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Publication numberUS2091247 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1937
Filing dateJun 26, 1934
Priority dateJun 26, 1934
Publication numberUS 2091247 A, US 2091247A, US-A-2091247, US2091247 A, US2091247A
InventorsWilliams Jr John M
Original AssigneeHarold D Gregory
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Outboard motor
US 2091247 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug.l 24, 1937. J. M. WILLIAMS, JR

OUTBOARD MOTOR Filed June 26, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 ZZZ ` Aug. 24, 1937. J. M. WILLIAMS, JR

OUTBOARD MOTOR Filed June 2e, 1954 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 24, 1.937. J. M. WILLIAMS, JR

OUTBOARD MOTOR Filed June 26, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Zo 1oz Aug. 24, 1937. J. M. WILLIAMS. JR 2,091,247

OUTBOARD MOTOR Filed June 26, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Aug- 24, 1937. J. M. WILLIAMS, JR 2,091,247

OUTBOARD MOTOR Filed June 26A, 1934 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Z w mw Patented Aung. 24, 1937 UNITED STATES OUTBOARD MOTOR John M. Williams, Jr., Woodbury, N. J., assignor of one-half to Harold D. Gregory, Hadden Heights, N. J.

Application June 26, 1934, Serial No. 732,418

7 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in outboard motors.

The many various outboard motors constructed heretofore have comprised a single unit hung over the stern of the boat, and which includes a vertically-disposed propeller shaft. These motors are exposed to the elements, and for this reason are sometimes unreliable in wet weather. Some attempts have been made to muiiie the 10 noise of the engines in this type of outboard motor, but even with this improvement, they are very noisy in operation, and, furthermore, the muilling action generally means an appreciable loss of speed. Also, the vibration of these motors is relatively great, the control at all ltimes is awkward, and, generally, they cause unnecessary discomfort to the entire crew. The fact that, in these outboard motors of the prior art, the engine is a permanent part of the unit, increases y the difllculty of removal from the stern of the boat for repairs or to prevent theft. In this connection, the units, due to their being so cumbersome 'and heavy, are sometimes lost overboard in attempting to remove them from orplace the same in position over the stern of the boat.

In the prior outboard motors vof the general type referred to, furthermore, the engines are not in the logical position for immediate attention when necessary, and there is lack of control at high speed.

For the purpose of holding these prior outboard motors in position, a supporting bracket is clamped or otherwise secured to thestern of the boat, and the motor unit is hung from this by a pivotal connection. The entire unit, therefore, can swing sternward upon striking an underwater obstruction, or upon striking bottom in riding up on the beach. v 40 With the foregoing disadvantages of the prior outboard motors in mind, it has been proposed to make a construction wherein there aretwo units, namely, an engine unit which is built permanently into and enclosed in the stern of the boat, below the deck, and an outboard propeller unit pivotally connected to the stern and driven `from the engine through a breakable driving connection which is-broken when the propeller unit swings sternward. While this proposed con- 60 struction avoids some of the disadvantages referred to, it is a rather radical departure from the conventional outboard motor, and approaches more nearly the usual construction of a. motor boat with a built-in engine disposed with its 55 crankshaft substantially parallel to the keel.

With all the foregoing in mind, it is one of the objects of my invention to provide an improved construction of outboard motor which avoids the various disadvantages referred to. while still retaining the general classification of an outboard motor, rather than departing for this purpose' into the classification of the usual motor boat with the permanently built-in engine. Y y

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear. l

In accordance with my inventicn, the outboard motor, so-called, is constructed in two units, both supported by a common bracket which is attached to the stern of .the boat. The engine unit is mounted on the bracket, and can be easily removed therefrom without disturbing the other parts. 'I'he propeller shaft is hung from the bracket by a pivotal connection, and can there- ,fore swing sternward when required, a breakable driving connection between the engine and the propeller shaft permitting this at any time. A muiller chamber is incorporated in the supporting bracket through which connections are made between this chamber and the engine exhaust pipes. Connections for the circulation of cooling water through the cylinder jackets are also made through the bracket. A casing associated with the supporting bracket completely encloses and protects the engine.

My invention resides in the improved construction `of the character hereinafter described and claimed.

