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Publication numberUS2093834 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1937
Filing dateApr 30, 1934
Priority dateApr 30, 1934
Publication numberUS 2093834 A, US 2093834A, US-A-2093834, US2093834 A, US2093834A
InventorsRichard S Gaugler
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2093834 A
Images(6)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 1937- r R. s. GAUGLER 2,093,834

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed April 30, 1934 6 Sheets-Sheet l R. S. GAUGLER REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Sept. 21, 1937.

Filed April 30, 1934 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 P 1937. R. s. GAUGLER 2,093,834

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed April 30, 1954 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 p 1937- I R. s. GAUGLER 2,093,834

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed April 30, 1934 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 p 937- HR. 5. GAUGLER 2,093,834

REFRIGBRATING APPARATIYS Filed April 30, 1934 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 S p 937- R. s. GAUGLER 2,093,834

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed April 30, 1934 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Patented Sept. 21, 1937 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE General Motors Corporation, Dayton, Ohio, a

corporation of Delaware Application April 30,

11 Claims.

This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus and more particularly to a personal type of air conditioning.

Heretofore air conditioning equipment has been '5 required to condition the air within the entire room or space occupied by persons desiring the comfort of air conditioning. If air conditioning were confined to the immediate vicinity of such persons, the equipment would be much less expensive both in initial cost and in operating expense. An application of this scheme which appears to have great possibilities is that of air conditioning beds since every one spends a continuous period of about one-third of each day in 15 bed.

Attempts have been made to provide air conditioning enclosures for beds, some of which provide a complete enclosure for the bed while another merely provides curtains around the sides of the bed into which the cool air is introduced and confined therein by gravity. The general public,

however,.is unaccustomed to such enclosures and would experience a feeling of confinement which would prevent their widespread use. In addition, the initial cost of such enclosures is considerable and the operating expenses, while less than for a complete room, are still sufiiciently high to prevent their use for those of limited means.

I, by my invention, propose to overcome these objections and to provide a personal type of air conditioning means which in outward appearance and in its use is little different from those replaced thereby and which also is sufilciently low in initial cost and operating expense to permit its purchase and use by persons of limited means.

My air conditioned enclosure employs a covering or enclosure for the body very similar as to material as well as to use and appearance to that now in ordinary use providing therein a means for diflusing the discharge of conditioned air over and surrounding the body to provide an air conditioned environment for the body as well as providing insulating air pockets, and to this enclosure I supply conditioned air or treating medium from a small inexpensive air conditioning or treating device capable of heating and cooling the air as required at a low operating cost.

More specifically I provide a covering for the in a plurality of layers sewed or held together to form a plurality of enclosures into one of which I supply the conditioned air or treating medium from which some of the air diiiuses through the sheeting into contact with the body to provide an body formed of ordinary fabric cloth or sheeting,

1934, Serial No. 723,078

air conditioned environment for the body while some air diffuses through the sheeting into a secnd enclosure to form an inflated insulating air layer.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one form of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view through the mid portion of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 33 of Fig, 2;

Fig. 4 is a modified fragmentary section similar to that shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view along the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 discloses a longitudinal sectional view of the bed shown in Fig. 1 together with a diagrammatic illustration of the air conditioning apparatus and system therefor;

Fig. '7 discloses a sectional view of a bed together with an air conditioning system, shown diagrammatically, illustrating a modified form of my invention embodying recirculation of the air;

Fig. 8 is a plan view of the air blanket shown in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view of the air blanket shown in Fig. 8 taken along the line 9-4 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 10 is a transverse sectional view of the air blanket taken along the line Ill-l0 of Fig. 8;

Fig, 11 is a perspective view disclosing a multiple air conditioning system embodying my invention applicable to twin beds;

Fig. 12 is a longitudinal sectional view through a bed embodying another form of my invention;

Fig. 13 discloses another application of my invention, particularly intended for persons re quired to work in hot or coldplaces;

Fig. 14 discloses a heating apparatus for-the air conditioning suits shown in Fig. 13 suitable for use in an airplane, and

'Fig. 15 discloses another application of my invention in the form of a sleeping bag.

Fig. 16 is a diagrammatic view of a simplified form of control apparatus.

