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Publication numberUS2085934 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1937
Filing dateJan 10, 1933
Priority dateJan 10, 1933
Publication numberUS 2085934 A, US 2085934A, US-A-2085934, US2085934 A, US2085934A
InventorsVon Till Louis A
Original AssigneeAnchor Cap & Closure Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Screw cap and package
US 2085934 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1937- L. A. VON TILL 2,085,934

scanw CAP 'AND PACKAGE A Filed Jan. 10, 1953 {Ill/Izgf/l/II:

Patented July 6, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Anchor Cap & Closure Corporation,

Long

Island City, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application January 10, 1933, Serial No. 650,949

14 Claims.

The present invention relates to screw caps and sealed packages, and more particularly to lug screw caps and packages provided therewith.

Lug screw caps are easier to apply and remove than continuous thread caps. One or more turns are required to apply or remove continuous thread caps, while a friction of a turn will apply or remove lug caps. In addition, the threads on a continuous thread cap tend to grip both the upper and lower sides of the container thread and sometimes "freeze on the thread of the concaps, while a fraction of a turn will apply or removal. Lug caps, as a class, also form more secure seals because continuous thread caps seldom grip the rim of the container throughout its circumference and the cap tends to cock up on one side forming improperly sealed packages.

One serious diificulty with lug caps is the accuracy required in the manufacture thereof, and the 20 correspond-ing accuracy required in the manu-' facture of the glass containers to which they are applied. Because of the low price at which the large quantities of caps and containers are sold, it it not possible to gauge and inspect individual 25 caps and containers for correctness in size, hence it is not possible to properly reject the oversize and undersize containers. ,Definite tolerances have been worked out for the various glass companies and these companies endeavor to keep the variations in the glass within the limits prescribed, but frequently fail to do so. Where the thread of the glass is too low on the container, the lug tends to ride over the thread, which raises one side of the cap and impairs the seal. the thread is too high on the container, one side of the cap is pulled down with insufficient force to form a tight seal. In either case, the seal is defective and the packages are likely to spoil. Where the caps fail to work properly, the packer calls in both the cap company and the glass companies to find out the trouble, and dispute arises as to where the fault lies. For a number of years, there has been a persistent demand for a lug cap which will accommodate a greater range of size variations in glass containers.

The present invention aims to limit or mini.- mize the above difliculties and to provide a lug cap which has greater flexibility, and which is capable of forming a perfect seal on both oversized and undersized containers, and aims to do this without increasing the cost of the cap.

An object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive lug cap adapted to accommodate a greater range of size variations in glass containers.

Where Another, object of the invention is to improve the seal formed by lug closures.

Another object of the invention is to increase the resiliency and flexibility of the closure.

Another object of the invention is to facilitate application and removal of caps by providing greater clearance betweenthe skirt of the cap and the container threads.

Another object of the invention is to provide corrugations shaped to enhance the appearance of the cap.

Other and further objects of the invention will be obvious upon an understanding of the illustrative embodiment about to be described, or will be indicated in the appended claims, and various advantages not referred to herein will occur to one skilled in the art upon employment of the invention in practice.

A preferred embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration'and description and is shown in the accompanying drawing, forming a part of the specification, wherein Fig. 1 is a sealed package illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view,

through one of the lugs of the cap, illustrating details of the construction;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view corresponding to Fig. 2, taken intermediate the lugs of the D;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating the cap applied to a container;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating another embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating still another embodiment of the invention; and

Fig. '7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating a further modification of the present invention.

Referring again to the drawing, there is shown a container I having thread projections 2 at the upper end thereof spaced above a shoulder l.

A closure cap 5 is applied to the container and may have a cover portion 8 and a depending skirt 1, with the lower edge of the skirt rolled outwardly into a. bead or wire edge 8. Suitable lugs 9 may be formed from the beaded edge by pressing portions thereof inwardly at intervals about the periphery thereof to engage with the thread projections 2 on the container. A suitable liner IQ rim of the container. The cap may be applied to thecontainer with a fraction of a turn, and removed in like manner.