For the purpose of illustrating my invention.. several embodiments thereof are shown in the drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view, the seetion being taken 'on the line i-I in Fig. 3;

Fig. 2 is a. fragmentary, sectional view, taken from Fig. 1, the section being taken on the line 2--2 in F18. 3;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view, looking toward the left in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 1, partly in section and partly broken away, the propeller unit being shown swung sternward;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, elevational view. taken from Fig. 3, partly in section and partly broken away, the section being taken on the line 5-5 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 4, illustrative of a modified driving connection between the engine and propeller units; Fig. 10 is a sectional view. the section being taken on the line |0-I0 in Fig. 9; and

Fig. 11 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view, taken fromFig. 1.

With reference now to Figs. 1 to 6, the numeral I0 designates the engine unit, shown l0 mounted on a base plate I2 which ts upon a platform I4 forming part of a supporting bracket construction I6. 'I'he plate I2 is secured to the bracket I6, and the latter is secured in place on the stern of the boat by stud bolts I8.

15 'I'he propeller unit is designated generally by the reference numeral 22, and includes an outer, vertically-disposed casing 24 provided with spaced lugs 26 through winch a bushing 28 extends, as more clearly shown in Fig. 5. Stud 20 screws 30 and 3| pass through the lugs 26 and screw into the bushing 28.

For the purpose of pivotally connecting the propeller unit to the supporting bracket I6, the bushing 28 is journaled at its ends in spaced lugs 25 32 and 33 extending downwardly from the bracket platform I4, and between which the lugs 26 are disposed with a relatively loose t.

The propeller-drive shaft 34 is rotatable in a cylindrical column 36 forming part of a mem- 30 ber 38 which carries the propeller 40. The co1- umn 36 is rotatable in the casing 24, and is provided at its upper end with a worm wheel 42 which meshes with a complementary worm 44.

The worm 44 is xed on a shaft 46 journaled 35 in the bushing 28, as more clearly shown in Fig. 5, and also in a tubular bearing element 48. The element 48 has an enlarged head 50 at one end thereof which has a snug fit in the bushing 28,

and which is fixed to the bushing by the stud 40 screw 3|. A lever 52 is ilxed to the other end of the tubular element 48 for the purpose hereinafter explained.

Cooling water is supplied to the jackets of the engine cylinders 54 and 56 by the action of the 45 propeller 40, which forces water up through a passage 58 in the member 38 and the column 36.

The passage 58 communicates with an annular groove 60 in the column 36, from which the water passes, by way of a connection 62, to an annular 50 passage 64 in the bushing 28. An opening 66 through the bracket platform I4 provides communication between the passage 64 and a T- coupling 68 screwed into the base plate I2 and from which connections and 12 lead to the 55 cylinders 54 and 56, respectively. A compressible gasket 13 provides a water seal between the base plate I2 and the platform I4.

'Ihe exhaust gases leave the engine cylinders by way of exhaust pipes 14 and 16 which fit and 60 connect respectively with complementary pipes 18 and 80 opening into a U-shape muffler chamber 82 formed in the supporting bracket I6. With the propeller unit 22 in the vertical operating position shown in Fig. 1, the muiiler charn- 65 ber 82 connects through openings 84 in the bracket I6 with a U-shape passage 86 in the casing 24, vby way of which the exhaust gases pass into an outlet passage 88, as indicated by the arrows shown.

70 Cooling water leaves the jacket of cylinder 56 by a, connection 90 which extends into the exhaust pipe 16. By terminating the end of the connection 90 at a Venturi neck 92 with which the pipe 16 is provided as shown in Fig. 2, an

75 ejector action is provided for, whereby the flow of the exhaust gases through the Venturi neck is eiective to draw the cooling water from the connection 90. This action works with that of the propeller 40, as explained, in maintaining the flow of cooling water.

A connection `94 operates in the same manner as the connection 90 to conduct cooling water from the jacket of cylinder 54 into the associated exhaust pipe 14, which is also provided with a Venturi neck.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the cooling water nds an outlet through the pipes 18 and 80, the muiiler chamber 82, and passages 86 and 88.

