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Publication numberUS2090871 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1937
Filing dateMar 23, 1937
Priority dateMar 23, 1937
Publication numberUS 2090871 A, US 2090871A, US-A-2090871, US2090871 A, US2090871A
InventorsHenry Kennedy William
Original AssigneeHenry Kennedy William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Turkey saddle
US 2090871 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 24, 1937. w. H. KENNEDY v 2,090,871

TURKEY SADDLE Filed March 25, 1937 2 Sheets-Shet 1 [1211622 tor W H. Kennedy Wm Hifiorneys.

1937. wpH. KENNEDY TURKEY SADDLE Filed March 23, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 InVen for. W. H. Kennecgy vi Hiiorneys Patented Aug. 24, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TURKEY SADDLE William Henry Kennedy, San Bernardino, Calif. Application March 23, 1937, Serial N0. 132,587

11 Claims. (Cl. 119-143) is then stitched to the back portion of the saddle adjacent the line joining the apron part by a line of stitching with the inturned folded edge portions facing towards the longitudinal back center of the saddle. This causes the formation of two ridges formed by the tape, one being between the back portion of the saddle proper and the underside of the tape, the other ridge or edge being between the two free edges of the issued January 15, 1935 and Boar'dman, No. tape which are-turned in and stitched together. 1,949,004, issued February 27, 1934. also Smith, For the purpose of illustrating my invention No. 2,006,118, issued June 25, 1935, the main as pplied t difl r n typ f s dl I how characteristics of such patents and their use beseveral different forms. The characteristics of ing known in the art. one form is that the wing encircling tape is so 1 Considerable objection has arisen particularly at d t th add a d d su fi t y with those raising turkeys for the market in that thi k and d. that t id s a fiat su n the turkey saddles now on the market are un- Contact W t the Wing J' t Of the tu y next satisfactory. A number of these saddles cause ii) the y- This flat surface dis utes e what are termed wing sores, this being due D1111 a rubbing 0f the W 0n the enc rc 21) t th wings being encircled by straps or the ,tape thus provided for the wing and materially wings fitted through penings or holes in the reduces the tendency towards what are termed saddle. Incidentally the fitting of the wing e sores- It has been found that w e res through an encircling tape or the like or through are quite often developed y t t p of poultry holes in the saddle, is relied on in a number of saddles now on the market and as the fowl have 25 the prior constructions to hold the saddle propa habit of picking at the sores. an pprec ab W m on the t k Again in certain number so afflicted get their heads worked of the prior art, the saddles or jackets have through the encircling strap Op P vided been made of a strip of canvas or equivalent mafor the Wings and strangle t es, thi terial which merely fits over the back and the Sometimes causing q te a ser ous oss in a flock 3Q sides of the turkey, the wings being positioned 0f f0Wi- .In this simple yp f my invention outside of the side coverings or apron part of the With the tape e c i the Wing. I D saddle. Therefore the apron covers the side of e -biy form the Wing e c i p as 3 orthe turkey under the wings and the main saddle ward continuation of the tapes stitched to the portion fits across the hack of the turkey. Cerhack portion of the Saddle- Therefore this y tain of these saddles of the prior art have pleats be made Of One long tapeother Characterextending longitudinally so that the pleats will isiic is that h binding on the lower e Of t e a be located along the part where the back sadapron is also a Continuation of the Wing dle part joins the apron portion. 'Inese pleats circling tape- This Construction therefore D are unsatisfactory in that the pleats sometimes vides for a relatively large Wing p gives an 4n become turned so that they do not form a firm improved fit of the blanket on the poultry and 40 ridge extending longitudinally of the saddle. .the saddle is maintained in its. proper position An object and characteristic of my turkey and this without resort to any. elastic portions in saddle is that I use tapes which are stitched to the tape or a tape or elastic member encircling the fabric such as canvas, forming the main porthe lower portion of the body or the breast of 15 tion of the saddle, these tapes extending lengththe fowl. wise of the back portion of the saddle and par- In another form of my invention, while I use 'allel one to the other. They are positioned equithe folded type of back tapes on the back portion distant from a center line through the longitlk of the saddle, I provide soft flat tapes which at dinal center of the back portion of the saddle. the front cross over each other and thus provide 5:) A further characteristic is that the tapes are a space between the forward edge of the saddle made of a folded strip of canvas usually someand the cross over of the tapes or straps for what heavier than that forming the saddle and the neck of the turkey. The continuation porapron portion proper. Such strip has a fold tion of the'straps or tapes connected to the foron one edge, and the two free edges of the strip ward edge of the apron part provide for the are turned in, making four thicknesses of fabric wings and thus when the wings are properly 55 adjacent one edge of the tape and two -thickthrust through these side portions of the overnesses adjacent the other edge. The material lapped tape forward of the front edge of the forming the tape is then stitched longitudinally apron part, the wings as they normally rest by one or more line of stitches in order to dealong the side of the fowl, hold the apron part of the blanket securely in position. This con- 60 velop a somewhat stiflf and firm tape. This tape struction materially reduces the danger of wing sores and is sufficiently loose across the upper part of the breast of the fowl that it does not annoy or worry the bird.

