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Publication numberUS2086757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 13, 1937
Filing dateApr 10, 1929
Priority dateApr 10, 1929
Publication numberUS 2086757 A, US 2086757A, US-A-2086757, US2086757 A, US2086757A
InventorsWilliams Harrison R
Original AssigneeWilliams Harrison R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for manufacturing absorbent pads
US 2086757 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Em? PADS H. R. WILLIAMS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING ABSO'RB Filed April 10,1929 4 Sheets-Sheet 1' v INVENTOR fiarrlsarllfml/l'a'm-i ATTORNEYS" ENT PADS' July 13, 1937. H WILLJAMS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING ABSORB 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed AprillO, 1929 ENT PADS J 1ly13, 11937. i H. R. WILLIAMS :METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACT RING ABSORB Filed April 10, 1929 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 s Rm Y m 0 vW r n man A 0 r m July 13, 1937. H. R.IWILLIAMS 2,086,757

METHOD AND APPARATU Filed A ril 10, 1929 5 FOR MANUFACTURING AB SORBENT PADS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INvEm'pR Huff/500R. Will/mm.

ATTORNEYQ 5 that ent'ers the pad so that the fluid Pat nted July 13,1937

' METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR. MANUFAC- v TUBING ABSORBENT PADS Application April 10,1929, Serial 23 Claims.

, ."jThe present invention relates pad within the wrapper, the pad consistingof a material which is readily disintegrable inwater and'maytherefore be readily the household plumbing system. [While some of the vention are applicable to all types of napkins that fall under the above description, these features are disclosed herein as applied to a napkin which utilizes loosely-felted fibrated wood pulp as the absorbent material. It is to be understood, however, that these-features are not to be limited by the "present disclosure; Persons skilled in the kins; One of the featuresof the presentin'vention resides in providing a method for the' continuous manufacture of such napkins and providing a layer of circumfusing material disposed interiorly of the pad the circumfusing material serving to absorb and spread laterally of the pad the fluid is held inte-;

riorly ofthe pad and will not pass to the under face of the'pad or napkin.

Another object of the present invention is to embody interiorly of the pad a deodorizing or dis- "rnaterial. The deodorizing material is p, applied during the process of manufacture ofthe pad in such a manner that it is retained interiorly of the pad.

The manner of applica'tionof the deodorizing preferab 35 material and of the circumfusing material is such that the circumfusingrnaterial, 'which rnay be in the form of a starchsolution or the like, serves toqretain the deodor'izing material, which is usually in the form of a powder, within the pad '40 arid serve'sto prevent? the powder from losing its 50 user of way out of thepad in the process of packaging and transportation of the napkins. a Another feature of the present invention is to construct a pad of the type-described having its 5 sidesa'nd lower face provided with a water repellant material so as to further obviate the possibility of any of the fluid which has entered the pad, from passing out of its lower face-or sides. In order to prevent such napkins'the napkinthat' constitutes an embodiment provided with indicia which the user the waterproofed face clearly. indicates to of the napkin.

Another object of the invention isto provide 5 methods and apparatus for economically manuto an improved absorbent sanitary napkin of the type which comprises aflgauze wrapperand' an absorbent disposed of through features of the presentin illustrated in the accompanying drawings art will beable to applyany of the features of the presentinvention to. all" types of sanitary nap any possible errors by the of the present invention is also :inorder to showv the structure 'I larrison Williams, New YorkpN. Y.

facturing the napkin of the characterdescribed, One of the features of the methods and appara-' tus resides inthe fact that the introduction of thedeodorant and the circumfusing material and the application of the indicia and of the waterproofing treatment, are conducted in such a manner that they do not interfere with the continuous production of the napkins;

A preferred embodiment of the invention is which I constitute part. of the present application, the

illustrate such embodimentand are not to be understood as limiting the invention to any specific form or any specific porherein. Many modifications of my invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art, the scopein the appended claims.