Driving connection between the engine and the propeller shaft 94 is made by complementary ratchet wheels or gears 96 and 98. The gear 96 is ilxed on the lower end of a vertical shaft 99 driven directly by the engine pistons, as will be well understood. The gear 98 is fixed on the upper end of the propeller shaft. 'I'he two gears, when engaged as shown in Fig. 1, are disposed within the recessed worm gear 42, with the engaging teeth in a horizontal plane through the axis of the pivotal connection between the propeller unit and the engine unit. The pivotal connection, therefore, is disposed on the stern side of the breakable driving connection between the engine and propeller units, and substantially at the same level as this connection.

If an underwater obstruction is encountered, or the boat is run up on the beach, the propeller unit 22 swings sternward as shown in Fig. 4, and the gears 96 and 98 are disengaged. Simultaneously with this action, a rod |00, slidably mounted on the bracket I6, is moved upwardly and to the left as viewed in Fig. 4 to open a switch |02 connected in the ignition circuit of the engine. For this purpose, the bushing 28 is provided with a notch |04 into which the lower end of the rod |00 fits as shown in Fig. 1l when the gears 96 and 98 are engaged. As the propeller unit swings sternward the cam action of the inclined side of the notch |04 forces the rod |00 outward against the action of a compressed spring |06, whereupon a collar I I4 fixed on the rod engages the switch |02 to open it. Ratchet teeth H0 with which the bushing 28 is also provided then engage with the lower end of the rod, as shown in Fig. 4, to prevent return movement of the propeller unit until an outward pull is exerted on the handle II2 at the other end of the rod. When the propeller unit has moved back into the vertical position and the driving gears 96 and 98 are properly engaged, the lower end of the rod |00 is again free to enter the notch |04 under the action of the spring |06, in which case the shank of the handle ||2 engages the ignition switch |02 to close it.

It will, therefore, be seen that my improved construction provides for automatic opening of the ignition circuit or other control means to shut down the engine simultaneously with the breaking of the driving connection 96, 98, and that the ignition is automatically turned on only when the propeller unit is again in operating position and the driving connection re-established. Racing of ,the engine when the load thereon is suddenly removed is thereby prevented.

By grasping the lever 52 and swinging it in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 1, the operator can swing the propeller unit sternward and bring about the same action Just explained.

Pivotal movement of the propeller unit does not break or interfere with the inlet connection for cooling water to the cylinder Jackets because the opening Il always makes communication 5 with the annular passage or groove in the t rotatable bushing 2l. Il'iis is the advantage of supplying cooling water to the engine by way of the pivotal connection between the engine and propeller units. 1o Steering is accomplished by rotating the shaft 46, whereupon the worm gearing 42, 44 causes rotation of the member 38 about the vertical axis. For this purpose it is proposed to ilx a pulley IIB on the shaft 43, about which is a rope ||8 associated with the usual steering gear (not shown). It will be seen that the shaft 43 can be rotated to turn the propeller through 360 degrees ineither direction. The boat can. therefore, heA easily and quickly maneuvered. When 2o the propeller is rotated through 189 degrees from the position shown in Fig. 1, engagement of the lower end of rod |90 in the notch |04 is sufficient tc hold the propeller unit in the vertical position against s. moderate sternward thrust. The spring i 06, to provide for this, is placed under the proper tension by a collar |||8 ilxed on the rod |00.

A casing |20 completely enclosesthe engine, and is provided with the recess shown in Fig. 4 to accommodate the rod |00 and associated parts.

The casing I2@ is provided with partitions |23 and |24 to form fuel chambers |23 forward of the engine and on both sides of the carburetor |26 and the intake manifold |21. The fuel is placed into the chambers |25 by way of a connection |28 closed by a. removable cap |30.

A cover |32 for the casing is pivotally connected thereto at |34, and is shaped to t about the engine flywheel |35 when closed. By swinging the cover |32 upward to the open position shown in Fig. 1 by dash lines, access to the engine may be had. The cover of the engine casing slopes downwardly in the sternward direction, as shown at |36, to give a. streamline effect. In this Way, also, the pivotal connection |34 is caused to be'substantially below the forward upper edge of the casing |20, so that when the cover is swung upward more room is allowed for inspection of and repair to the engine than would otherwise be the case.

The casing |20 and its cover |32, and the fuel chambers |25 disposed directly forward of the engine cylinders, mullle the engine noises.

