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Publication numberUS2093586 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1937
Filing dateOct 21, 1936
Priority dateOct 21, 1936
Publication numberUS 2093586 A, US 2093586A, US-A-2093586, US2093586 A, US2093586A
InventorsDay William P
Original AssigneeInternat Vibration Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for vibrating concrete
US 2093586 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Spt. 21, 1937. w. P. DAY

A APIAARATUS FOR VIBRATING CONCRETE Filed oci. 21, 1956 3 vSheets-Sheet 1 .of a R. m 3 m MU w a .(3 E O w o o y, wmf. m f .J w, f, f Q W @d f M Wx f.

Sept. 21, 1937. W. P. DAY

APPARATUS FOR VITBRATING CONCRETE Filed Oct. 21, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 w 7 4 u 4 a J @C 4 W yf# M Q a?. w 2 J 6m WHT lem/.f m wr l J J 7. J /f -Il nl A d A f U J :z v

ATTORNEY.

Sept.`21,` 1937. f w.` P. DAY

I APPARATUS FOR VIBRATING CONCRETE Filedwoct. 21, 195e s sheets-sheet` s ATTORNEY..

Patented Sept.`21, 1937 Unire' STATES ATENT orFICE APPARATUS FOR VIBRATING CONCRI'E William P. Day, cleveland Heights, omdassign- `or to The International Vibration Company,

Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application October 21, 1936, Serial No. 196,771

12 Claims.

`:called a spud'vibrator which consists of a motor with an off-center weight mounted in a casing which is submerged the concrete and connected `with the power means by a flexible shaft. "I'hese Spud vibrators arefdiiiicult to insert or remove fand also do not impart sufcient vibration to the concrete to accomplish "the result desired. Attempts have also beenrnade toimpartvibrations `to concrete by means of different types of power- `operatedvibrators `attached to the forms; but `'suchffarmethod has, also been found to be ineffectiveand unsatisfactory. Tampers have also l beenused tocause the concrete to settle but these too have'not been satisfactory for the reason that lsuicientvibrations are not imparted tothe con-` crete or to the reinforcingA rods or mesh.

\ -The main object of this. invention is to provide a' method of vibrating concrete and an apparatus which will practice the method and by means of which rapid and violent vibrations are transmittedthroughout the concrete and to the reinforcing rods to cause the concrete to settle toaf substantial degree whereby to reduce the moisture content of the concrete and to substantially eliminate voids in the concrete which makes itpossible and practicalv to use` a stif or harsh ix Awhich contains a much smaller percentage of `\moisture. .l i Another object of the inventionl is to provide an `apparatus and tool for practicing the method `herein described which can be readily inserted into `or removed from the concrete and which comprises.comparatively lfew parts and which can be producedat minimum cost."

` A further object'of the invention is to provide `a `method ofvibrating concrete which consists inimmersing in the soft concrete a tool having a rigid portion and one or more flexible portions and thenjrapidly "and violently reciprocating the `tool `in a plane. perpendicular to the horizontal `surface of the concrete. A

Further and more limited objects of the inventionwill appear as the description proceeds and byreferencejto the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a `view partly in section and. partly in elevation showing my improved apparatus With the vibrating tool immersed in a concrete wall; Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation at right angles to Fig. 1 and showing the upper part of the vibrating apparatus; Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the vibratingr apparatus; Fig. 4 is a horizontal view of the vibrating tool; Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional'view taken on the line 5--5 of Fig.-1;

VFig. 6 is a vertical sectional View taken on the line 6 6 of Fig. 5; Fig. 7 is a view in elevation of the eccentric link removed from the apparatus; Fig. 8 is ahorizontal sectional View taken on the `line 8 8 of Fig. 5; Fig. 9 is a detail sectional `View showing the manner of securing the shaft of the vibratingv tool to the apparatus; "Fig, 10 is a vertical'sectio'nal viewof a modified form of vibrating tool; Fig. 11 is a'view in side elevation of the tool shownin Fig.` 10; Fig. 12 is a vertical sectional" view showing another modied form of vtool; and Fig. 13 Ais a horizontal sectional view ltaken on the line vl3`fl3 of Fig. 12.

