact 3tlg is connected by a conductor J2 to the coil of the relay 33 and the coil of the relay 36 is connected through a conducto-r J3 to the contact 341'. The contacts 34g and 343k and 352' and 347' are normally in engagement so that the coils of the relays 33 and 36 are normally connected to the'positive side of the battery. If therefore the relay I8 is deenergized while the relay Sil remains deenergized, the relays 33 and @it will be operated. If however the relay Sil is operated simultaneously with the deenergization of the relay l 6, the relays 33 and 35 will remain deenergized and ineiective.

When a re occurs in the zone served by the stairway indicators the relay 34 is energized simultaneously with the deenergization of the relay I6 as will hereinafter appear. When this condition exists, the relays 33 and 3S are cut out of the circuit by the relay 34 but the relay 35 which is not controlled by the relay 3d is energized and eiTects the illumination of the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals which illuminate the arrows pointing away from the zone of the re represented by the stairway indicators and the relay 34 effects the illumination of the lights in the stop compartment of the exit signs. The connection of the relay 35 to the positive side of the line and thus across the battery is controlled by a relay 3l which, in another zone having signals duplicating those illustrated and located to the right of the zone indicated by the illustrated exit signs, corresponds to the relay 34. The coil of the relay 35 is connected through a conductor J Il to a xed contact 31a. of the relay 31. The fixed Contact Sla` is normally in engagement with a movable contact 31h which is connected to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive side of the battery. If therefore the relays 3d and I6 are simultaneously operated, the relays 33 and 36 will remain deenergized and inoperative but the relay 35 will be en- Y ergized and effect the parallel connection of the lights in the upper compartments of the directional signals 25, 2l and 28.

The relay 34 is energized upon the existence of a iire in the zone served by the stairway indicators Il, I8 and I9 and the directional signals 26, 21 and 28. For each zone, there is a separate and distinct re circuit so that each zone is in-v lay 34 being connected to the conductor G2 in series with the relay 38. This connection includes a conductor Kl which connects one side of the coil of the relay 3S with the conductor G2, and a conductor K2 which is connecte-d by a conductor K3 to one side of the relay 3d. The conductor K2 is also connected by a conductor K to one side of the relay 3T so that there is a series parallel connection between the relay -38 and the relays 34 and 3l, the relays 34 and 31 being connected in parallel and this parallel connection being in series with the relay 38. The other side oi the relay 34 is connected through a conductor K5 to a connector 39. The connector is in turn connected to a stationary contact 40a of a re relay lll by a conductor K5. A movable Contact llib of the relay fl@ cooperates with the contact Ma,

and this latter contact is connected through av conductor Kl to the negative side of the battery through a connector 2do on the panel 23. The contacts ltd and 552th are normally separated and are brought into engagement upon the energization ci the relay til. A similar circuit (not shown) located in another zone is utilized to control the relay This circuit includes the vconductor K5 which connects the relay and a connector 3Q.

The relay it is included in a circuit which includes a conductor Ll which connects one side of the coil of the relay it to the connector 2ild Y and thus to the positive side of the battery 26, a

conductor L2 which connects the other side of the coil or" the relay dll with a supervisory relay fil, a conductor L3 which connects the relay M with one element Lt of a thermo-responsive or iire detecting cable ll, a conductor L5 which connects the other end oi the element Lll with one side of a resistance lit, a conductor L@ which connects the other side of the resistance i3 with one side of another element Ll of the re detecting cable @l2 and a conductor Lil which connects the other end of the element Ll with the conductor Kl and thus to the negative side of the battery. This is the supervised automatic re circuit disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 388,148, filed August 24, i929, for Fire detecting systems. The resistance of the circuit is such that the supervisory relay il is normally energized but the nre relay lil is normally deenergized. However, when the elements Ll, and L4 are brought together by virtue of a`rise in temperature and the resistance .13 is cut out of the circuit, the current flowing through the circuit is suilicient to energize the relay d and cause the engagement oi the contacts ita and liilb. The thermo-responsive cable is of the type disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 352,624, led

April 5, 1929, for Cable and method of producing the same. A manual fire alarm box 42 is also provided for the purpose of effecting the operation or" the relay llt. This manual re alarm box which is shown 'diagrammatically is merely a switch that is connected across the elements L4 and Ll' of the thermo-responsive cable 2. Upon the closing of this switch the resistance t3 is cut out or the circuit and the full energization of the relay il@ is elected.