In the drawings: v v

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of that portion of the apparatus which shows the formation of a duplex webv of fibrated wood pulp having disposed interiorly thereof a deodorant, circumfusing material, and a strip of gauze reinforcingmaterial.

Fig. 1a is a modified form of the apparatus shownin Fig. 1. j

Fig.2 is a side elevation apparatus to which the duplex the portion shown in Fig. apparatus showing; the application of several layers of sheeted cellulose to the duplex web or absorbent material and also showing the manner of the portionnof the web is fed from 1, this portion of the inwhich the sheeted cellulose iswrapped around the duplex web.

Fig. 3' is a side elevation of, a third portion of thisportion of the apparatus succeeding portions of the web are severed and these are wrapped in gauze. v I

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of a fourth portion of the apparatus which shows the last step of the process wherein the gauze covering is severed at the points intermediate the pads contained therein. r

Fig. 5 is adiagr ammatic view of the lower web of absorbent material.

Fig. 6 is a side view of the complete'dnapkin.

Fig. '7 is a plan. view of the napkin with the ends unfolded and broken off and certain portions of-the several layers thereof broken away in detail. transverse section of the completed 8--8of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a napkin taken on the line duplex strip covered 7 during its Fig. 9 is a plan view of the sheet cellulose covering as it would appear as unfolded from the p Fig. 10 is a sectional view on line ill-l0 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 11 is a diagrammatic view of the relationship of Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4.

While many features of the present invention may be applied to napkins whose absorbent pads may be made of a large variety of materials, the absorbent and readily disintegrable material utilized in the construction of napkins as shown herein is fibrated wood pulp. This material is soft; fiuily, short-fibered and has highly absorptive qualities and is readily disintegrable in water. The fibrated wood pulp may be manufacmanner desired and is then fed into the bicameral receptacle shown sisting of the two chambers or conduits 2 and 2a through the pipe 3.

The partition 3a into the two conduits 2 and 2a is preferably mounted so that it may be adjusted vertically and thereby control the amount of fibrated wood pulp that enters the two conduits or chambers 2 and 2a. For this purpose the partition 3a is provided with integral base portions 4, each of these portions carrying a bolt which passes through a slot in the wall of the pipe 3, the slot being covered on the exterior of the pipe 3.by the elongated cap 5. While it is generally desirable to make the two webs of substantially the same thickness the movable partition 3a is provided to vary the amount of flow of fibrated wood pulp into the conduits 2 and 2a respectively when it is desired to counteract the effect of gravity upon the wood pulp. Moreover, it may sometimes be desirable to vary the relative thickness of the webs. Under such conditions the vertical adjustment of the partition 3a will provide for the proper distribution of the fibrated wood pulp.

Two conduits and la lead from a suction pump (not shown) to the chambers 2 and 211 respectively. Endless belt 6', preferably formed of wire mesh, passes through the chamber 2. This belt may be actuated in any well known manner as by power applied to the roller 22. The belt is also provided with idler rollers 8 and 9 and'with a tightening roller l0. 1 The suction created through conduit l causes a continuous layer 20 of loose fibrated wood pulp to be deposited upon the wire mesh conveyor belt dur-" ing its passage through the chamber 2. l

A similar apparatus cooperates with the chamber 2a. A similar endless belt 6a also preferably formed of wire mesh passes through chamber 2a. The belt 6a may be actuated by power applied to the roller la and is provided with an idler 8a and a tightening pulley Illa.