Referring now to the drawings the apparatus consists essentially of a casing l which is shaped as shown most clearly in Figs. 1 to 6 inclusive. f

Formed integralwith the casing l are a pair of bosses 2 and 3 having aligned openingstherein andin `which are positionedbearings, 4 and 5. Extending through the bosses 2 and 3 is a hollow shaftjor pipe 6 the central portion of which is threaded as shown at 1. The ends of the pipe project through aligned openings provided in the Opposite ends of the casing, as shown most clear- `ly in Fig. 5, and are provided with threaded portions 8. and 9` and in which are provided slots In and il.` Oneside of the casing is provided With a ,rectangular` opening which is normally closed by a cover plate l2 which is secured in place by means of bolts I3. J ournaled in the casing is a shaft I4 which is mounted in suitable bearings l5 and I6. Thevshaft is provided with an enlarged portion` 1|1 and an eccentric i8 the purpose 'of which will hereinafter appear. The shaft is held in place b'ya pair of cover plates I 9 and 2U and one end of the shaft projects outwardly therefrom, as shown 'atv 2l in Fig. 7. The end `of the shaft 2| is adapted to be connected with suitable power operated means. Fitting over the pipe 6 and threadedly secured thereto is a member 22 which is held with respect to the pipe by means of a pair of nuts 23"and 24. The member 22 is shaped asfshownv most clearly in Figs. 5 to 7v inclusive, and' has a pair of arms 25 and 26 which are spaced apart and through which extends a pin 21 which is held in place by a head portion 28 and a nut 29. is a bearing 30.

In order to form a driving connection between the shaft I4 and the member 22 and to convert the rotary motion of the shaft I4 into a reciprocatory motion of the member 22, I have provided an eccentric link 3| which has a circular opening 32 therein and which receives therein the bearing 35. The link 3| also has a circular opening 53 therein and in which is positioned a bearing 34 which is held in place by a pair of arcuate plates 35 and 36 which are secured to the link by means of bolts 31. It will be seen that a rotary motion of the shaft |4 and eccentric I8 will impart a reciprocatory motion to the link 3| which pivots upon the pin 2l and imparts a reciprocatory motion to the member 22 which in turn is rigidly connected with the pipe 6. Extending through the pipe 6 is a reach rod or shaft 33 which is made up of a plurality of sections. Threadedly secured on the opposite ends of the pipe 6 are a pair of locking nuts 39 and 4|) which may be tightened to rigidly secure the pipe 6 to the shaft 38 at a plurality of spaced points. 'I'he slots IU and in the ends of the pipe facilitate this clamping action. Each section of the shaft 38 may have adjacent the upper end thereof a circumferential groove 4| and the adjacent ends of the pipe 6 are provided with an inwardly extending circumferential enlargement 42 which is adapted to engage in the groove 4| when the locking nuts are tightened, as shown most clearly in Fig. 9. Closing the casing and surrounding the shaft 38 are a pair of circular plates 43 and 44 which are secured in place by bolts 45 and 46. The casing I is adapted to be filled with lubricant and in order to prevent leakage of lubricant along the pipe 6 a pair of packing washers 4l and 48 are provided. The projecting end 2| of the shaft I4 is provided with a keyway 49 to facilitate its connection with a suitable source of power. Each section of the reach rod 38 is provided at the end thereof with a recessed threaded portion 50 which is adapted to receive therein a reduced threaded extension on the next adjacent section. Carried by the lower end of the reach rod is the vibrating tool which consists essentially of a shaft 52 to the lower end of which is secured a pointed head member 53. Slidably mounted on the shaft 52 is a collar 54 which may be adjustably secured in place by means of a set screw 55. Secured to the collar 55 are a` plurality of flexible steel wires which are indicated by the reference character 56 the lower ends of which are secured to the head member 53. These flexible Wires 56 are preferably formed of twisted steel wire and are sufficiently flexible that when the collar 54 is moved downwardly on the shaft from the position shown in Fig. l, flexible loops will be formed. The position of the collar 54 on the shaft section 52 determines the size of these loops.

