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Publication numberUS2086552 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 13, 1937
Filing dateMay 13, 1933
Priority dateMay 13, 1933
Publication numberUS 2086552 A, US 2086552A, US-A-2086552, US2086552 A, US2086552A
InventorsEmerson E Hogg
Original AssigneeAluminum Co Of America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for applying closures to containers
US 2086552 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 13, 1937. E. E. HOGG A 2,086,552

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR APPLYING CLOSURES TO CONTAINERS v Filed May 15, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet l 45 /0 1m H w") i an INVENTOR [flit/sari f. J/ojj ATTORNEY July 13, 1937; E. E. HOGG 2,086,552

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR APPLYING CLOSURES TO CONTAINERS Filed May 13, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 f l I r a {9" g IN VENT 0R [me/s00 E. .Eyy

A TTORNEY July 13, 1937. E. E. HOGG 2,086,552

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR APPIJYlNG CLOSURES TO CONTAINERS Filed May 13, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 7 ////AIIIIIIIV/////,/

INVENTOR [me/"s00 il A TTORNE Y Patented July 13, 1937 UNITED STATES METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR APPLYING CLQSURES TO CONTAINERS Emerson E. Hogg, New Kensington, Pa., assignor to Aluminum Company of America, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application May is, 1933, Serial No. 670,925

ratus for applying closures or caps to containers.

Although the invention herein described and claimed may have other uses, it is particularly described with reference to the sealing of containers with closures composed of thin, flexible, and inherently fragile metal foil, or similar deformable material.

The packaging of foods or other substances in glass containers by sealing the container with metal foil has recently found considerable favor. The use of closures made of thin, flexible, and in herently fragile metal foil has introduced new problems into the art of sealing containers, which problems it is the general object of this invention to solve. While the invention is particularly adapted to the sealing of comparatively wide mouth containers of the thin-blown glass variety, such as glass tumblers, with a preformed closure composed of vmetal foil, the methods and apparatus of the invention are readily adaptable to the application, to any type of container, of 010- sures which are characterized by their inherent weakness and frangibiiity.

The packaging of foods or other substances in wide mouth glass containers which, after the contents thereof are removed, may be used by the ultimate buyer as a drinking glass, or for other and similar domestic purposes, is gaining widespread use today. In order to meet its ultimate purpose, the wide mouth glass container is usually light and thin-walled. It has also a smooth exterior and interior glass finish adjacent its mouth or open end, and is characterized by the'absence of any sharply projecting head or thread or other formation which would interfere with the container being used for drinking purposes. Instead of the usual bead or thread with which glass containers are commonly finished for the purpose of facilitating the securing of a closure thereto, these particular thin-blown, wide mouth glass containers are provided with a glass-finish, the exterior diameter of which is slightly greater. than the container adjacent and immediately below the glass finish. Exemplary of one type of glass finish contemplated by this invention is a bead slightly larger in cross section than the wall thickness of its container. Another commercial form of finish adaptable to the principles of my invention is one which incorporates a flared portion tainer of any sharp or abrupt formation upon which, or around which, the closure may be secured, thus enhancing the difliculty of effecting a tight and efficient seal between the closure and container. Also thin-walled glass containers of the type referred to cannot be economically manufactured within close dimensional tolerances and, therefore, the opening which must be sealed is often of variant diameter, the variation being often as much as three-thirty-seconds of an inch.

It is the general object of this invention to provide methods and apparatus by means of which a preformed inherently fragile closure may be secured to the glass finish of a comparatively wide mouth container.

A particular object of the invention is the provision of a method and apparatus which will substantially meet the difiiculties hereinabove mentioned in connection with the securing of a preformed inherently fragile, metallic foil closure upon the glass finish of an inherently fragile thinwalled glass container.

A further object of the invention is to provide a closure-applying apparatus which is simple in construction and which may be used for the manual application of preformed metallic foil closures to glass finishes incorporated in containers of any sort.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a closure-applying apparatus incorporating a sealing head automatically adjustable to adaptation to commercial tolerances in container finishes and incorporating resilient means for applying pressure to the sealing head to insure against breaking of the containers during a closure-applying operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide new and eflicient methods of forming'tight and effective seals between the relatively smooth walls of a container and a preformed metallic foil closure applied thereto.