The suction created through conduit Ia causes a continuous layer 20a of loose fibrated wood pulp to be deposited upon the wire mesh belt 6a passage through the chamber 2a. In order to retain this layer of fibrated wood pulp in position on the under side of belt 6a, a supporting belt H is provided to cooperate with the belt 6a, the supporting belt being actuated by power applied to pulley l2. The belt II is provided with an idler roller l3 and with a tightening roller H which lever Ha pivoted at end by 16a.

is carried by'one end of the lid and weighted at its other In order to completely seal the prevent the ingress of atmospheric air, the chamberis provided with a plate H which is disposedimmediately behind the belt in Fig. l as conthat divides the receptacle I 6a at the point at which the belt leaves the interior of the chamber. This plate H cooperates with the belt i I and with the resilient plate 12 mounted on the outside of the chamber and pressing against the roller l3 to prevent the ingress of atmospheric air. A gravity roller 12 is provided to cooperate with a similar plate 14 in the chamber 2 and with a similar resilient plate 15 on the outside of the chamber 2 so as to seal this chamber against the ingress of atmospheric air.

' It will be seen from the above that by means of the apparatus so far described two loosely felted webs of fibrated wood pulp 20 and 20a are continuously formed and withdrawn from the bicameral receptacle into which the fibrated wood pulp is fed; the web 20 being carried by the belt 6 and the web 200. being carried between the belts 6a and l I. These two webs are superby means of the device 2| and circumfusing material I8 is also applied thereto by means of the apparatus IS. .The deodorizing material which is preferably in the form of a dry powder is deposited continuously over the upper surface of the web 20. Any apparatus desired may be used for this purpose and the apparatus 2| shown as a conventional showing of any type of apparatus. It may for example contain a revolving dered material whereby the material is applied uniformly to the surface of the web.

The circumfusing material which may be in the nature of liquid starch is applied to the up-. per face of the web 20 after the deodorant has already been applied thereto. The starch therefore serves to entrap the powder and thereby placed centrally between the webs leaving marginal portions of adjacent faces of the web that are not covered by the gauze.

The two webs 20 and 20a, one of them having the deodorant and the liquid starch applied to one face, are superposed with the reinforcbetween the two webs at a 75 ing strip i6 disposed instead of being applied bath of starch solution H13 so or other circumfusing the apparatus tinuouslyon the under point adjacent to the roller la.- and at that point are merged to formthe duplex web 1 6. H V

Fig. 1a, shows another form of theapparatus shown in. Fig. 1. The apparatus shown in this figure is in all respects identical with that shown in Fig. l with only the modification that the starch solution or other circumfus'ing material to the face of the lower web 20. as in Fig. l, is applied to one face of the intermediate gauze" 16. For this purpose the gauze ,roll I5 is mountedat the point shown in Fig. 1a and the gauze passes over the guide roll 100,;(which as shown is placed at a slight angle in order to center the gauze) andbetween the rollers l0! and I02 which are associated wlththe I I that the starch material is applied to the lower face of the gauze IS, The gauz'e'f IG is then fed between the two webs'20a. and in the manner described 'hereinabove. When this form of is used the starch is applied conface of the gauze i6.

,. When the two webs are superposed to form the the roller 11 is lowered into power driven roll 22 posed immediately over ,diately over the roll 23, being duplex web' 16 the layer of gauze and starch serveto entrap the deodorant and to hold the same interiorly of the pad. j V

While Fig.5 shows 'the distribution of the starch when the apparatusshown in Fig. l is used, where the starch isapplied intermittently, it will be understood that whenFig. la is used the starch is continuous with the duplex web.

The duplexweb is fed by the belt 6 and the onto the endless belt 34 Fig. 2. A driven pressure roll 23 isdisthe roll 22. The vertical positionof theroll 23;,maybe varied for the purpose of adjusting the pressure between the two rolls and thereby determine the degree of packing and felting of the webs. The webs are, however, always left in the loosely felted condition sothat they remain readily disintegrable in water. An auxiliary pressure, roller 11 is disposed imme- S, thisroller 11, like roller also vertically adiustable. Under nor- -mal conditions theroller I1 is maintained in a shown in positionwhich clears the surface of the. duplex web 16 so that it does not enter into "the operation of the machine. Under some conditions, however, it is desired to apply some pressure to the duplex web 16 prior toits passage through the pressure roller'23. Under these conditions the desired pressure contact with the web 16 and is driven at the surface speed of the web so as to subject'the duplex web I6 to a preliminary compression.