In forming the usual concrete wall, the general practice is to set up form boards in which are positioned a plurality of metal reinforcing rods. The concrete is then poured into the form boards and agitated or tamped or vibrated to cause it to settle. In Fig. 1 the tool is shown as immersed in concrete and the reinforcing rods are indicated by the reference character 51. In most cases these reinforcing rods are sufficiently close together to make it impractical to insert between the reinforcing rods a tool of suillcient size to give the necessary Vibration. In view of the fact that the wires 56 are flexible, my tool may be inserted between reinforcing rods which are quite Journaled on the pin close together. The flexibility of the Wires also permits the ready withdrawal of the tool from the concrete. In addition, the flexible wires being in contact with the rods, also tend to transmit the vibration of the tool throughout the concrete to a considerable degree. If the rods are spaced wider apart than shown in Fig. 1, the collar 54 may be adjusted to adjust the size of the flexible loops. The apparatus is of such size and weight that it can be readily handled by one operator and a pair of handles 58 and 59 are secured to the side of the casing which are grasped in the hands of the operator. These handles are secured in place by suitable bolts 60.

According to the preferred manner of practicing the method, the tool is ilrst inserted within the form boards between the reinforcing rods, as shown most clearly in Fig. l. The end of the shaft 2| is then connected with a suitable source of power such as a gas engine or an electric motor and rotated at a very high speed. The rotary motion of the shaft I4 imparts a reciprocatory motion to the pipe 6 and shaft 38 and hence to the vibrating tool. The speed of rotation of the shaft I4 is preferably such that the reciprocations imparted to the tool are between 3600 and 4000 per minute. The reciprocations imparted to the tool are very short and preferably do not exceed 1A; of an inch. It will thus be seen that rapid and violent reciprocations are imparted to the tool and that the vibratory motion of the tool is also imparted to the reinforcing rods for the reason that they are in contact with the tensioned flexible loops of the tool. Sufficient concrete is poured into the forms to cover the tool and about up to the height shown in Fig. l. If desired, the tool may then be moved to a different position and the same operation performed, or a plurality of tools may be employed. Vibrations are applied for a sufficient period of time to cause the concrete to settle to a substantial degree and to reduce the moisture content of the concrete and to substantially eliminate voids therein. In most cases, vibrations of from 30 to 60 seconds are sulcient to accomplish the result desired. When a second layer of concrete is laid, the tool is withdrawn until the head member is disposed at a point adjacent the surface of the vibrated concrete. An additional layer of concrete is then poured and the vibrations again applied in a similar manner until the complete wall has been laid. As the tool is raised, the lock nuts 39 and 40 may be loosened to permit the reach rod to pass freely through the pipe 6 so that the sections of the reach rod may be detached and removed as required. It will be seen that the vibrations are imparted to the concrete in a vertical plane, that is, a plane perpendicular to the surface of the concrete. This motion simulates a tamping action although much more effective. The fact that the vibrations are applied in a vertical direction facilitates removal of the tool from the concrete. If desired, a layer of concrete of considerable depth may rst be poured into the form and the tool inserted thereinto and the vibrations applied inthe manner described. The flexible loops on the tool permit it to be inserted into or removed from the concrete with ease even though the reinforcing rods be spaced a slight distance apart. I have found that with the method herein described, I am able to cause the concrete to settle between 20 and 25 percent and to greatly reduce the moisture content and to substantially eliminate voids. The fact that the vibrations are imparted to the reinforcing rods also causes the `to produce a stronger structurer` :.11 y.

` linings., and iitnereis discloseda .modified "lit form .of tool which consistsofaishaftgl which is preferably rectangular incrossA section and; to

thexlower end of which isconnect'ed a ,head .member 62. which is also rectangul'arin shape.