A further simple form of my turkey saddle made from canvas shaped to form the back and apron portions, the apron portions having openings or cutouts through which the wings are inserted. 'iiowever in the prior art it has been the custom in this type to provide a binding at the edge of these wing openings. Such binding strips develop a relatively stiff and somewhat sharp edge which causes the so-called wing sores. When these sores develop with this type of saddle, as the turkeys have a habit of picking at such sores, there is considerable loss through strangulation of the birds getting their. heads thrust through the openings and not being able to remove their heads from such openings at the wings and thus become strangled.

With my saddle, at the wing openings and the forward portion of the'saddle; I preferably make this of two or sometimes more thicknessesof fabric whereas the main portion of the saddle is only one thickness. The openings are then left with a rough edge from the cutting of the material and encircling stitches are positioned outwardly from the edge. Thus due to the two or three thicknesses and the rough or soft edge, there is little danger of the binding of the. wings through these openings developing wing sores. Another characteristic of this type of saddle is that the back portion which fits adjacent the neck has a decided concave curve extending well back from the forward edge of the wing openings so that this type of saddle does not: bind on the back of. the turkey's neck. The usual type of binding may be used on the edge. This type of saddle also has the characteristic tapes stitched to the back portion and running rearwardly from the wing openings, these tapes being parallel.

My invention is illustrated in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 shows the saddle having the construction of Fig. 2 illustrated in place on a turkey.

Fig. 2 is a developed plan of the saddle illustrated in Fig. 1, this'having the characteristics of the tapes attached to the back being continued and forming a bindingfor the bottom edges of the apron and the rear of the back'portion and also with the forward edges of the apron part forming loops or openings for insertion of the wings.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section through the saddle at substantially a mid-section illustrating the approximate shape when in place on a turkey. Fig 4 is a detail section on the line 1-4 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows to show the'cdnstruction and attachment of the longitudinal tapes to the back portion of the saddle.

Fig. 5 is a plan or developed view of a modified or alternative construction to that of Fig. 2 illustrating the loops for the wings as being formed of crossed-over tapes which form an extension of the binding on the lower edge of the apron and the forward edge of the apron section of the saddle. In this construction the crossed-over tapes are positioned on the forward part of the breast of the turkey.

Fig. 6 is a plan or developed view of a third alternative or modified form of saddle in which circular openings or perforations are provided for the wings, this-illustrating a'construction with the tapes on the back portion, extending longitudinally from the wing openings and the wing openings having a soft inner edge.

Fig. '7 is a longitudinal section on the line 1-1 of Fig. 6 in the direction of the arrows illustrating the manner of forming a soft edge of the circular opening for the wings.

Referring first to the construction of Figs. 2, 3 and 4, the saddle is formed of a complete single thickness of fabric, such as canvas. This may be considered as having a back or central portion I I and side aprons I2, the aprons being similar on each side. A straight transverse forward edge I! of the back portion is preferably a selvage edge of the canvas. The lower edge of the aprons and the rear edge I5 of the back panel I I are made in a sweeping continuous convex curve. There are also transverse forward edges I i on the apron parts, these having a concave curve I'l merging with the transverse end I3. A strip of overlapped binding I8 is stitched to the edges I6 and I1 and forms a somewhat soft forward edge.