It will be seen from the abovethat the duplex [web 16 leaves the apparatus shown in Fig. 1

after there is incorporated therein the desired amount of deodorant, the desired" amount of starch which is illustrative of the, circumfusing material andareinforcing gauze strip 16. I

While the duplex web16 in'thiscondition may if desired be severed into portions of desired length to correspond to the amount necessary for the finished napkinand then wrapped into the outer gauze wrapper, with an auxiliary wrapper of I prefer to 'providethe web readily disintegrable sheeted material such as sheeted cellulose which will give the pad added strength and consistency and will prevent any possibilityof'the pad disstorage and -trans-' integrating during packaging, portation. The apparatus in-Fig. 2 manner in which shows the plied to the continuous duplex "web I6. apparatus two'or more reels 21, 21a, carrying sheeted cellulose of the stripper rolls The two or more webs superposed, and for the purpose of the further description, willbe consideredas one web 80. If desired, a single reel having a web of the desired number of plies wound thereon, may be employed instead of the reels 21, 2111, etc. The'sheeted cellulose isfed by the feed belt which is actuated by power applied to the pulley 29. The feed belt is also carried overthe idler pulley 30', the pulleys 29 and 30 beingdisposed "at the, ends respectivelyof the table 8| over which theibelt 28 travels. The shafts 3| and Ma of. the respective reels 2l and-21a are supported-in slotted guides 32 and 320, so that, regardless oftheamount of 18 and 19 and the belt 28.

of sheeted; cellulose are are fed continuously by means 4 paper on the reel, it always rests on the feed belt.

g The web which is composed of two or more v layers ofsheeted cellulose passes over the spreader bar 8 I, between the rollers 82 and 83 and over the roller 84 and belt 34 which travels over 'thetable 24 "When the web 80 passes between the'rollers 82 and 83 parafhn or other water repellantis apof the web 80 andover a selected and predetermined portion thereof. paraffin reservoir provided with a heating element 86 and with 81 which transfers the paraflin to the marking roller 82. The cylindrical face of the marking roller 82 is preferably so shaped that it applies the parafiin only' to the desired portion of the web 80. Themarking portion of the roller 82 is preferably so designed that the paraffin is applied to the overlapping portions of the web 80 leaving the central portion of the 85 shows a over the duplex web of fibrat'ed wood pulp 16 the paraffined portions of the webcome in contact with one face of the web 16 and the lateral edges thereof leaving means fluid readily enters the pad onone face and'is prevented from passing outof the ,lower face of the pad. i

The web 80,

table 24, the web BO being disposed below the web .16. During its travel on thetable 2 the web 80 is first forced. into the trough 26, as is indicatedin Fig. 10. ,The projecting .edgesofthe web 80 are subsequently folded over the duplex strip of fibrated wood pulp in ner by means of plowshare folders or the like which are illustrated in Fig.2 schematically at 88. The power drivengbelt 25a cooperates with the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 3. I I

Referring to Fig. 3: after leaving belts 34, and 2511, the paper-covered strip offibrated wood pulp from which the pads are tobe formedis drawnto with its paraffined face uppermost, is carried by ,the belt 34, travelling over the a well known man belt 34 tOl carry the duplex web 15 wrapped with i the auxiliary wrapper 80 onto'theportion f the the right by intermittently acting cooperative feed belts'43 and'43a, driven by power actuated pulleys pulleys 45' and the belts75 44 and a and running over idler 45a, respectively. -The movement of tinuous, the interruption of readily distinguish the ervoir 81.

may be controlled in any well-known manner, as by automatically acting clutches alternately driving and interrupting the drive of power actuated pulleys 44 and 44a. The purpose of so intermittently feeding the wrapped strip is to. permit of cutting the pads therefrom. This is accomplished by means offthe punch 46 and the cooperating die 41, which cut from the strip pieces of the shape indicated by the reference numeral 48 (Fig. 5), thus providing a covered pad having rounded ends. The portions 48 fall through the tube 98. The feeding of belts 34-25a being conthe feed by belts 43-43a, in order to allow time for the punching of the pads, results in the formation of a loop in the strip, which loop is indicated by the reference numeral 45 (Fig. 3).