Referring to the drawings and more particularly to Fig. 1, there is shown an ordinary wooden bed 20 provided with springs, a mattress and a pillow in the usual manner together with the usual sheet covering the mattress. However, instead of the ordinary blankets or other bed clothing, I provide what I term an air blanket generally designated by reference character 2|. This air blanket preferably is made up of a plurality of layers or sheet portions of muslin or percale sheeting or other suitable material as best shown in Fig, 2. The lower layer or sheet portion of this air blanket, designated by the reference character 22, is preferably a sheet similar in size to an ordinary bed sheet and may be formed out of similar material which is porous to a certain degree. This sheet extends over the sides and lower end of the bed.

Upon the upper side of the sheet I sew or otherwise suitably fasten a second sheet portion designated by the reference character 23 which may also be made of a similar porous material such as muslin or percale sheeting. This provides an air space between the sheet portion 23 and the sheet 22. In order to prevent the excessive bulging of the sheets when air is supplied to this air space, I connect this sheet and sheet portion by ordinary fabric mesh, screening, or netting designated by reference character 24. This permits the free flow of air through this enclosure and yet prevents excessive bulging of the sheet portion 23.

On top of the sheet portion 23 I provide a second sheet portion 26 which is fastened to the first sheet portion 23 and the sheet 22 by being sewed therethrough around its edge portions and also by being connected at intermediate points by fabric webbing, netting or screening designated by reference character 21 in a manner similar to the netting or screening designated as 24. This provides a second air enclosure 28 between the top sheet portion 26 and the intermediate sheet portion 23. This top sheet portion 26 may be made of the same material as the other sheet portions but if desired may be made of some impervious material. 7

At the foot of the bed or some other convenient place I place an air conditioning apparatus30 enclosed in a neat attractive cabinet which may resemble an ordinary night table. This cabinet may either heat or cool the air and supply the air under pressure through flexible tubing 3| to the sheet 22 at a sufficient rate so that the air beneath the blanket is of substantially the same temperature as the air which is supplied by the air conditioning apparatus. This will providean immediate environment of conditioned air surrounding the person sleeping in the bed. The, air is also filtered in its diffusion through the sheet 22.

Most of the air which thus difluses through the sheet 22 into the spaces beneath the air blanket escapes around the head of the person sleeping in the bed and thus provides conditioned air around the head of the person. If desired, the upper end of the air blanket may be-pulled over the nose of the person so that the person will breathe the conditioned air. This is particularly beneficial to persons afiiicted with hayfever and asthma. While most of the air which is supplied to the air space or enclosure 25 diffuses through the sheet 22 into contact with the persons sleeping in the bed, some diffuses through the intermediate sheet portion 23 into the second enclosure or air space 28, thus forming an insulating air space or insulating air pockets. If the top sheet portion 26 is made of a porous material,

a slow diffused flow of air is thus provided intoand out of the insulating air space 28 thereby carrying away and disposing of any heat leakage from the air in the room so that this insulating air space is maintained at substantially the temperature of the conditioned air supplied to the air blanket and in this way heat transfer is prevented between the air conditioned enclosure beneath the air blanket and the air in the room since the mattress of the bed provides excellent insulation beneath the person and the air conditioned enclosure surrounding the person sleeping. The air blanket may be provided with cross ducts 34 and 35 at the head and foot ends of the blanket as shown in Fig. 3 merely by stopping'the mesh or screening 24 and 21 shortof the head and the foot ends of the intermediate and top sheet portions 23 and 26. sheet and sheet portion by the mesh or screen portions 24 and 21 provides the air blanket with a pleasing fluted appearance when it is inflated with conditioned air. During the daytime when the apparatus is not in use the air blanket may be covered by a spread as is customary. This air blanket is washable and may be readily washed in the usual manner similar to ordinary bed sheets.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 6, for a disclosure of the air conditioning appparatus proper and its application to the air blanket there is illustrateddiagrammatically the cabinet 30 having outer walls 36 forming an enclosure The fastening together of the which is divided into two parts by a partition 31. Within one of the enclosures 38 formed thereby there is provided a refrigerant compressing apparatus including a refrigerant compressor 39 driven by an electric motor 40 for compressing the refrigerant and forwarding the compressed refrigerant to a condenser '4! where thecompressed refrigerant is liquefied and collected in a receiver 42. The condenser 4| and the compressor 39 are cooled by a blast of air provided by the fan 43 driven by the electric fan motor 44 and which creates a pressure within the enclosure 38. By discharging or blowing air over the warm condenser, compressor and electric motor, these units of the refrigerating system are cooled and a source of heated air is provided. Thisheating may be augmented by providing an electric heater 45.