When the relay it@ operates in addition to effecting the energization of the relay 3d, it eiects the energization of the relay 3S which is in series with the relay 315. The relay 38 is as heretofore explained connected in series with each and every one of the relays of the several zones, such as the relay 3l, which corresponds to the relay 34. This relay is therefore operated when the operation of a fire circuit is. effected, irrespective of which fire circuit is operated. Upon operation, the relay 33 does several things: it eflects the operation of the relay i5 to disconnect the 110 volt supply from the Zone in which the re is located and thus the deenergization of the relay lli; and it arranges the circuits so that no trouble signalsr of the coil of the relay I5 to the positive conductor G2, a conductor M2 which connects the other side of the coil of the relay I5 with the xed contact 381) of the relay 38 and the conductor G2 to which the movable contact 35a, is connected.V It will be evident that upon the engagement of the contacts 38a and 38h the coil of the relay 35 is connected across the thirty-two volt battery and the relay is energized. The energization of the relay separates contacts I5a-i5b and l5c-I5d which form a part of the volt circuit to the lamps in the exit compartments of the stairway indicators I'I, I8 and I9. The contacts Ia and I5bralso open the circuit to the relay It thus deenergizing this relay. Y

As heretofore stated, the deenergization of relay I5 through its contacts I Se and IEf connects relays 33, 35 and 36 tothe negative side of the battery. The effect of this connection with the simultaneous opening of the contacts 3fm-34h and 34z`34j of the relay 34 effects the operation of the lamps in the upper'compartment of the directional signals and the contacts 34a to 34] of the relay 34 effects the operation of the lamps in the stop compartments of the stairway indicators Il, I8 and I9. The lights in the exit signs are of course disconnected from the source of the supply and this portion of the sign is no longer illuminated. The arrows in the upper compartments of the directional signs 26, 2l and 28 point away from the stairway or exit zone having the indicators Il, I8 and I9 and in which the fire signalV originated.

The trouble signals for this system to assure the production of an informative trouble signal in the event of any disarrangement which would preclude the proper functioning of the exit control system includes local trouble lamps 44, 45, 45, 4'I and48 which are mounted upon 4the panel 23 with the aforementioned relays and a remote trouble light 49. The local trouble lights 44 to 48 inclusive are specic in their indication and the remote trouble light general in its indication to the exit control system and it is located on the main panel of the fire system Which may include various. re alarms and announcing systems. There is usually only one main control panel in given premises for a fire detecting and alarm system, but there may be more than one eXit indicator control panel. When there is more than one exit indicator panel there is `one visual trouble signal 49 for each at the main control panel. The advantage of having a number o1" exit indicator control panels is the reduction of the length of the Wiring between the lights in the signs and their control relays;

Upon the operation of any one of the signals 44 to 48, the signal 49 is also operated. The signal 49 indicates at the remote point that there isv trouble in the stairway indicator or directional signal circuits; the specific signal on the board 23 indicates the particular circuit in which the trouble exists. The operation of the remote trouble light 49 is effected through a relay 5E). The circuit to this relay includes the line L! to which one side of the relay is connected and a conductor NI which connects the other side of the relay to a connector 5I mounted on the panel 23. The contacter 5I -is connected by a conductor N2 to a movable contact 38d of the relay 3B. This movable contact is normally in engagement with a cooperating stationary contact 38C and when the relay becomes energized the contact 38d is separated from the contact 38C andV engages a contact 38e. The contact 38C is connected by a conductor N3 to one side of a resistance 52. The other side of this resistance is connected by a conductor N4 to the negative line wire B2. Thus, there is a complete circuit to the relay 50 which is normallydeenergized due to the resistance of the circuit, particularly the resistance 52.

The light 49 is connected in the circuit O which includes the conductor OI that connects one side of the light with the connector 4I and thus to the negative side of the battery, a conducor O2 which connects the other side of the light to a stationary Contact 58a of the relay 58, a movable contact 59d which cooperates with the relay 58a and is brought into engagement therewith upon the full energization of the relay 58 and the con- Vductor LI to which the movable contact 50h is connected. Thus upon the operation of the relay 58 the trouble light 49 is illuminated.

When the relay I6 is deenergized due toa failure of the 110 volt line, the relay 50 is fully energized and the trouble signal 44 is also energized. When the relay I6 becomes deenergized, assuming that the relay Y38 is not operated, the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit N. This is accomplished through the engagement of contacts Ita and IGI) which are normally separated by the energization of the relay I5. The contact ISa is a iiXed contact'and it is connected by a conductor PI to the negative line wire B2. The movable contact IIb is connected by a conductor P2 to the conductor N3. Thus when the contacts ida and IEb are in engagement the circuit to the relay 5l) includes the conductor LI the conductor NI, the conductor N2, ixed and movable contacts 38a and 38d of relay 38, conductor N3, conductor P2, contacts Ia. and IBb of relay I6, conductor PI and negative line Wire B2. The resistance 52 is thus shunted out of the circuit and the relay 50 becomes fully energized and effects the illumination or energization of the light 49.

rilhe light 44 is connected in a circuit which includes xed and movable contacts I6c and I6d of the relay I5. Upon the deenergization of the relay these contacts are brought into engagement. The contact |501 is directly connected to the conductor GI and thus to the negative side of the battery. The contactor |50 is connected to a conductor-QI which is also connected to one side of the light 44. The other side of the light 44 is connected in common with the lights 45, 46, 4i and 48 to a conductor Q2 which is also connectedto a iixed contact 38g on the relay 38 which cooperates with a movable contact 38j.