Slidab-ly mounted: on the shaftLBI isa collar 63 which is adjustablysecured in position byfmeans of a set screw 64 and rigidlyconnectedwith `the lcollar 63 is a rectangular bar 651. Connecting lthe members 62 and 65 "and disposedzonvopposite sides of the shaft 6I are alb-plurality of flexible `steel wires 66 and .61.` `It will be 4seen that by adjusting the position ofthe collar 63 onsthe i shaft 6|, thesize of the iiexible loops mayw-be increased or decreased.. This tool is operated inthe same .manner as the. tool described in connection .withFigs 1' to 8 inclusiveand` functions i inthe same manner.

In Figs. 12 and 13, there is disclosed another modified form of tool which is particularly adapted for use in applying vibrations to concrete oors. This form of tool consists of a shaft 68 which is adapted to be attached to the reach rod and to the lower end of which is rigidly secured a head piece 69 which is preferably rectangular in shape. slidably mo-unted on the shaft 68 is a collar 'Hl which has an outwardly projecting circular flange thereon and to which are secured a plurality of flexible steel wires 'll the lower portions of which normally rest upon the rectangular head member 69, as shown in Fig. 1l. By adjusting the position of the collar T0 on the shaft B8,these wires may be moved to the desired position. The collar 1U is held `in the adjusted position `by means of a set screw 12. This tool is particularly adapted for imparting vibrations to concrete oors and is operated in the same manner as the tools already described and is adapted for attachment to thereach rod 38.

It will `now be clear that I have provided a method and apparatus for imparting vibrations to concrete which will accomplish the objects of the invention hereinbefore stated. It is of course to be understood that various changes may be made in thedetails of the apparatus and tools rWithout departing from the spirit of my invention as the embodiments of the invention herein disclosed are to be considered merely as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. The invention is therefore limited only in accordance with the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid and Violent vibrations to soft concrete, comprising a shaft, a head member secured to the lower end of said shaft, a collar mounted on said shaft, a plurality of flexible members each of which has one end secured to said collar and the opposite end thereof secured to said head member and power means for imparting rapid and violent reciprocations to said shaft.

2. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid and Violent vibrations to soft concrete, comprising a shaft, a head member secured to the lower end of said shaft, a collar slidably mounted on said shaft, a plurality of flexible members each of which has one end secured to said collar and the opposite end thereof Vsecured to said head member, power means for imparting rapid and violent reciprocations to said shaft, and means for adjustably securing said collar in place.

3. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid fand violent vibrationsto' soft concrete,` comprising a shaft, a vibratory tool .secured toi the lower; end of said shaft and adapted to be immers-edm soft concrete, saidtoolf consisting of ahead member iand a shaft section,.a collar slidably mounted on Asaid shaftsection and aip'lurality of flexiblemem- `bers each of whichA has oneendconnected 'with said collar and its opposite end connected with said head member, andpoweroperated means for imparting reciprocatory motion to said tool.

` 4. A vibrating. apparatus forimparting rapid `.and violent vibrations toV concrete, comprising a shaft, a vibratory tool secured to the lower endof said shaft and adapted to be immersed insoft concreteVsaid tool including a shaft section, a

said shaft section'and:a.1pluralityfof iieikible members' each of which has one end connectedwwith "said collar andits opposite end connected with fsaid` head member,` power `operated means forimparting a reciprocatory motion to said tool, said flexible members being arranged to provide loops of different sizes when said collar is' moved to different positions on said tool.`

5. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid and violent vibrations to soft concrete comprising a shaft, a tool secured to the lower end of said shaft and adapted to be immersed in soft concrete, said tool comprising a rigid member having one or more iiexible members connected therewith and means for imparting rapid and violent reciprocations to said tool.

6. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid and violent vibrations to soft concrete comprising a shaft, a tool secured to the lower end of said shaft and adapted to beimmersed in soft concrete, said tool comprising a rigid member having one or more flexible loops held under compression and secured thereto and means for imparting rapid and violent reciprocations to said tool.

7. A vibrating apparatus for imparting rapid and violent vibrations to soft concrete comprising a shaft, a tool secured to the lower end of said shaft'and adapted to be immersed in soft concrete, said tool comprising a rigid member having one or more iiexible loops connected therewith, and means for imparting rapid and violent reciprocations to said tool, and means for varying the size ofsaid loops.