The refrigerant liquefied bythe refrigerant condensing apparatus located within the chamher or compartment 38 is conducted through a refrigerant supply conduit 46 into the comparta,oas,ss4 3 sure within the enclosure 48 to provide a source of cooled air.

Any suitable form of control means may be employed for maintaining the air supplied to the 5 air blanket at a proper temperature but as a preferred form I provide an air selecting or mix- I ing device til comprising a pivoted duct arm OI communicating with the discharge duct 62 connecting through the flexible tubing II to the air space II in the air blanket and capable of selective communication with the enclosures II and 40 within the air conditioned cabinet to provide either heated or cooled air or any-required mixture thereof in order to provide the proper supply of air at a proper temperature and humid' ity to the air space fl within the air blanket 2|. This pivoted duct portion 0| may be automatically moved to its proper selective position by a thermostatic control means which includes a thermostatic'bulb ll charged with a volatile or expansive fluid and located in the air stream of the outlet or discharge duct 02. This thermostatic bulb is connected by tubing 64 to a bellows it which operates a lever 68 connected by a link 61 to the pivoted selective duct portion OI.

This temperature control mechanism is provided with a selective manual adjustment ll comprising spring means and a threaded adjusting means for varying the tension upon the spring means which opposes the expansion of the bellows in varying degrees according to the adjustment thereof so as to make it possible to secure almost any desired temperature of air in the outlet duct 02. However, for ordinary purposes I flnd that a temperature of between 75 F. and 85 F. is most suitable. Where the air tem perature of the room is either greatly warmer or greatly colder than normal. an additional temperature control may be provided including a thermostatic bulb 10 charged with a volatile or thermal expansive fluid and located within the free air within the room. This thermostatic bulb II is connected by tubing I2 to a small metal bellows II connected by a multiplying lever I4 and a link It to the pivoted duct portion OI so as to compensate for the effect of the air temperature of the room upon the heat transfer conditions between the air conditioned space beneath the blanket and the air in the room. This 5 temperature control may also be provided with an adjustable regulating spring I. and a threaded adjusting means 11 to regulate the amount of room temperature compensation provided in the selective thermostatic control.

The pivoted duct portion under the control of the temperature regulating apparatus is moved so that its mouth or inlet portion ll selectively communicates with the outlet ports I. and 18 of the air cooling enclosure 48 and the air heat- 5 ing enclosure 3!. when the mouth ll of the pivoted duct portion I is in direct communication with the port II the maximum cooling is obtained. In intermediate positions the mouth ll of the pivoted duct means 6| may communicate partly with the port II and partly with the port I. so as to supply a mixture of cooled and heated air to the space 25 of the air blanket. In order to supply warm air, the mouth 8| may move to a position in direct communication with the port I! whereby heated air is supplied to the air space 25. If more heating is required, the electric heater 4! is supplied with electric energy by the closing of the switch contacts ll and I, of which the contact U3 is connected to '5 the link I so that when the pivoted duct means is moved to the extreme heating position, this contact It makes engagement with its cooperating contact 84 to close the electric heater circuit 48. In this way sufficiently heated air may be provided even when the room temperature is rather cold. A permanent magnet 35 is pro- 5 vided to prevent arcing of the contacts in opening and closing.

The humidity of the cooled air may be controlled by the temperature of the evaporating means 50. The temperature of the evaporating 10 means Ill may be controlled by a manual adjusting means It provided upon the expansion valve 40 so as to control the evaporating temperature within the evaporator 50 and by this means it is possible to bring the temperature of the air to be cooled below its dew point so as to condense moisture therefrom. This moisture may be collected in a drip pan 8'! located beneath the evaporator Ill.