The movable contact 38] is connected to the conductor G2 and thus to the positive line wire BI. Consequently upon the deenergization of the relay I6 with the continued deenergization of the relay 38 the circuit connecting the light 44 to the battery 20 is completed and the light 44 is energized.

The light 45 is operated upon the deenergization of the relay 2l which is connected in series with the circuit B that includes the thirty-two volt emergency lamps in the exit compartments of the signs Il', i8 and I9. The circuit to the light 45 includes the conductor N4 to which a movable contact 2 Id of the relay 2| is connected. Contact 2id cooperates with a contact 2Ic which is connected by a conductor RI to one side of the light 45, the other side of the light being connected to the conductor Q2 and thus,.as heretofore described, through the contacts 38f and 35g of the relay 38 to the positive side of the battery. The relay 2l also includes contacts 2Ia and Elib. The contact 2id is connected to the.

conductor N4 and the contact 2 lb is connected to the conductor N3. Upon engagement of these two contacts by the deenergization of the relay 2l the conductors N3 and N4 are connected together by the contacts Zia and 2lb and the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit. The relay 55 is thus energized. Contacts 24a and 24D of relay 24, contacts 22a and 29h of relay 2S) and contacts 31a and Sib of relay 3l are connected in parallel to the conductors N3 and N4 with the contacts 2id and 2lb of the relay 2|.' Upon the deenergization of either of relays 24, 29 and 3l and the engagement of the contacts a and b thereof the resistance 52 is shunted out of the circuit in the same manner as by the engagement of contacts 2id and 2lb. The circuit to the relay 55 upon the happening of this event, includes conductor Ll, relay 55, conductor Nl, conductor N2, contacts 38e and 38d of relay 38, conductor N3, contact b of either relay 2 i, 24, 29 or 3|, the corresponding contact a `in either oi these relays, conductor N4 and negative line wire B2.

The relay 24 has contacts 24D and 24e which are included in the circuit to the light 46. Contact 24d is connected to the conductor N4 and thus to the negative side of the battery and the contact 24C is connected by a conductor Sl to the one side of the light 45, the other side of which is connected to the conductor Q2 and thus to the negative side of the battery through the contacts of relay 38. Similarly relay 29 includes contacts 25o and 25d, contact 29o being connected to the conductor N4 and contact 29d being connected to one side of the light 4l through a conductor Tl. Contacts 3Ic and Sid of relay 3l are likewise included in the circuit to the trouble light 4S. This circuit includes the conductor N4 to which the contact 3io is connected, contact 3ld which cooperates with contact Slc and a conductor Ul which connects contact Sid to the light 48.

As heretofore described, relays 2l, 24, 29 and 3l are supervisory relays of circuits B, C, D and E. Thus the trouble lights 45, 46, 41 and 48 when lighted respectively indicate trouble in the circuits B, C, D and E.

When the relay 38 is operated, it prevents the operation of any of the trouble signals. As heretofore described, all of the local trouble signals 44, 45, 45, 41 and 45 are connected to the positive side of the battery through normally closed contacts 38j and 38g of relay 38. On the energization of the relay 38 these normally closed contacts are separated and the circuit between the positive side of the battery and the trouble lights 44 to 48 inclusive. is broken. Also upon the operation of the relay 3B the movable contact 38d, as heretofore stated, is disconnected from the contact 38o and brought into engagement with the contact 38e. Contact 38e is. connected by a conductor VI to one end of a resistance 53. The other end of the resistance is connected by a conductor V2 to the negative line wire B2. Thus upon the operation of the relay 33 the engagement of the contacts 38C and 33d is broken thus preventing the transmission to the general panel of the trouble signal and the resistance 53 is substituted for the resistance 52, thus maintaining the partial deenergization of the relay 55 and consequently the deenergization of the light 49.

It is believed that the operation of the system will be apparent from the above description thereof. It is to be noted that any number of Zones may be interconnected. In such interconand in thisv manner the connections may be so arranged that a fire alarm originating either automatically or manually will not only cause the red stop signs in its own Zone to be lit, but if the layout of the buildings corridors should so demand, the illumination of remote red stop signals located in adjacent zones as well. This remote zone signalling is illustrated in control of relay 55 by the relay 3l. In this. manner occupants of the buildings who have been notified by signals or announcements to evacuate the building, are directed against entering the stairway located in the Zone in which the fire exists and they are directed to a stairway in a Zone in which a lire does not exist.