The wing openings or loops 25 are formed by a somewhat still and flat tape 26 which extends forwardly from the front'edge I3 and then follows a curve indicated at 21 to the junction point 2! of the, binding tape I8 and the forward portion of the lower edge of the apron section. .The lower edge of the apron and the rear edge I 5 of the central panel have a folded hem 29. They also have a binding 30, this being a continuation of the tape 26 which follows the curve of the lower edge of the apron and the back portion I5 of the center panel I I.

An important characteristic of my invention resides in the longitudinal tapes 3!. These are shown in detail in Fig. 4. The tape is made up and consists of a strip of fabric such as somewhat stiifcanvas having a reverse fold 3 which forms one edge and two turned-in hem folds 31 and 38. The. edges of the hem folds indicated at 39 extend preferably more than one-half way towards the edge. 36, that is, considering the full width of the. tape. Such width is indicated by the measurement line III. Stitching ll and 42 secures the folded strip to form the tape and also to attach such tape to the back portion of the saddle approximately along the line where the apron sections I2 extend downwardly when the saddle is'fltted on a turkey. This construction develops a tape having the characteristic of a singlev edge 36 facingdownwardly when the saddle is in position on a fowl and the two edges 31 and It podtioned upwardly or facing towards the center of the back panel I I. On account of the portion of the tape between the stitching 4| and the two the binding 3Il'all from the same tape. This may be formed of a rather long tape, the two ends being indicated at n and stitched underneath the binding tape 30 at the rear end I! of the back panel II. There is a slight approaching curve 8 in these tapes where they merge with the binding I8 on the front edge portions It'and I! of the apron portions of the saddle. This tape as It is made up is somewhat stiff and hence the forward 63 for a short distance.

sufficiently wide so that any pressure or pull adjacent the inner joint or the turkey wing distributes the pressure or pull and thus materially reduces the danger of forming wing sores. Also the edge formed by the binding l8 which fits back of the inner wing joint also reduces'the danger of forming sores or the like. It will be noted that by this construction of saddle the wings fitting through the wing openings or loops 25 and the wings extending rearwardly on the outside of the apron part are the only means for keeping 'the saddle properly on the fowl. However as these saddles are made in different sizes they give a neat fit throughout a considerable range of weight of the fowl. Another characteristic of this invention is that the forward edge iii of the back panel being a selvage edge is somewhat soft and as this passes over the back of the neck of the turkey, it does not have any pulling action which might cause a sore. This forward edge'l3 is also spaced rearwardly from the front portion of the wing loops when the device is in use so that the fowl may stretchits neck upwardlywithout-causing a binding action along the selvage edge I3. I

In the construction illustrated in Fig. 5 the saddle has somewhat the characteristics ofthat of Fig. 2, there being a central panel 69 and side aprons 6! having the built up tape 62 stitched on the fabric and extending parallel to the center line of the back. This tape is made up in the same manner as illustrated in Fig. 4 and positioned on the saddle the same way. In this construction the front edge 62' of the back part preferably has a tape binding 63. of the apron sections indicated at 64 are cut back on a concave curve from the corner 65 at the front of the back panel and the lower edge 66 of 40 the apron and the rear edge 61 of the back panel are formed in a sweeping curve except that the rear edge 61 is preferably transverse to the back panel.

I form two side wing openings 10 and a cen- 45 trally positioned neck opening 1| by intersecting tapes. These are preferably binding tapes which are left fiat at the intersections. forms a binding 12 extending around the convex edge of the apron section across 50 of the center panel and has stitching 13 extending slightly forward of the outer corner I4 at the bottom of the aprons and the forward edge 64. At the termination of the stitching 13 the tape is fiat at its full width forming a soft tape sec- 55 tion 15 which extends in what may be considered as a concave curve 16 and forms a binding 11 extending from the ends of the binding 63 around the edge 64 at the forward part of the apron 6|. The stitching 18 extends forwardly of the tape may have a slight forward extension 19 worked into the stitching 13. It will be noted therefore that these two soft tapes intersect at the overlap 90. i

When this s' ddle is placed on'a fowl the neck extends through the opening II forward of the binding 63 and then overlap or cross part 991s below the neck and well forward on the breast part of the turkey. The binding 11 is underneath 70 the wings and the tape 15 follows the front portion of the inner wing joint. As the wings extend rearwardly along the side apron iii, the saddle is maintained in place and has no construction for binding either on the neck .or around the wings 7 which might cause wing sores.