Likewise, means may be provided for humidifying the warm air when desired by providing a pan l8 containing water which rests upon an electric heater coil 89 connected in parallel electric circuit relation with the electric heater 46. This electric heater 89 evaporates the water at a desired rate in order to supply additional humidity to the air when hot air is required for the air blanket. By employing this humidifying apparatus and by suitably regulating the temperature regulating apparatus to obtain the maximum heating of the air, this apparatus may be employed to produce a mild fever in the person in the bed. In order to use the apparatus for producing a fever the adjusting screws 11 and 68 u are adjusted so as to increase the tension upon the loading springs for the bellows 6i and I3 preferably as far as possible so as to raise the temperature of the air delivered to the bed to 130 or 140 F. The knife switch which controls the energization of the heater 89 is closed and the receptacle 88 is provided with an ample supply of hot water. Under such an adjustment the pivoted duct portion I will move to cover the opening 19 and the contacts 83 and ll will be closed so that the heater I! as well as the heater .9 will be in operation and by heating the water in the receptacle 88 and by heating the air by the compressing apparatus and the electric heater the temperature of the air and the hu- 50 midity will be raised to a point which will cause a fever. The production of a fever may be aided by having a room temperature in which the apparatus is located as high as possible. The use of artificially created fever has been found very useful in treating certain diseases, and with this apparatus, may conveniently be used as an effective treatment forcommon colds. Medicinal compounds may also be placed within the pan to form beneficial vapors. For convenience and clearness, the fans ,43 and 52 have been shown as of the propeller type, but because of the higher efliciency I prefer to use the centrifugal type of fan in each case in order to efliciently provide the necessary air pressure for supplying the conditioned air under pressure to the air space 28 of the air blanket II. The entire apparatus may be controlled by a manual switch 80.

If desired, other means for heating and cooling may be employed such as electric heaters, steam, 70 hot water, or hot air from a heating system for providing heated air while ice, solidifled carbon dioxide, cold water, or cold air may be employed for providing cold air for my air blanket.

Inl'igs.4and5amodifledformofairblanket is shown. In this form a full size sheet of muslin or percale sheeting is employed upon the bottom, this being designated by the reference character I00. Sewed to this full size sheet is a second or intermediate smaller sized sheet portion IOI of a similar material which is sewed to the full size sheet I around the edges thereof and as shown at I02 and is also sewed longitudinally with the stitching in parallel but which stitching terminates short of the head and foot ends of the sheet portion so as to provide cross manifolds, such as the manifold I03, at the foot and head ends of the air blanket. A third or top sheet portion I04 is likewise sewed to the intermediate sheet portion IN and the full size sheet I00 by being sewed to the other sheet portions around its edges as shown at I02 in order to provide the second air space or enclosure. The top sheet portion I04 and the intermediate sheet portion IOI are connected together to prevent bulging, and to present a fluted appearance, by cords or fish netting I05 extending in a zigzag fashion between the sheet portions and which is sewed or fastened to the intermediate sheet portion at the mid points between the sewed connections I06 by the knotting or stitching I01 and is fastened to the top sheet portion by knotting or stitching I08 which is located at the intermediate points of the cord or netting I05 between the stitchings I01. This form provides an air blanket of an attractive fluted appearance which may be easily made.

In Fig. 7, I have shown an air blanket type of air conditioning system which provides for the recirculation of the cooling air. In this air blanket there is shown a lower full sized sheet I20 to which are fastened, by sewing around the edges thereof, sheet .portions I 2| and I22 of substantially equal size. These sheets and sheet portions may be made of any suitable material such as a muslin or percale sheeting. These sheet porupper "sheet portions I2I and I22 are shorter than those found in the form shown in Fig. 6.

' This air blanket has been made in this wayso as to prevent the cooling of the feet. It has been found that some persons feel uncomfortable if their feet are cooled as much as the remainder of their body and for this reason the air blanket shown in Fig. 7 is not provided with the air spaces extending over the feet.

The air blanket I20 shown in longitudinal section in Fig. 7 is better shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10. In this form of air blanket, as stated before, the sheet portions I2I and I22 are sewed to the full size sheet I20 by sewing around the edge portions of the sheet portions I2I and I22. In addition these sheet portions I2I and I22 are sewed to the full size sheet portion I20 along the dotted line I23 shown in Fig. 8 and in Fig. to form a U-shaped return duct I24 in the blanket. The supply duct portions designated by the reference character I25 are formed in the intermediate portions of the air blanket. The air blanket is provided with a distributing airjduct I21 located at the lower or foot end of the sheet portions, which ductdistributes the incoming air through, the fluted supply duct portions I25 through which portion of the air blanket as well as, along both side portions. The sheet portions I22 and I M are connected together and to the full size sheetv I20 by mesh or webbing I28 to form the fluted air blanket structure similar to the first described modiflcation..,,