However, the feeding rate of belts 43-43a exceedsthat of belts 34-25a to such an extent that this slack is taken up by the next forward feeding movement of said belts 43--43a.

It will be noted from Fig. 3 that the pad, when separated from the strip by the action of the punch and die, overhangs the die. With the next forward movement of the strip, the pad is carried to the conveyor belt 50, which belt is drawn over a table 5| by a power actuated pulley 68 (Fig. 4). This conveyor belt is provided with idler pulleys 52 and 54a (Fig. 4). The function of the belt is to carry a strip of gauze upon which the pad is deposited, and to wrap the edges of such gauze about the pad.

The reel 55 supplies the gauze which constitutes the wrapper for the napkin. The gauze is fed under the severed portions 90 of absorbent material, the severed portions being placed on the belt 50 in spaced relation so as to permit sufficient gauze between the successive portions 80 to provide for the end flaps of the finished napkin. The gauze is guided onto the table 5! by rollers 9|, 92, 93, 94, and 95.

In view of the fact that one face of the finished napkin in its final form contains a protective layer of water repellant material it is necessary to providesome means on the napkin which will protected face from the unprotected face. The invention therefore providessuch an indication in the form of a colored printed stripe extending lengthwise of the gauze wrapper.

This stripe is formed by providing an inking roller 96 which is partly immersed in an ink res The strip of wrapper gauze passes over the inking roller 96 before it reaches the table 5|.

The table 5! is provided with a trough and folding plowshares indicated diagrammatically at 64 and 64a for folding ina well-known manner the sides of thegauze strip over the pad.

Upon leaving the table 5|, the continuous strip of gauze'wrapper, together with the pads inclosed thereby, passes through a shearing device (Fig. 4)

comprising a stationary cutter 65 and a rotating cutter 66 by which shearing device the gauze wrapper is cut into the desired length between the pads. The napkins assembled in the manner described are then carried by the conveyor belt 61 either to a folding table or to other apparatus 'for automatically folding the end flaps.

The'completed napkin is shown in the side elevation in Fig. 6, the gauze covering being indicated by reference numeral 63.

A top plan view of the completed napkin. drawn to a larger scale than Fig. 6, is shown in Fig. 7. Several layers of the napkin are indicated as broken away in order to illustrate the structural details. Reference numeral 63 indicates the gauze wrapper; the numerals 39 and 40 indicate the inner and outer webs of the auxiliary wrapper of sheeted. cellulose; the numeral I04 indicates the identifying color stripe. The numeral I 6 indicates the strip of reinforcing gauze and the reference characters 20 and 20a indicatethe two layers of fibratedwood pulp. The reference character 10 indicates the area over which the starch has been applied. 7 I f Fig. 8 shows a section on the line 8--8 of Fig. 6. In this view the deposit of deodorant and starch are indicated by the reference numeral 69 and the deposit of paraflin is indicated by the reference numeral 42.

Fig. 9 shows the auxiliary wrapper of sheeted cellulose 40 and the stippled area 42 shows the layer of paraffin or other water repelling agent.

As described above, the napkin is so constructed that the smooth face thereof is worn against the body of the wearer, thereby obviating the irritation'resulting from the contact of the overlapping portions against the body. For this reason the paraffin is applied to the inner face of the auxiliary wrapper in such a manner that the folded portions are rendered impervious to moisture. The central portion of the auxiliary wrapper, having a width substantially equal to the width of the web 16. is unparaffi ned, the marginal areas being parafiined, so that when the wrapper is folded over the web 15, the lateral edges as well as one face of the web is rendered impervious to moisture. If desired the portion that folds over first is parafiinedacross its entire area, while the other portion is paraffined only over that portion of unparaflined.