A further object of the invention is to provide a closure-applying mechanism which includes, in its organization, a resilient pressure-applying device which provides a resilient support upon the interior surface of the container being sealed Fig. 3 represents a sectional view taken along the line III-HI of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 represents a sectional view taken along the line IVIV of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 represents a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line V-V of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 represents a fragmentary sectional view to enlarged scale of the sealing head incorporated in the mechanism shown in Fig. 1 at the completion of a closure-applying operation, pressure being maintained on said head;

Fig. 7 represents a plan view of the resilient pressure-applying or sealing disc used in the preferred practice of my invention;

Fig. 8 represents a sectional elevation taken along the line VIIIVIII of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 represents a planview of a modified form of resilient pressure-applying or sealing disc by means of which the methods of my invention may be practiced;

Fig. 10 represents a sectional elevation taken along the line X-X of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 represents a sectional elevation through another modified form of resilient pressure-applying or sealing disc by means of which the methods of my invention may be practiced and which is more general in its adaption than the sealing discs shown in Figs. 8 and 10;

Figs. 12 to 17 inclusive represent various bottle and/or tumbler glass finishes to which preformed fragile closures may be applied in accordance with the principles of my invention;

Fig. 18 represents, in sectional elevation, a

sealing head incorporating the pressure-apply ing disc shown in Fig. 10 as applying a fragile, metallic foil closure to the bottle finish illustrated in Fig. 13;

Fig. 19 represents, in sectional elevation, a sealing head incorporating a modification of the pressure-applying disc shown in Fig. 11 as applying a deep-skirted fragile, metallic foil closure to a standard milk bottle finish.

Similar reference characters refer to like elements throughout the following description and in the drawings.

While the invention may be used in connection with many diiferent container variations, it will herein be described with particular reference to the container and closure illustrated in connec tion with the closure mechanism in Figs. 1 to 9 inclusive.

The invention is predicated upon a method and apparatus for applying inherently fragile and flexible metal foil closures, comprising a top or body portion and a skirt portion, to the various v glass finishes of. containers, which method comprises resiliently pressing a portion of the body portion of said closure into close contact with the surface of the glass finish of the container and simultaneously or immediately thereafter resiliently and downwardly rolling the skirt portion of said closure into close and smooth conformity with the exterior surface of the glass finish of said container. In the more preferred form, the methods of my invention comprise applying and securing a preformed metal foil closure to the glass finish of a containerby means of exerting a resilient pressure interiorly of the open end of the container to support the same and compress the closure into close conformity with the container opening interiorly thereof, and simultaneously, resiliently and downwardly rolling the cap into close conformity with the glass finish of the container opening exteriorly thereof. These and other methods of the invention will now be explained with reference to the apparatus shown in the drawings.

Referring to the drawings, the closure-applying mechanism illustrated therein comprises a base member or portion Ill having a vertical standard I I formed integral with and terminating at its upper end in a suitable boss I2 provided with a bearing or bore l4 substantially centered with respect to the base. A shaft or stem I5 reciprocally mounted within the bore I4 is actuated through the medium of the rack teeth l6 by the action of a pinion formed on the cross shaft l8, which operates within the bore l1, extending through the boss I2. A shaft-locking and adjusting member in the form of a plate 20 pivotally attached to a machined surface on the boss l2, by means of a set screw 2|, is adapted to enter the peripheral groove 22in the exteriorly extending end of the shaft l8 whereby the shaft is locked or restrained against axial movement and the engagement of the pinion teeth l9 and the rack teeth I6 is insured, as is likewise a definite relationship between the base l0 and the elevation of shaft l5 for any and all positions of the'pinion I9. An operating lever or handle 24 secured to the extending end of shaft I8 provides means for rotating the pinion l9 and reciprocating the shaft [5. The lever is preferably constructedfrom suitable flexible material, such as spring steel, and in the apparatus 0 shown 'a loop 25 is provided intermediate the ends of the handle to insure such flexibility that the handle will yield under pressure.