8. A vibrating apparatus of the character described comprising a casing, a shaft journaled in said casing `and having one end projecting therefrom, a tubular member slidably mounted in said casing and adapted to receive a shaft therethrough, said rst mentioned shaft having an eccentric thereon, connections between said tubular member and eccentric whereby a rotary movement of said eccentric will reciprocate said tubular member, Ymeans for rigidly securing said tubular member to said Second mentioned shaft, and a reciprocatory tool carried by the lower end of said last mentioned shaft.

9. A Vibrating apparatus of the character described comprising a casing, a shaft journaled in said casing and having one end projecting therefrom, a tubular member slidably mounted in said casing and adapted to `receive a shaft therethrough, said first mentioned shaft having an eccentric thereon, connections between said tubular member and eccentric whereby a rotary movement of said eccentric will reciprocate said tubular member, means for rigidly securing said tubular member to said second mentioned shaft, and a reciprocatory tool carried by the lower end of .115 headmember and a vcollar slidably mounted on` said last mentioned shaft and comprising a rigid member having one or more flexible members thereon.

10. A vibrating apparatus forimparting rapid and violent vibrations to soft concrete comprising a casing, a shaft journaled in said casing and adapted for rotary movement, a second shaft mounted for reciprocatory movement in said casing, means for converting a rotary movement of said first shaft into a reciprocatory motion of said second shaft, a reach rod rigidly secured to said second shaft and a vibratory tool carried by the lower end of said reach rod.

11. A vibrating apparatusI for imparting rapid and violent vibrations to soft concrete comprising a casing, a shaft journaled in said casing and adapted for rotary movement, a second shaft mounted for reciprocatory movement in said casing, means for converting a rotary movement of said rst shaft into a reciprocatory motion of said second shaft, a reach rod rigidly secured to said second shaft and a vibratory tool carried by the lowerr end of said reach rod, said Vibratory tool comprising a rigid member and one or more exible members secured thereto. 5

end of said reach rod and comprising a shaft, a ,1y

lower member carried by said shaft, an upper member carried by said shaft, a plurality of flexible Wires connecting said members, one of said members being slidably mounted on said shaft.

WILLIAM P. DAY. 2

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2651979 *Jun 2, 1948Sep 15, 1953Jackson Vibragtors IncPaving machine, including means for spading at the sides of the forms
US3082106 *May 27, 1955Mar 19, 1963Kaspar Winkler & Co DrMethods for the manufacture of mortar and concrete
US4571321 *Dec 29, 1983Feb 18, 1986Pittsburgh Corning CorporationMethod and apparatus for leveling a batch of pulverulent constituents in making a vitreous cellular material
US4759632 *Feb 25, 1986Jul 26, 1988Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for producing a slurry for underwater placement
US5988292 *Dec 29, 1997Nov 23, 1999Knotts; Jerry WayneGround tilling device
US6273601 *Jul 7, 2000Aug 14, 2001Narex Ceska Lipa, A.S.Power mixer with holding frame for resting on a surface
US7267476 *Nov 24, 2003Sep 11, 2007Conair CorporationDual handle immersion blender
US7674034 *Nov 3, 2006Mar 9, 2010Vita-Mix CorporationFood mixing machine and agitator therefor
US7740401 *Apr 16, 2007Jun 22, 2010Vita-Mix CorporationFood mixing machine and agitator therefor
US20050111296 *Nov 24, 2003May 26, 2005Conair CorporationDual handle immersion blender
US20070286014 *Jun 8, 2007Dec 13, 2007Leo International LimitedStirring rod
US20080106970 *Nov 3, 2006May 8, 2008Vita-Mix CorporationAgitator for a food mixing machine
DE3103025A1 *Jan 30, 1981Oct 14, 1982Artus FeistVerfahren zum gleichmaessigen verteilen von moertel auf oberflaechen
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/456, 366/325.7, 366/65, 366/326.1, 366/129
International ClassificationE04G21/06, E04G21/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04G21/08
European ClassificationE04G21/08