The front edge Thus the tape the rear end 91- The tape portion TI In the construction of Fig. 6 the saddle is made canvas or the like and has a center or back panel 9| with side aprons 92. At the forward portion there is an underlayer of canvas 93 secured to the upper stripv by transverse stitching 94. The forward portion of the back panel indicated at 95 has a concave curve and is thus set back from the forward portion 96; that is, forward of the wing openings 91. This recessed portion 95 is to provide a comfortable fit at the back of the neck.

' A binding 98 extends completely around the saddle, that is, across the part 95, around the lower edge of the apron sections 92 on the rear end of the back panel 9 I. There are also two stiff and somewhat heavy tapes 99 made in -the same manner as illustrated in Fig. 4 extending longitudinally on each side of the back panel from the wing openings.

The construction of the wing openings 91 is illustrated particularly in Fig. 7 in which the circular line of cut of the fabricis indicated at I00,

this being through the two thicknesses, that is,

the upper canvas 99 and the lower transverse strip 93. A circularstitch IOI extends around the opening concentric thereto and spaced from'the tape 98. This construction of the wing opening forms a soft edge for encircling the inner wing joint between the circular icut edge I00 and the stitch IM. This part without any binding frays andleaves a number of loose thread ends which form a soft and pliable encircling margin for the wings. In this construction the wings extending through the openings 91 hold the saddle in place, the wings extending along theapron 92. This construction brings the longitudinal tapes 99 in substantially the same-relation to the aprons as in the constructions of Figs. 2 and 5 having the similar tapes and'substantially the longitudinal line joining the back panel and the aprons. Various changes may be made inthe details of the construction withoutdeparting from the. spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. 1

' Iclaim: I

1. A saddle for.poultry formed of a flexible fabric and having a central back panel and depending side aprons when the saddle is in position on a fowl, the lower edge of the aprons hav ing a convex curve, the forward edge of the side aprons having substantially a concave curve, a pair of parallel tapes secured to the top of the saddle and positioned substantially equi-distant from the center line of a back panel, said tapes being adapted to form two parallel ridges 'between the back panel and the apron portions, therebeing secondary tapes extending forwardly from the tapes on each side of the back' panel, said secondary tapes extending to and being secured at the lower edge of the side aprons at the front portion thereof, said secondary tapes with the concave curved edge of the side aprons forming wing openings whereby when-the -saddle is in position on a fowl the wings extend outside and longitudinally of the side aprons.

2. A saddle-for poultry as claimed in claim 1,

said secondary tapes formed as a continuation turn and having the to the lower edge of the apron and forming a binding along such lower apron edge. v

3. A saddle for poultry formed of a flexible fabric and having a central back panel and depending side aprons when the saddle is in position on a fowl, the lower edge of the aprons having a convex curvefthe forward edge of the side aprons being set rearwardly from the forward edge of the back panel and having substantially a concave curve, tapes binding the forward edge of the aprons, the bottom edge of the aprons and a the back edge of the back panel, and a pair of tapes extending forwardly from the forward portion of the back panel'at the connection with the taped front edges of the aprons, each tape leading to and being connected at the corner formed by the front edge and the lower edge of the apron.

4. A saddlefor poultry as claimed in claim 3, a pair of parallel tapes characterized by being formed of a strip of fabric having a reverse fold at one edge and having two inturned edge portions forming the other edge, the tape being stitched to the top of the fabric at substantially the junction line of the back panel and side aprons, the inturned portions of the tape facing towards the longitudinal center of the back panel and being adapted to spread apart to form a first ridge between the back panel fabric and the first inturned edge and a second ridge between said first inturned edge and the outer inturned edge.