A sealing head represented in entirety by the reference character 26 is detachably secured to the lower end of shaft [5. The head comprises a cylindrical cup-shaped housing having a top portion 21 and 9. depending cylindrical skirt portion 28. A boss 29 integral with the top portion and provided with a suitable bore 30 provides means for receiving the undercut lower end l3 of the shaft I5. A set screw 3i threaded into the boss 29 and extending therethrough enters an annular groove 32 provided in the shaft l5, thus constituting a detachable mounting for the sealing head. The interior of the sealing head is formed withan annular groove 34 adjacent the lower edge of the skirt 28. This groove terminates in a relatively small inturned flange 35 on the extreme bottom edge of the skirt and the upper edge of said groove curves inwardly as at 36 into tangential coincidence with the interior thickened wall 31 of the sealing head housing.

Within the groove 34 there is retained, by means as that of the groove 34. While, in accordance with the principles of the invention, this disc may take different forms, in the form here shown the disc swells appreciably from the flange 39 into a bulbous formation 4|] of substantially circular cross section, said bulbous portion being attached to the main body portion 4| of the disc through a reduced section formed by the grooves 42. A central disc aperture 43 insures maximum flexibility of the body portion of the disc and in order to allow contraction, the periphery of the sealing disc is provided with a plurality of radial slots 44 which extend to an appreciable distance within the bulbous portion 48.

Adjacent the base ID, the closure-applying assembly is provided with a container-centering device which may take any suitable form but is herein shown in the form of cap screws 45 which extend through threaded apertures in webs 46 formed integral with the base and the standard ll. Lock nuts 41 provided on the threaded shanks of the bolts 45 provide means for locking the same in adjusted position. A resilient pad 48 on the base l insures a resilient support for the container supported thereon during the capapplying operation.

The operation of the improved closure-applying mechanism just described will be explained with reference to a container of the type shown in Figs. 1, 5, and 6. This container, 50, is of glass and has a relatively thin wall. Adjacent its open end it is almost devoid of means upon which to lock a closure, except for the relatively small bead 55. By means of the centering screws 45 the axis of the container is aligned with that of the sealing head 26, and upon the open end of the container is placed a fragile metal foil cap, in this instance having a depressed central portion 52, designed to contact with the minimum diameter of the interior of the container opening, and a coextensive grooved flange 53 and depending skirt 54 which loosely enclose the bead 55 and an exterior portion of the container below said bead. The sealing head 2'6 is lowered from the position shown in dotted lines (Fig. 1) wherein the operating lever 24 abuts against the lug 56 formed integral with the standard I i, into a position whereinthe head is supported by the loosely capped container (Figs. 1 and 5). In this position the operating lever 24 should extend substantially horizontally, and if such is not the case, such positioning may be obtained by a proper manipulationof the plate 28 and the relative rotation of the pinion [9 with respect to the rack 16. Pressure is now applied to the handle 24 with the following results. First, the closure is resiliently pressed against the -glass finish of the container interiorly the opening thereof, the central portion 4! of the sealing disc providing a resilient support within the open end of the container 58 and also compressing the closure into close conformity with the'interior of the glass finish. Immediately thereafter 0r simultaneously therewith the sealing disc 38 is interrupted in its downward movement and progressively assumes a configuration such as that shown at Fig. 6, the bulbous portion 46 being progressively rolled by the deforming downward action of the sealing head 26 into close contact with the skirt of the closure, thereby resiliently and downwardly rolling the skirt of said closure into close and smooth conformity with the bead 55 and the exterior wall of the container immediately below said bead. During this sealing operation air entrapped within the sealing head escapes through the apertures 43 and 59.