The present closure differs from present lug caps in that the cover portion of the cap is extended outwardly a very substantial distance beyond the rim of the container, as shown at H, and the skirt of the cap is tapered inwardly toward the bottom thereof so that the upper inner diameter of the skirt i2 is substantially larger than the inner diameter at the lower portion I3 of the skirt. These and other difierences in the construction of the cap produce certain very desirable results. The construction of the bottom of the skirt permits a snug fit of the lugs 9 under the thread projections 2 of the container. The additional space provided by the upper flare of the skirt of the cap above the lugs affords ample clearance between the skirt of the cap and the thread projections 2 on the container. Hence, when the cap is applied or removed from the container, the only friction to be overcome is that between the lugs of the cap and the threads on the container. With the closure manufactured at the present time, oversized containers may engage the inner side of the skirt of the cap, making the cap more difficult to turn, either on application or removal. In addition, the containers are made in split molds and, hence, there are two mold marks or small fins extending outwardly with too much force, or to a container havinga thread slightly lower than it should be, there is a tendency for the lug to ride up over the thread on the container and raise or bulge a portion of the cover portion of the cap, forming a defective seal. With the constricted skirt, as illustrated herein, any tendency for the lug to ride over the thread of the container is minimized by reason of the substantial overhang of the cover portion of the cap, giving greater flexibility, as shown more particularly at l5. In other words, the cover portion of the cap, overhanging the side of the container is essentially like a cantilever, and the longer the cantilever, the more it can be bent downwardly to take up greater variations in the position of the thread on the container. This is shown more particularly in Fig. 4. Any tendency of the lugs to ride over the thread expands the bottom of the skirt, and since the skirt is not vertical, but at an acute angle, outward expansion of the skirt brings it nearer to vertical and increases the distance between the lug and the cover portion of the cap. This is shown more particularly by the dotted line 16, in Fig. 2, which is an are formed by swinging the lower side of the lug about the junction of the skirt and the cover portion of the cap.

To increase further the effectiveness of the seal and the flexibility of the cap, there is provided an annular depression or groove I! directly above the rim of the container. This depression concentrates the sealing pressure over a small area and increases its effectiveness. In addition, it increases the cantilever effect and the flexibility of the overhang, which the cover portion has beyond the side wall of the container.

It is to be understood that the groove I! may be omitted if desired and, likewise, the center of the cover portion of the cap may be domed or otherwise shaped to suit the individual taste. corrugations l8 are preferably formed in the skirt of the cap and extend substantially from the top to the upper side of the wire edge. While corrugations of any suitable shape may be utilized, preferably, the corrugations increase in depth from the upper part to the lower part thereof, and are pressed outwardly from the skirt of the cap. By forming the corrugations in this manner, the inwardly tapered skirt appears to be more nearly cylindrical and the wire edge of the cap projects a lesser distance from the bottom of the skirt. The wire edge on the ordinary cap is commonly thought to be cumbersome in appearance and considerable effort has been made to reduce its size in an effort to improve the appearance of the cap. The present inwardly ta.- pered skirt decreases the difference between the external diameter of the wire edge and the ex: ternal diameter of the top of the cap, thereby improving the appearance of the cap, which is also accentuated by the shape of the corrugations.

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 5, the sealing zone is inclined with respect to the plane of the cover portion, as shown at 20. Preferably, the inner side of the inclined sealing zone'is substantially at the inner side of the rim of the com tainer. By having the sealing zone inclined as shown, the liner is spaced from the inclined portion and forced upwardly against it during the sealing operation. This facilitates the accommodation of irregularities and improves the seal by making the sealing operation continue for a greater period.

In Fig. 6, a slightly different construction is shown wherein the upper portion of the cap skirt is substantially cylindrical and may be provided with suitable corrugations 26. Below the cylindrical zone, an annular inwardly inclined portion 21 is provided, having a wire edge 8 with thread engaging lugs 9 formed therein. By reason of the inclined zone 21, the skirt of the cap is substantially resilient and the upright zone 25 extends away from and out of contact with the threads of the container, whereby a better seal may be provided.