5. A saddle for poultry comprisinga flexible I "fabric having a back panel and two side apron sections adapted to hang downwardly when in position on a fowl, the lower edge of the aprons having a convex curve merging with the transverse rear end of. the back panel, the forward edge of the aprons being positioned rearwardly from the forward edge of the back panel and having substantially a concave curve, anda relatively stiff tape extending longitudinally on each side of the back panel and being stitched to the fabric of the saddle, such tape at its forward end conforming to the shape of the front edge of the apron adjacent the front portion of the back panel, the said tape continuing in an inward turn and being attached adjacent the front portion of the back panel, the said tape continuing in a reverse turn and being attached adjacent the lower edge of the aprons on each side, the forward edge of the aprons and the forwardly extending tape providing wing openings.

6. A saddle for poultry as claimed in claim 5, the tape extending longitudinally of the back panel having a lower single edge and a plurality of upper edges stitched to flex outwardly to form a pair of parallel ridges on each side of the center line of a back panel.

7. A saddle for poultry formed of flexible fabric having a back panel central portion and two side apron portions, there being two longitudinal tapes stitched to the fabric on each side of the back panel and adapted to form a ridge along each side of the said back panel, the forward edge of the aprons extending rearwardly in a concave curve from the forward transverse edge of the back panel, the aprons having a lower convex curve, a binding on the forward edge of the aprons intersecting the tape on each side of the back panel, a binding on the lower edge of the aprons and across the rear edge of the back panel, two attaching tapes, each extending from the binding at the forward edge of the apron adjacent the forward edge of the back panel and leading to the binding on the lower edge of the opposite apron whereby the two attaching tapes intersect and form two wing openings and an opening forward of the back panel for the neck of the fowl.

8. A saddle for poultry formed of flexible fabric having a back central panel and two side apron portions adapted to hang downwardly when in a position on a fowl, the lower edge of the aprons and the rear end of the back panel having a convex curve, the forward end of the back panel being transverse and having a selvage edge, the forward edge of each side apron being set back from the forward edge of the pack panel and having substantially a concave curve with a substantially straight section at the junction with the lower edge of the aprons, a pair of relatively stlfi' tapes positioned parallel and equidistant from the longitudinal center line of the back panel and stitched at substantially the turn joining the back panel and the apron sections when in position on a fowl, the tape with the back panel forming a ridge on each side facing towards the back panel, the said tapes having a continuation converging together at the forward end of the back panel and having a reverse turn with a twist, the tapes continuing on the lower edge and the rear end of the back panel and forming a stitched binding.

9. A saddle for poultry formed of flexible fabric having a back panel and a. pain of side aprons adapted to hang downwardly when in position on a fowl, the front portion of the back panel and the aprons having a second strip of fabric stitched to the first strip and having a pair of circular openings spaced apart to form wing openings with stitches concentric to the center of each opening, the stitches being spaced from the opening, the front edge of the back panel having a concave curve extending well back between the said openings and joining with the front edge of the apron with a convex curve substantially concentric to each opening, the lower edges of the apron and rear edge of the back panel having a convex curve,

10. A saddle for poultry as claimed in claim 9. and a pair of. tapes positioned parallel and equidistant from the longitudinal center line of the back panel, stitched to the top of the first fabric and forming longitudinal ridges facing towards the back panel, the said tapes intersecting the said openings for the wings.

11. In a saddle for poultry formed of flexible fabric and having a back panel and side aprons adapted to hang downwardly when in position on a fowl, means to secure the saddle to a fowl, the saddle having a pair of parallel tapes positioned equi-distant from the longitudinal center of the back panel, each tape being formed of a strip of fabric having a reverse fold facing towards an 'apron and having the opposite edge with two in- WILLIAM HENRY KENNEDY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2751885 *Nov 5, 1954Jun 26, 1956Brown Co D SMolded turkey saddle
US7882808 *Jan 20, 2009Feb 8, 2011Crazy K Poultry + Livestock, LLCProtective hen apron
US8413614Nov 24, 2010Apr 9, 2013Tobi KosankeProtective hen apron
Classifications
U.S. Classification119/853, D30/145
International ClassificationA01K45/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01K45/00
European ClassificationA01K45/00