Referring specifically to the particular manner in which the sealing head functions in performing a sealing or closure-applying operation on a thin-blown glass tumbler, it will be noted that the groove 42 of the pressure-applying disc 38 (Fig. 5) coincides with and loosely receives the grooved flange 53 of a cap supported upon the open end of a container, the groove 42 being properly selected to accommodate the maximum and minimum commercial glass finishes. As the pressure is applied by lowering the handle irom its horizontal position (Fig. 1), the sealing disc 38 is deformed by the curved portion 36 (Fig. 6) of the sealing head bearing upon the bulbous portion 48 thereof, and the upper surface of the disc 38 coming in contact with the interior flat machined surface 58 of the sealing head. This action causes the interior portion 4! of the disc to enter and resiliently clamp or compress the central depressed portion of the closure into close conformity and contact with a substantial portion of the interior surface of the glass finish of the container 50, the interior contact between the closure and glass finish, in the particular illustration in Fig. 6, terminating approximately in a plane intersecting the bead 55 on its horizontal diameter. The bulbous portion 40 simultaneously compresses the material of the closure constituting the annular grooved flange 53 and depending skirt 54 into close contact with the exterior glass finish and any minute irregularities incorporated therein, and a portion of the tumbler wall below said glass finish, by a downward rolling action which progressively and resiliently smooths the closure into close conformity with the exterior glass finish of the container. Against this exterior pressure created by the downward rolling action of the bulbous portion 48 the tumbler is resiliently supported interiorly of its opening by the central depressed portion 4| of the pressure-applying disc, which function of the sealing disc 38 insures against fracture of the relatively thin-walled tumbler. During this rolling operation or deformation of the disc 38 into cap sealing position (Fig. 6), the periphery of the disc is of necessity contracted by compression and recedes from the groove 34. The slots 44 function to assist this contraction and thereby insure a closer contact between the glass finish and the cap, resulting in less pressure being required to perform a closure-applying operation.

The preferred method above described and employed in performing a closure-applying operation comprises the steps of providing a cap which loosely embraces the opening in a container exteriorly and interiorly thereof. Thereafter pressure is applied to said cap and container by means of a resilient pressure-applying disc which engages the cap interiorly and exteriorly of said container opening, the applied pressure being initially applied coincident with the axis of the container, but through the formation of the sealing head and rubber sealing disc, resolved into a compressive force which rolls the peripheral portion of the pressure-applying disc downwardly into smooth, close conformity with the container finish. It will be readily appreciated that the rolling action of the bulbous portion of the rubber pressure-applying disc compresses the material of the cap into close contact with the exterior portion of the bead and that portion of the container below the same, whereas thecentral portion of the disc applies as resilient pressure against that portion of the closure in contact with the interior portion of the glass finish of the container opening and resiliently supports the same against breakage. The pressure applied by the pressure-applying disc is therefore normal to the glass finish surrounding the container opening at all points, the arc of contact between the closure and bead being greater than 180 (Fig. 6).

Referring to Fig. 12, a fragmentary view of a tumbler 68 is shown having a flared glass finish 6| adjacent its open end. A closure 62 similar to that described in connection with tumbler 58 is secured interiorly and exteriorly to the glass finish of tumbler 60, the apparatus shown in Fig. 6 being adaptableto the closure-applying operation providing the annular groove 42 permits embracing the closure and glass finish in the manner described heretofore in connection with tumbler Up to thispoint, in the explanation of the invention, a method and apparatus have been described in connection with the application of fragile, metallic foil closures to relatively wide mouth containers or receptacles, such as tumblers, which are characterized by their inherent weakness and, which are furthermore substantially free from glass finishes incorporating abrupt formations or other closure-securing means adjacent their open ends. .It is within the realm of this invention, however, to apply closures of the general type previously described to a variety of receptacles incorporating various other forms of glass finishes of which Figs. 13 to 17 inclusive are exemplary. In these examples the receptacles are relatively heavy as compared to thin-blown glass tumblers, but the method and apparatus previously described are readily adaptable to operation on such containers.

Referring in more particularity to Figs. 13 through 16, receptacles are shown to which closures, having top portions 64 and depending skirts 65, are secured. These closures are of the same general type as that shown in Fig. 6 and are constructed with an annular groove 66 in their top surfaces which provides a contacting portion on the interior surface of each of the re ceptacles adjacent the open ends thereof.