The colored stripe, which differentiates the impervious face of the napkin is also applied over the folded portion'of the gauze wrapper; or if desired two stripes may beprinted folded portion.

It is understood that if desired the paraffin may bev applied to the central portion of the auxiliary wrapper so that the smooth face and lateral stripe would then be applied centrally of the gauze web.

The color stripe or stripes on the gauze may be applied to the gauze as above desired they may be applied to the outer face of the auxiliary wrapper.

The color'stripe may also bea'pplied to either or both of the wrappers, when the web is being manufactured. Particularly, during the process of manufacture, colored thread may. be woven chambers in the form of two vertically spaced loosely felted webs, applying circumfusing mate- 7 upper face of said lower web, superposing said sorbent pad material, continuously feeding one or more webs of sheeted cellulose, subjecting one webs to form a duplex web of ab-,

70 to one face of one of said webs, superposing said webs to form a duplex web with the circumfusing I. i pads comprising the i oflpsaid duplex web, continuously feeding a web.

of gauze wrapping material, wrapping said, gauze about said severed portions andintermittently.

severing said gauze Lwrapper.

.2. :The continuous process of making sanitary steps of continuously feed ing, fibrated woodpulp into. a bicameral receptacle, continuously withdrawing said pulp from form of two loosely felted said chambers in the a duplexweb of absorbent pad material, con-I tinuously feeding one or more webs of sheeted cellulose of ,at leasttwicethewidth of theduplex web, wrappingsaidsheeted cellulose around said tently. severing said duplex web, intermittently severing portions of said duplex .web, continuously feedin-g'a web, of

exterior gauze wrapping material, wrapping said gauze about said severed. portions and intermitgauze wrapper. *1

r 3; The continuous process of making, sanitary pads comprising thesteps of continuously'feeding fibrated .wood pulp into a bicameral receptacle, continuously. withdrawing said pulp from each of said chamberstin'the form of two loosely felted webs, intermittently applying circumfusing mae terialover predeterminedareas of one face of one" of said webs, superposing said webs to form a duplex web of absorbentpad material,- continuously feeding one. or more webs of sheeted cellu 'loseof at least twice the width of the duplex web, wrapping said sheeted cellulose around said duplex web and intermittently severing portions.

of said duplex web. I

, 4; The process, of making sanitary pads com-- prising the steps of continuously feeding fibrated wood pulp into a bicameralqreceptacle', continuously withdrawing said pulp from eachof said' chambers .in the form, of'two loosely felted webs,

said pulp from each of said applying a deodorant continuously over. one face rial over limited portions applying a deodorant continuously over one face of one of said webs, applying circumfusing mate rial over limited portions of one face of one of said webs, superposing said webs to form a duplex web of, absorbent pad material, continuously feeding one or more ,webs' of sheeted cellulose,

wrapping'said sheetedcellulose aroundsaid duplex web andintermittently severing portions of said duplex web.

5. The process of malringsanitary pads comously withdrawing I chambers in the form oftwo loosely felted webs,

of one of said webs, applying circumfusing mateof one said webs,'superposi ng said webs to form a duplex web of absorbentpad materialpwithjsaid said" circumfusing material disposed interiorly'thereof, continuously feeding one. 'or' more webs of sheeted cellulose, wrapping said deodorant and sheeted cellulose around said duplex web and intermittently severing portions of said duplex web.