The system described above is complemental to the system disclosed in the copending application Serial No. 687,278 of William D. Lindsey, iiled August 29, 1933, wherein the firemen are automatically called and directed to the vertical Zone that originates the alarm, and the exit control herein explained precludes the outgoing occupants from using the same stairways and egress doorways that have been reserved for the incoming remen.

It will be obvious that various changes may be made by those skilled in the art in the details of the system illustrated above within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically operated, directional signals, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, control means common to the several signals and operative to eiect the connection of all the signals to the source of electrical energy to effect the operation of the signals, additional individual control means for each signal operative to open the circuit between the signal and the source of energy and maintain the particular signal inoperative and means for operating the common control means simultaneously with the operation of one of the individual control means, whereby certain of the signals are operated to indicate one direction and the other signals are operated to indicate another direction.

2. In a signal system, a plurality of groups of directional signals each containing, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, control means for each series of signals Within each group and operative to eiect the connection of the signals of the series to the source oi energy to effect the operation of the series controlled thereby, another control means common to the control means of the several series of signals, and additional control means individual to certain of the iirst mentioned control means and adapted upon operation to efrect the response of such control means to the operation of the second mentioned control means, whereby certain groups of signals indicate one direction and the other groups indicate another direction.

3. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a. source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit mon control means for effecting a parallel connection between all of the signals and the source of energy to eiTect the operation of all the signals, and additional control means individual to each group of signals and operative to effect the continued series connection of its group irrespective of the operation of the common control means.`

4. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source oi electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series with the source of energy, common control means for eiecting a parallel connection between all of the signals and the source of energy to effect the operation of all the signals, additional control means individual to each group of signals and operative to effect the continued series connection of its group irrespective of the operation of the common control means, and means for operating the common control means and a group control means simultaneously.

5. In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a source of electrical energy for supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series with the source of energy, control means for each group operative to eiect a parallel connection between the signals of the group and the source of energy, other common control means operative to eiect the operation of all of the first mentioned control means, and additional control means individual to certain of the groups of the first mentioned control means and operative to effect the control thereof by said second mentioned control means.

6.V In a signal system, a plurality of electrically actuated signals arranged in several groups, a sourceof electrical energyfor supplying energy to operate the signals, a closed electrical circuit for each group of signals including the signals connected in series With the source of energy, control means for each group operative to effect a parallel connection between the signals of the group and the source of energy, other common control means operative to effect the operation of all of the iirst mentioned control means, additional control means individual to certain of the groups of the first mentioned control means and operative to effect the control thereof by said second mentioned control means, and means for effecting the operation of the second mentioned control means and one of the third mentioned control means simultaneously.

7. In a signal system, two directional signals, each signal having indicia for indicating different directions, a plurality of control units, and means operable upon the operation of one of said control units to eiTect the operation of one of said signals to indicate one direction and the simultaneous operation of the other signal to indicate a diferent direction.

8, In a signal system, two groups of directional signals, each signal of each group having indicia for indicating different directions, control units for each group of signals, each control unit adapted to effect the operation of a group of signals to indicate one direction, and means operable upon the operation of one of said control units to effect the simultaneous operation of the other group of signals to indicate a different direction.

WILLIAMk D. LINDSEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3482317 *Oct 12, 1966Dec 9, 1969Truax Gene LFootball position indicator
US3772671 *May 22, 1972Nov 13, 1973Owen WFire alarm
US3868670 *Feb 4, 1974Feb 25, 1975Said O Nory By Said ReisterCustomer service display
US3916404 *Dec 4, 1972Oct 28, 1975Thomas Industries IncDetecting, alerting and directing system
US4074225 *May 9, 1975Feb 14, 1978Engleway CorporationEmergency detection alarm and evacuation system
US4385586 *Sep 4, 1981May 31, 1983Schriever Frederick GEscape/rescue system
US4401050 *Sep 30, 1981Aug 30, 1983Britt Laurence DPhosphorescent escape route indicator
US5815068 *Dec 8, 1994Sep 29, 1998Vadseth; Jan ErikGuiding light system and lighting strip
US7182040 *Aug 1, 2003Feb 27, 2007Dan PharoPersonnel guidance and location control system
US7412942 *Mar 12, 2007Aug 19, 2008Dan PharoPersonnel location control system with informational message presentation
DE3843977A1 *Dec 27, 1988Jun 28, 1990Hubert Prof Dr KarlMethod for indicating an escape route in the case of a dangerous event (incident)
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/332, 340/525, 340/593, 340/517
International ClassificationG08B5/22, G08B5/36
Cooperative ClassificationG08B7/062, G08B5/22
European ClassificationG08B7/06E, G08B5/22