The application of the closures to the receptacles illustrated in Figs. 13 to 16 inclusive is accomplished by means of employing the resilient pressure-applying or sealing disc 61 illustrated in Figs. 9, 10, and 18. Herein the sealing disc is provided witha body portion '68 and a depending flange 69 which terminates in a bulbous portion 10'. As in the case of the sealing disc shown in Figs. 7 and 8, radial slots H and a central aperture 12 are provided. The interior upper surface of the sealing disc 61 is concave, as at 13, and an annular groove 14 and relief groove 15 are provided adjacent the depending flange 69 and on the interior surface thereof. As will be manifest from Fig. 18, the closure-applying operation, with respect to the various glass finishes illustrated in Figs. 13 through 16, is similar to that described in connection with Fig. 6, the closures being resiliently compressed interiorly the receptacle openings, by means of the particular concave portion E3 of the sealing disc 61, which conforms with the annular grooves 66 in the top surfaces of the closures, and the depending skirts 65 of the closures are simultaneously and progressively rolled downwardly, by means of the bulbous portion I0, under the action of the sealing head 16. Although the sealing operation' shown in Fig. 18 is specific to the receptacle shown in Fig. 13, and the annular groove 14 within the sealing disc 61 is constructed in a form suitable to embrace the particular glass finish of the receptacle of Fig. 13, it will be quite obvious to those versed in this art that the selection of the particular form of sealing disc will be governe'd by the glass finish with which it is to be employed. It is desirable, however-,in the case of relatively heavy receptacles, to provide a relief groove, such as 15 (Fig. 10), adjacent the bulbous portion of the resilient sealing disc, particularly where the glass finish is of anabrupt nature and the rolling deformation of the bulbous portion of the sealing disc is extreme as compared with the action of the sealing disc in the preferred form of the invention (Fig. 6).

In Figs. 11 and 17 a resilient sealing disc and fragmentary portion of a sealed receptacle are from that shown in Fig. 10 in that it is provided with a fiat interior surface 80. In other respects the sealing disc 19'and its method of operation are similar to those previously described, the closure being resiliently compressed against the glass finish adjacent its top surface and simultaneously and resiliently rolled downwardly into close conformity with the exterior surface of the glass finish. Fig- 19 discloses a fragmentary view of a closure-applying mechanism-in which the method above described is carried out in connection with a milk bottle glass finish and a deep-skirted, fragile, metallic foil closure. Herein a sealing disc 8| similar to that shown in Fig. 11, but having a longer flange 82, is employed, the closure being resiliently compressed upon the top surface of the glass finish, as at 83, and the deep skirt 84 simultaneously and resiliently rolled into close conformity with the exterior glass-finish and an appreciable portion of the exterior surface or neck of the bottle below the glass finish.

Heretofore containers or receptacles having abrupt and sharp finishes, such as those disclosed in Figs. 13 to 17 inclusive, were usually sealed by means of relatively heavy metal closures, or other types of closures, the depending skirts of which were spun or rolled into conformity with the glass finishes by a suitable tool adapted to operate in a plane at right angles to the axes of the containers. In some cases resilient pressure-applying rings were also employed for the purpose of radially compressing the skirts of closures into conformity with the exterior surfaces of container finishes. It will be readily seen, however, that closures made from fragile, metallic foil material, as contemplated by this invention, would not withstand a spinning or rolling operation applied in a plane at right angles to the axis of the container, to which such a closure was being applied, in view of the disastrous tearing and shearing effect of torsion applied to the skirt relative to its top portion. Furthermore, a radially applied compressive force, such as applied by a compres-- sion ring, does not insure the ironing and smoothing ,of. the skirt material into close conformity with the glass finish of the container, as is possible with the methods and apparatus contemplated by this invention.

In this connection the resilient pressure on the top surface of a fragile metal foil closure, whether this pressure be applied interiorly of a container opening or at an exterior point on the top surface of the closure adjacent the skirt thereof, com- I bined with the simultaneous and resilient downward rolling of the skirt of the closure into close conformity with the exterior glass finish of the of the exterior container finish. With the apparatus and methods herein described the fragile applied to the closures is plastic in nature and resolves itself from an original vertical pressure through the vertical axis of a container and closure to a pressure which is substantially normal at all points of contact of a closure with its container. The initial pressure on a sealing disc plastically engages the closure in contact with its container upon an upper surface thereof, and subsequent simultaneous pressure rolls the edge portion of the disc into plastic engagement with the depending skirt of the closure. The initial plastic engagement, in View of the form of the sealing discs above described, is relatively immovable, the bulbous edge portion of the disc exerting a rolling plastic pressure against the depending skirt of the closure. Having thus described and explained the invention and its manner of operation, it is to be understood that the particular apparatus selected was merely for purposes of illustration and that modifications in the form and arrangement of parts shown and described herein may be made without departing from the nature and scope of the invention except as defined in the claims appended hereto.