6. The process of making sanitary pads comprising the steps of forming two webs of absorbent pad material, applying circumfusing material material disposed interiorly thereof, associating with said duplex web a web of waterproofed sheeted cellulose, severing portions of said duplex be'rs, means for forming a loosely fi'occulent fibrous material on each of the opposface of one of oneof said webs, means for applying a circumfusing-agent to one of said webs, means for superposing said webs to form a duplex web, means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex web, means for render,- ing a" portion ofsaid sheeted material impervious to moisture, an intermittently operable cutter for severing portions of said duplex'web, means for intermittently feeding said duplex web to said cutter, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with saidsevered portions,"and an intermittently operable cutter for said gauze wrapper.

8. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising a bicameral receptacle, a conveyor belt passing through each of said chaming faces of said belts, means for applying a 'deodorizing agent to one of 'said webs, means for applying a circumfusing agent to one of said webs, means for superposing said webs to form a duplex wen-means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex web, means for'rendering a portion of said sheeted material impervious to moisture, an intermittently operable cutter forsevering portions of said duplex web, means for intermittently feeding said duplex web to said cutter, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and an intermittently operable cutter for said gauze wrapper;

9. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising a bicameral receptacle, a conveyor belt passing through'each of said chambers, means for forminga loosely felted web of fiocculent fibrous material on each of the opposing faces of said belts, means for applying a deodorizing agent to one of said webs, means for superposing said webs to form a duplex web, means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex web, means for rendering a portion of said sheeted material impervious to moisture, an intermittently operable cutter for severing portions of said duplex web, means for intermittently feeding said duplex web to said cutter, means'for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and an intermittently operable cutter for said gauze wrapper.

10. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising a bicameral receptacle, a conveyor belt passing through each of said chambers, means for forming a loosely felted web of felted web of belts, means for applying'a (16- 5 11. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising a .bicameral receptacle, a conveyor belt passing through each of said chambers, means for forming a loosely felted web of fiocculent absorbent material on each of the opposing faces of said belts, means for applying a circumfusing agent to one of said webs, means for superposing said webs to form a duplex web, means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex Web, a cutter for severing portions of said duplex web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

12. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising, means for forming a loosely felted web of fiocculent fibrous absorbent material, means for wrapping said web in sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material, a cutter for severing portions of said web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

13. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising means for forming a loosely felted web of fioccuient fibrous material, means for wrapping said web in sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material, means for rendering a portion of said sheeted material impervious to moisture, a cutter for severing portions ofsaid web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

14. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising means for forming a duplex loosely felted web of fiocculent fibrous material holding deodorizing material interiorly thereof,

means for wrapping said web in sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material, means for rendering a portion of said sheeted material impervious to moisture, a cutter for severing portions of said web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

15. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising means for forming a duplex loosely felted web of flocculent fibrous material having a stratum of circumfusing material disposed interiorly thereof, means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex web, a cutter for severing portions of said web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

16. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising means for forming a duplex loosely felted web of flocculent fibrous material, having a stratum of circumfusing material disposed interiorly thereof, means for associating sheeted absorbent and disintegrable material with said duplex web, means for rendering a portion of said sheeted material impervious to moisture,

a cutter for severing portions of said web, means for associating a continuous web of gauze wrapper with said severed portions, and a cutter for said gauze wrapper.

17. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins comprising means for forming a duplex loosely felted web of fiocculent fibrous material having a stratum of circum'i'using and deodorizing napkins, a bicameral receptacle for fioccuient fibrous material, a conveyor belt passing through each of said chambers, means, forforming. a loosely felted web of fiocculent fibrous material on each of the opposing faces of said belts, means for applying a deodorizing agentto one of said webs, means for applying a circumfusing agent to one of said webs, and means for superposing said webs to form a duplex web, having the deodorizing and circumfusing material held interiorly thereof.

19. In an apparatus for the manufactured sanitary napkins, a. bicameral, receptacle forfiocculent fibrous absorbent material, an endless conveyor passing through each of said chambers for forming two loosely felted webs of said material, means for applying deodorizing material toone face of one of said webs, and means for superposing said webs to form a duplex web having the deodorizing material held interiorly thereof.