In the modification shown in Fig. 7, the engine is disposed Within the hull of the boat, below the stern deck, and is mounted on a base plate |2a secured to the supporting bracket |6a. 'I'he short shaft 99a corresponds to the shaft l! in Fig. 1, and is driven by the engine through the gears |38, |40, and |42 mounted as shown on the a0 plate |2a and forming part of the engine unit.

A casing |20a. encloses the engine and is provided with a cover |32a. Fuel is supplied to the carburetor by a connection |44 from a fuel tank which may be located in the bow. The construcciti tion and manner of operation is otherwise the same as in Figs. 1 and 6.

In Fig. 8 the engine is disposed within the boat, as in Fig. 7, but is mounted on the upper side of the supporting platform |4b which corre- 10 sponds to the platform |4 in Fig. 1. Connection between the engine and the-propeller shaft is made through/a suitable clutch |46 and gears |48, |50, and |52 associatedwith and forming part of the propeller unit. In removing the 7d engine unit, the base plate |2b is released from the platform |411, and the unit lifted out. To permit this, the lower end |84 of the engine shaft is made square, and `fits into a square hold in the clutch shaft. The construction and manner of operation is otherwise the same as in Figs. 1 to 8.

In the modincation shown in Figs. 9 and 10, connection between the engine, and propeller shafts is made through a double universal joint |34. In removing the engine unit, complementary ratchet wheels |38 disengage. The cylindrical column 33o, which'corresponds to the column 3G in Fig. 1, is provided with a bevel gear 42e which meshes with a bevel gear 44o fixed on the end of the shaft 40o. Steering is accomplished by rotating the shaft 43o. The complementary ends |30 and |32 of the universal joint are square and slidable one within the other to permit pivotal movement of the propeller unit, as shown in Fig. 9, without breaking the driving connection between the engine and the propeller. The construction and manner of operation are otherwise the same as in Figs. l to 6.

It will be understood that various other modiilcations, within the conception of those skilled in the art, are possible without departing from the spirit of my invention or the scope of the claims.

AI claim as my invention:

1. In an outboard motor having a vertical shaft structure, a motor unit including an internal combustion engine mounted on the upper end of the shaft structure and a lower unit including a propeller; a bearing device embracing said vertical shaft structure and supporting the same for pivotal movement therein for steering the boat to which said outboard motor is adapted to be connected, a transom bracket structure secured to said bearing device, said transom bracket structure being formed to provide an exhaust chamber therein and having a substantially vertical wall, means including said wail for clamping said bracket structure to the boat, and an exhaust connection from said engine to said chamber whereby said chamber serves as an exhaust muiller.

2. In an outboard motor having a vertical shaft structure, a motor unit including an internal combustion engine mounted at one end of the shaft structure and a lower unit including a propeller at the other end of the shaft structure; a bearing device embracing said vertical shaft structure and supporting the same for pivotal movement therein for steering the b oat to which said outboard motor is adapted to be connected, a transom bracket structure associated with said bearing device, said transom bracket structure being formed to provide an exhaust chamber therein and having a wall.

means including said wall for clamping said bracket structure to the boat, and an exhaust connection from said engine to said chamber whereby said chamber serves as an exhaust muiiier.

3. In an .outboard motor, a bracke adapted to be applied to the stern board of a boat and provided with a bearing disposed to be in a position aft of such board when the bracket is applied thereto, an engine unit attached to said bracket for support thereby independently of direct support by the boat structure, a vertically disposed propeller unit pivotally connected to said bearing for support by said bracket independently of direct support by the boat structure and independently of support by said engine unit, said engine unit being supported by said bracket independently of said propeller unit and xed against relative movement with respect to said bracket, and means providing a driving connection between said units.

5 4. In an outboard motor, a bracket adapted to be applied to the stern board of a boat and provided with a bearing disposed to be in a position aft of such board when the bracket is applied thereto, an engine unit attached to said bracket for support thereby independently of direct support by the boat structure, a vertically disposed propeller unit pivotally connected to said bearing for support by said bracket independently of direct support by the boat structure and independently of support by said engine unit, said engine unit being supported by said bracket independently of said propeller unit and fixed against relative movement with respect to said bracket, means providing a driving connection between said units, said propeller unit comprising a member rotatable about the vertical axis through three hundred and sixty degrees. in either direction and a propeller rotatable with said member about said axis, and means for rotating said member about said axis.