What I claim is:

1. The method of applying a fragile metal foil closure to the glass finish of a container which comprises plastically pressing a portion of the closure into close conformity with the container finish interiorly thereof, and simultaneously, plastically and resiliently rolling the skirt of the closure downwardly and inwardly into close conformity with the exterior glass finish of the container, whereby the closure is resiliently held in contact with the container finish interiorly thereof and the closure skirt is progressively rolled downwardly and inwardly into close conformity with the exterior finish of the container.

2. The method of applying a closure to a container having a glass finish adaptedto support a closure having a central depressed portion extending into said container and a coextensive grooved flange and depending skirt adapted to embrace the glass finish of the container, which comprises resiliently and plastically pressing the central depressed portion of the closure into close conformitywith the glass finish interiorly thereof, simultaneously applying a substantially nor-- formity with the bead interiorly of the container opening, simultaneously applying a substantially normal plastic pressure directly upon the coextensive grooved flange, and plastically rolling the depending skirt downwardly and inwardly into close conformity with the bead and the container below the bead exteriorly of said opening.

4. The method of securing a fragile, metallic foil closure to the glass finish of a container which comprises exerting a resilient and plastic pressure interiorly the glass finish to support the same and compress a portion of a closure supported thereon into close conformity with the glass finish interiorly thereof, simultaneously applying a substantially normal plastic pressure directly upon the top surface of the closure to press the same into close conformity with the glass finish thereof, and resiliently rolling a skirt portion of said closure progressively downwardly and inwardly into close conformity with the glass finish exteriorly thereof.

5. In a closure-applying mechanism, a sealing head adapted to be reciprocated toward and away from a container having a closure loosely applied to its open end, plastic means within said sealing head for simultaneously engaging said closure adjacent a top and side surface thereof, said plastic means being adapted to relatively immovably engage and apply a direct and substantially normal pressure upon the top surface of the closure to compress the same into close conformity with the container opening, and means incorporated in said sealing head and adapted to engage the plastic means to plastically roll the side surface of the closure into close conformity with the container below said top surface.

6. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head adapted to move toward or away from a container in the process of applying a closure to the glass finish of an opening in said container, resilient means for reciprocating said sealing head, a plastic pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, and means associated with said sealing head adapted to exert a substantially normal pressure upon the plastic disc to relatively immovably engage and compress the closure into close conformity with the top surface of the container. glass finish, and means incorporated in said sealing head for simultaneously deforming a peripheral edge of the plastic disc to roll a portion of the closure into close conformity with the container below said glass finish.

'7. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head adapted'for movement toward or away from a container in the process of applying a closure to an opening in said container, resilient means for reciprocating said sealing head, a resilient pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said pressure-applying disc having a bulbous peripheral portion coextensive with its central portion and separated therefrom by an annular groove, and means incorporated in said sealing head and adapted on the application of pressure applied to said head to roll the closure into close conformity with said container opening.

8. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head, said sealing head being adapted to be moved toward and away from a container having a closure loosely supported upon its open end, means for reciprocating said sealing head, a pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said pressureapplying disc being formed with an annular groove adapted to loosely embrace the closure supported upon the container opening, and means associated with said sealing head whereby pressure applied thereto rolls the pressure-applying disc into close conformity with the closure to apply the same to the container opening.

9. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head, said sealing head being adapted to be moved toward and away from a container having a closure provided with a centrally depressed portion extending into the open end of the container anda coextensive grooved flange and skirt loosely embracing the container opening, a pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said disc having a central body portion substantially'the same dimensional size as the centrally depressed portion of the closure, and a bulbouspe'ripheral portion separated from the central portion by a groove adapted, to loosely embrace the-grooved flange of the closure and the container opening, said pressure disc on application of pressure applied thereto, by the sealing head, being adapted to compress the closure into close conformity with the container opening exteriorly and interiorly thereof.

10. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head, said sealing head being adapted to be moved toward and away from a container having a closure provided with a central depressed portion extending into the open end of. the container and a coextensive grooved flange and skirt loosely embracing the container opening, a stem attached to said sealing head, a pinion engaged with teeth formed on said stem, a handle for rotating said pinion and 3 thereby reciprocating said stem, said handle being providedwith a loop intermediate its ends to impart flexibility thereto, a pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said disc having a central body portion substantially the same dimensional size as the centrally depressed portion of the closure, and a bulbous peripheral portion separated from the central portion by a groove adapted to loosely embrace the grooved flange of the closure and the container opening, said pressure disc on application of pressure applied thereto, by the sealing head, being adapted to compress the closure into close conformity with the container opening exteriorly and interiorly thereof.

11. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head, said sealing head being adapted to be moved toward and away from a container having a closure provided with a central depressed portion extending into the ,open end of the container and a coextensive grooved flange and skirt loosely embracing the container opening, a stem attached to said sealing head, a pinion engaged with teeth formed on said stem, a handle for rotating said pinion and thereby reciprocating said stem, said handle being provided with a loop intermediate its ends to impart flexibility thereto, a pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said disc having a central body portion substantially the same dimensional size as the centrally depressed portion of the closure, and a bulbous peripheral portion separated from the central portion by a groove adapted to loosely embrace the grooved flange of the closure and the container opening, said pressure disc having radial sl ts in its peing head for engaging the closure interiorly and exteriorly of said container opening, meanswlthin said sealing head for engaging the plastic deformable means in a closure-applying operation,

said engaging means being adapted for engagement with the plastic means to exert a plastic pressure upon the closure interiorly of said container opening and simultaneously roll the closure into close conformity exteriorly of the container opening.

13. A closure-applying mechanism comprising a reciprocally mounted sealing head, said sealing head being adapted to be moved toward and away from a container having a closure provided with a centrally depressed portion extending into the open end of the container and a coex tensive grooved flange and skirt embracing the glass finish around said container opening, a resilient pressure-applying disc within said sealing head, said disc having a central body portion adapted to extend into the centrally depressed portion of the closure, and said disc having a bulbous peripheral portion separated from the central portion by a groove adapted to embrace the grooved flange of the closure and the glass finish of the container, saidsealing disc on applioation of pressure applied thereto, by the sealing head, being adapted to resiliently compress the centrally depressed portion of the closure into close conformity with the glass finish interiorly thereof and resiliently support the container against the simultaneous pressure exerted by the bulbous portion of the disc exteriorly the glass finish.

14. A plastic disc for applying closures to containers having a central body portion substantially the same dimensional size as a centrally depressed portion of a closure, a =bulbous peripheral portion separated from said central portion by a groove adapted to loosely embrace a grooved flange coextensive with said closure, said plastic disc, upon application of pressure thereto, being adapted to compress the closure into close conformity with a container opening exteriorly and interiorly thereof.

15. The method of securing a fragile closure to the glass finish of a container, which comprises applying a plastic pressure to'the portion of a closure to compress the same into close conformity with the glass finish interiorly of" the opening of the container, simultaneously applying a substantially normal plastic pressure directly upon a top portion of the closure to inwardly into close conformity with the glass finish of the container exteriorly of said opening,

EMERSON E. HOGG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3537234 *Nov 7, 1967Nov 3, 1970Continental Can CoContainer cap construction
US4362002 *Jul 1, 1980Dec 7, 1982Metal Box LimitedMethod and apparatus for closing a thin-walled container body
US4625498 *Mar 25, 1985Dec 2, 1986Sealright Co., Inc.Apparatus for applying recessed membrane seals to containers
US4628669 *Jul 19, 1985Dec 16, 1986Sewell Plastics Inc.Method of applying roll-on closures
US4813557 *Jul 19, 1985Mar 21, 1989Sewell Plastics Inc.Pasteurizable container closure
US4912905 *May 16, 1988Apr 3, 1990Eti-Tec Maschinebau GmbhContact pressure element for metal foil blanks laid around the neck and head of bottles in a labelling machine
US7410070 *Aug 17, 2005Aug 12, 2008Stephen James WilliamsFeed bottles for babies
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/488, 53/362
International ClassificationB67B3/10
Cooperative ClassificationB67B3/10
European ClassificationB67B3/10