20. In the continuous process of making sanitary napkins, the steps of forming a loosely felted web of flocculent, absorbent, readily disintegrable, cellu'losic material, feeding a web of sheeted absorbent readily disintegrable cellulosic material, rendering the marginal portions of said sheeted web impervious to moisture, associating said sheeted web with said first mentioned web,.and folding said marginal portions over said first mentioned web.

21. The process of making sanitary pads comprising the steps of. forming two webs of absorbent pad material, superposing said webs and interposing between said webs permeable sheeted material impregnated with circumfusing materlal, associating with said'webs waterproofed sheeted cellulose, severing portions of the duplex web, and wrapping said severed portions in a gauze wrapper.

22. Apparatus for the manufacture of sanitary napkins, comprising means for pneumatically feeding loose, fibrated material from a common source, means for dividing such material into two streams, means for forming the divided streams into separate webs or belts, and means for there after feeding the separate webs or belts into superposed relation to form a duplex web.

23. Apparatus as set forth in claim. 22, in which provision is made of adjustable means for controlling the proportion in which the fibrated material is divided between the two streams, and for thereby controlling the relative thicknesses of the webs formed.

HARRISON R. WILLIAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2466906 *Nov 23, 1946Apr 12, 1949Ransburg Electro Coating CorpMethod and apparatus for forming fibrous webs
US2578664 *May 8, 1947Dec 18, 1951Johnson & JohnsonSanitary napkin
US2698271 *Aug 13, 1949Dec 28, 1954Dick Co AbProduction of thick, laminated, fibrous structures
US2746895 *Jun 19, 1951May 22, 1956Wood Conversion CoManufacture of fibrer felts
US2771882 *Sep 23, 1952Nov 27, 1956Schickedanz Ver PapierwerkHygienic insertion for women
US2785728 *Nov 23, 1953Mar 19, 1957Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpArticle of manufacture and method and apparatus for producing same
US3058169 *Jul 16, 1956Oct 16, 1962Falls Paper & Power CompanyMethod and apparatus of forming batts and pads
US3086253 *Mar 18, 1957Apr 23, 1963Falls Paper & Power CompanyMethod and apparatus for producing fibrous batts
US3201295 *Jul 20, 1962Aug 17, 1965Woskin Irvin S DeMethod of and apparatus for manufacturing absorbent pads
US3271215 *Feb 27, 1961Sep 6, 1966Clark Charles FMethod of continuously forming reinforced resinous sheet material
US3469286 *Sep 19, 1967Sep 30, 1969Kimberly Clark CoMethod for fabricating compressed and folded absorbent tampons
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US4146564 *Jan 16, 1978Mar 27, 1979Armstrong Cork CompanyProcess forming a mineral wool fiberboard product
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US4598441 *Mar 15, 1985Jul 8, 1986Winkler & Dunnebier Maschinenfabrik Und Eisengiesserei Gmbh & Co. KgFor an internal combustion engine
US4764325 *May 28, 1986Aug 16, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyDiapers, pads, napkins; splitting single figer column into multiple fibers; drum type airlaying
US4765780 *May 28, 1986Aug 23, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for and method of providing a multiplicity of streams of air-entrained fibers
US4904440 *Jul 1, 1988Feb 27, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for and methods of airlaying fibrous webs having discrete particles therein
US4908175 *Aug 9, 1988Mar 13, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for and methods of forming airlaid fibrous webs having a multiplicity of components
US4917750 *Jan 20, 1988Apr 17, 1990Deutsche Rockwool Mineralwoll - GmbhMethod of and apparatus for manufacturing a mineral fiber insulating web
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Classifications
U.S. Classification156/62.2, 264/113, 604/359, 450/93, 156/62.8, 425/81.1, 156/464, 156/201
International ClassificationA61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/1565
European ClassificationA61F13/15M3F