In Fig. 7 the skirt of the cap is flared outwardly at 29 and flared inwardly at the lower portion thereof, as shown at 30. Preferably, an intermediate, substantially cylindrical zone 31 may be provided, wherein suitable corrugations are formed to facilitate gripping the cap. The flared zones 29 and 30 absorb excessive sealing forces effective upon the skirt of the cap, whereby a better fit between the cap and container is provided, even if they vary from a prescribed standard. In addition, the cap skirt is out of contact with the container threads and binding engagement is prevented. If a cap is sealed too tightly, the skirt may be tapped or pressed inwardly to increase the length thereof, whereby the lugs are moved slightly out of contact with the container threads and removal of the cap is facilitated.

In operation, the closure cap is applied to the container in the usual manner. The lugs 9 slip between the ends of the projections 2, and a quarter turn applies the cap, as shown more particularly in Figs. 1 and 4. As the cap is screwed home, the pressure on the lugs is considerable. irregularities in the glass are taken up by the increased flexibility of the cap occasioned by the increased amount of overhang which the cover tainer, and by the increased distance between the cover portion and the lug occasioned by outward pressure on the skirt of the cap, which, as pointed out hereinbefore, tends to press the skirt outwardly to its vertical position, thereby increasing the distance between the cover portion and the lug. The reduction in the size of the lower part of the cap causes the lugs to fit snugly over the projections 2, with ample clearance between the skirt of the cap and the outer sides of the projections. In other words, the cap is snug where it should be snug, and has ample clearance where clearance is needed.

It will be seen that the presentv invention provides a lug closure cap having greater flexibility than caps known heretofore. The closures will accommodate a greater range of variations in the size of the containers, without endangering the seal in any way. The closures may be applied or removed with greater case because of this flexibility, and because of ample clearance between the skirt of the cap and the threads on-the container. The inward taper of the skirt and the reduced diameter of the bottom thereof causes a very snug fit of the lugs of the cap beneath the threads of the container and minimizes the tendency of the lugs to ride over the threads. In addition, any outward movement of a lug in an effort to ride over the thread causes the lug to move downwardly, whereas if the skirt were cylindrical, the lug would move upwardly under similar circumstances. The downward movement of the lug will, of course, tend to compensate for the irregularity of the position of the thread on the container. The closure is simple in construction and can be made with the same machinery and at substantially the same cost as present closures.

As various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts herein without departing from the spirit andscope of the invention andwithout sacrificing any of 'its advantages, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, 2. depending skirt, said skirt being constricted inwardly from the upper part to substantially the lower part thereof, and lugs formed on the bottom of said skirt. 4

2. As an article of manufacture, closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, said skirt being inclined inwardly from the upper to the lower-part thereof whereby the'lower part of said skirt has a smaller diameter than the upper part thereof, a rolled edge at the bottom of said skirt, and lugs formed from said lower edge for engagement with threads on a container.

3. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap.

comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, said skirt being tapered inwardly to reduce the diameter of the lower part thereof, a rolled edge at the bottom of said skirt, and lugs formed by pressing inwardly portions of said rolled edge, the increased size of the upper part of the skirt being adapted to afford ample space for the threads on the container, without engaging the outer sides thereof.

4. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion,

' a depending skirt, said skirt being tapered inwardly from the top to the bottom thereof to afford ample clearance for the threads of the container, a rolled edge at the bottom of said skirt, and lugs formed from said rolled edge by pressing inwardly portions thereof, and corrugations in said skirt. r

5. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, said skirt being tapered inwardly toward the bottom thereof to afford clearance for the threads of the container, and lugs formed by pressing inwardly portions of the bottom of the skirt, and vertical corrugations in 'the skirt of the cap, said corrugations being pressed outwardly therefrom and extending outwardly further at the lower portion of. the skirt than at the upper portion thereof.

6. As an article of manufacture, aclosure oomprising a cover portion, a depending skirt, a rolled edge at the. bottom of said skirt and lugs formed by pressing inwardly portions of said rolled edge, the bottom of said skirt being substantially smaller than the upper portion thereof to afford greater flexibility when the cap is applied to a container.

7. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt, a rolled edge at the bottom of said skirt and lugs formed from said rolled edge, said skirt being tapered inwardly from the upper portion thereof to the lower portion thereof, and corrugations in said skirt increasing in depth from the upper part thereof to the lower part thereof.-

8. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a

depending skirt having an annular inwardly inclined portion at the lower part thereof, and lugs formed on the bottom of said skirt.