5. In an outboard motor, a bracket adapted to be applied to the stern board of a boat and provided with a bearing disposed to be in a position aft of such board when the bracket is applied thereto, an engine unit attached to said bracket for support thereby independently of direct support by the boat structure, a vertically disposed propeller unit pivotally connected to said bearing for support by said bracket independently of direct support by the boat structure and independently of support by said engine unit, said engine unit being supported by said bracket independently of said propeller unit and xed against relative movement with respect to said bracket, and means providing a driving connection between said units, said propeller unit being provided with an exhaust-gas outlet passage having communication with said engine unit and disposed below the water-line'of said outboard motor.

6. In an outboard motor, a bracket adapted to be applied to the stern board of a boat and provided with a bearing disposed to be in a position ait o! such board when the bracket is applied thereto, an engine unit attached to said bracket for support thereby independently of direct support by the boat structure, a vertically disposed propeller unit pivotally connected to said bearing for support by said bracket independently of direct support by the boat structure and independently of support by said engine unit, said engine unit being supported by said bracket independently of said propeller unit and fixed against relative movement with respect to said bracket, means providing a driving connection between said units, said propeller unit comprising a member rotatable about the vertical axis through three hundred and sixty degrees in either direction and a propeller rotatable with said member about said axis, said propeller unit being provided with an exhaust-gas outlet passage having communication with said engine unit and disposed below the water-line of said outboard motor, and means for rotating said member about said axis.

7. In an outboard motor, abracket adapted to be applied to the stern board of a boat and provided with a bearing disposed to be in a position aft of such board when the bracket is applied thereto, an engine unit attached to said bracket for support thereby independently of direct support by the boat structure, a vertically disposed propeller unit pivotally connected to said bearing for support by said bracket independently of direct support by the boat structure and independently of support by said engine unit, said engine unit' being supported by said bracket independently of said propeller unit and fixed against relative movement with respect to said bracket, and means providing a driving connection between said units, said outboard motor being provided with a passage for cooling water for said engine unit and passing through said bearing whereby the connection with said engine unit for the cooling water is maintained during occurring pivotal movement of said propeller unit about said bearing.

JOHN M. WILLIAMS, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458813 *Feb 13, 1943Jan 11, 1949Murray & Tregurtha IncOutboard propeller mechanism for barges, scows, and the like
US2536894 *Dec 23, 1948Jan 2, 1951Murray & Tregurtha IncOutboard propeller mechanism for boats, barges, and the like
US2571245 *Sep 13, 1947Oct 16, 1951Holmes Le Roy SOutboard motor
US2676559 *Dec 11, 1951Apr 27, 1954Victor N DaviesOutboard motor for watercraft
US2946306 *Jan 20, 1958Jul 26, 1960Edward LeipertTiltable and steerable marine propeller unit
US2957441 *Oct 31, 1957Oct 25, 1960Edward LeipertMotor boat drive mechanism
US3175530 *Jan 24, 1962Mar 30, 1965Knut Goran KnutssonPropelling system for boats
US3181495 *Jan 7, 1963May 4, 1965Kiekhaefer CorpCoolant supply and exhaust discharge means for inboard-outboard drives
US3183880 *Jul 10, 1963May 18, 1965Outboard Marine CorpMarine propulsion device
US3310021 *Apr 27, 1965Mar 21, 1967Outboard Marine CorpEngine
US4615683 *Aug 23, 1984Oct 7, 1986Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaOutboard motor
US4726799 *Feb 10, 1986Feb 23, 1988Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaOutboard motor
US5190488 *Feb 25, 1991Mar 2, 1993Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaOutboard motor
US5487687 *Jul 18, 1994Jan 30, 1996Brunswick CorporationMidsection and cowl assembly for an outboard marine drive
US7662005 *Jul 16, 2007Feb 16, 2010Brian ProvostOutboard motor with reverse shift
Classifications
U.S. Classification440/53, 440/89.00R, 440/88.00J, 440/89.00C, 440/89.00B, 440/89.00J
International ClassificationB63H20/00, B63H20/02, B63H20/22
Cooperative ClassificationB63H20/22, B63H20/02
European ClassificationB63H20/02, B63H20/22