9. As an article of manufacture, a closure cap, comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt having a cylindrical zone provided with corrugations and an inwardly inclined zone below said cylindrical zone, and container engaging means formed on the bottom of the skirt.

10. A sealed package comprising the combination of a container having projections thereon, a closure cap having a cover portion and depending skirt, the internal diameter of said skirt being smallest at the bottom thereof'to increase the extension of the cover part of/the cap beyond the rim of the container, a rolled edge on the bottom of said skirt, lugs formed from said rolled edge adapted, to engage the projections on the container and a sealing member intermediate the rim of the container and the cover of the cap.

' 11. A sealed package comprising a container having thread projections at the upper end thereof, a screw closure cap having a cover portion and a'depending skirt, said-skirt being tapered inwardly to increase the distance which the cover portion of the cap extends outwardly over the portion, a depending skirt having an annular inwardly inclined portion at the lower part therei of, a rolled edge at the bottom of said skirt and 11 8 inwardly extending container engaging formed from said rolled edge.

13. As an article of manufacture, a screw closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt having a substantially cylindrical zone provided with corrugations, an inwardly extending zone below said substantially cylindrical zone, an outwardly rolled edge at the bottom of the skirt below said inwardly extending zone, and container engaging means formed from said rolled edge.

14. As an article of manufacture, a screw closure cap comprising the combination of a cover portion, a depending skirt having a substantially cylindrical zone provided with corrugations, an inwardly extending zone below said substantially cylindrical zone, an outwardly rolled edge at the bottom of the skirt below said inwardly extending zone, whereby said rolled edge does not extend outwardly substantially beyond the cylindrical zone, inwardly extending container engaging lugs formed from said rolled edge and a sealing member in said cap.

- LOUIS A. VON TILL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2920778 *Mar 5, 1957Jan 12, 1960Grace W R & CoTwist-off closures
US3028033 *Aug 1, 1957Apr 3, 1962Anchor Hocking Glass CorpClosure
US3448881 *May 2, 1967Jun 10, 1969Continental Can CoClosure with means to control opening torque
US4722448 *Feb 17, 1987Feb 2, 1988Bankers Trust Co.Plastic bottle caps
US4815616 *Feb 29, 1988Mar 28, 1989The Dow Chemical CompanyAngled dispensing closure
US5947311 *May 6, 1997Sep 7, 1999Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Plastic closure with liner having a periphery spaced from the skirt of the closure and a sealing surface angled axially with respect to the base wall of the closure
US6103170 *Jun 23, 1999Aug 15, 2000Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Method of forming a plastic closure with liner having a periphery spaced from the skirt of the closure and a sealing surface angled axially with respect to the base wall of the closure
US6948630Oct 21, 2002Sep 27, 2005Rexam Medical Packaging, Inc.Self-draining container neck and closure
US7644902May 31, 2003Jan 12, 2010Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Apparatus for producing a retort thermal processed container with a peelable seal
US7766178Jan 29, 2007Aug 3, 2010Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Closure for a retort processed container having a peelable seal
US7780024Jan 25, 2006Aug 24, 2010Rexam Closures And Containers Inc.Self peel flick-it seal for an opening in a container neck
US7798359Jul 28, 2005Sep 21, 2010Momar Industries LLCHeat-sealed, peelable lidding membrane for retort packaging
US8100277Dec 19, 2006Jan 24, 2012Rexam Closures And Containers Inc.Peelable seal for an opening in a container neck
US8251236Nov 2, 2007Aug 28, 2012Berry Plastics CorporationClosure with lifting mechanism
US8650839May 19, 2008Feb 18, 2014Berry Plastics CorporationClosure with lifting mechanism
US20030116522 *Oct 21, 2002Jun 26, 2003Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Self-draining container neck and closure
DE1063481B *Oct 15, 1952Aug 13, 1959Alfons Isele AreggerDichtungseinlage fuer Flaschenverschluss-kapseln
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/333, 215/351, 215/349, 220/303, 220/293
International ClassificationB65D41/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/045
European ClassificationB65D41/04D2