Referring now again to Fig. '7, there is shown an air conditioning cabinet or enclosure I30 provided with a dividing wall I3I dividing the enclosure into an air heating compartment I32 containing the refrigerant liquefying apparatus I33 and an air cooling enclosure or compartment I34 containing the refrigerant evaporator I35 which is connected through the wall or partition I3I to the refrigerant liquefying apparatus I33. An electrically driven fan I36 is provided for drawing in air from the room through the screen opening I31 and discharging the air over the warm surfaces of the refrigerant liquefying apparatus to heat the air. This heated air may be discharged into the air in the room or into the selective pivoted duct control means I38 through the port I39. An electrically driven fan I connected in electrical parallel circuit relation with the motor driven fan I36 and the electrically driven re'- frigerant liquefying apparatus is provided within the air cooling compartment I34 for drawing air from the room through the screened aperture I42 as well as from the return air duct I43 which 1 connects at a plurality of points with the return air duct I24 in the air blanket I20. This air is discharged over the surfaces of the evaporator out into the room when heated air and not cooled air is required for supplying the proper temperature of air to the air blanket.

The amount of re-circulation may be controlled by the sliding door I46 which is provided for partially or wholly closing the screened open- 7 ing I42 which permits the entrance of air from the room into the cooling compartment I34. The

pivoted selective air duct portion I has a mouth I48 which is adapted to register with either of the outlet ports I39 or I44, wholly or partially,as required, in order tosupply air at the proper temperature to the air blanket. This pivoted duct portion I38 is controlled by a charged thermostat bulb I50 located within the air conditioned enclosure beneath the air blanket within the bed and connected by the tubing I5I to the metal bellows I52 which through a multiplying lever I53 and a link I54 selectively controls the position of the pivoted duct portion I38 and the connection of its mouth with the outlet port's I39 and I44. Manual adjusting means I55 comprising a spring and adjusting screw acting upon the spring means to control the expansion of the metal bellows I52 is provided for regulating the temperature of the air supplied through the air blanket in order to provide an air conditioned environment according to the desires of the person sleeping beneath the blanket. As in the other embodiments the sheets and sheet portions are preferably made porous so that a considerable amount of air diiiuses into the space beneath the air blanket and so provides an air conditioned environment for the person sleeping therein while a lesser portion diffuses into the air spaces provided between the intermediate sheet portion blankets I82 and I80 which may be similar to those illustrated in Figs. 1 to 6 or similar to that shown in Fig. 12. These air blankets I82 and I80 are supplied with properly conditioned air from an air conditioning unit I84 of ample size which discharges the conditioned air under pressure into an outlet duct I88 which conducts the air through a common air manifold I68 and I 01 to the air blankets I82 and I68.

In Fig. 12 there is shown a longitudinal section of a bed and air blanket therefor comprising a full size bottom sheet I10 to which is sewed or otherwise suitably fastened an intermediate sheet portion I'll which extends from the head portion of the full size sheet I10 to a point designated by the reference character I12 which is about above the knees of the person sleeping in the bed beneath the blanket. This sheet portion "I is preferably fastened to the full size sheet I10 by being sewed thereto around its edge portions and being connected by knotting. quilting or similar means at intermediate points to prevent the excessive inflation of this intermediate sheet portion "I. The top sheet portion I18, on the contrary, extends from the head portion of the full size sheet I10 to the extreme foot portion thereof so as to provide an air insulating space over the entire body of the person sleeping under the blanket.

Thus in this form the air is supplied from a suitable conditioning means like that shown in Fig.

6 by the supply duct I18 to the air space I between the intermediate sheet portion Ill and the full size sheet I10. From this air space I15 the air under pressure diffuses through the sheet" I10 into direct contact with the body of the person sleeping thereunder in order to provide an air conditioned environment for the body while some of the air diffuses into the air insulating enclosure I16 which forms an insulating air space over the top of the air enclosure I15 as well as the feet of the person sleeping under the air blanket. This form is very comfortable for both winter and summer use.

In Fig. 13 there are shown two workmen provided with clothing into which 'cool air may be supplied from an air conditioning means I80 through a common supply duct III and individual supply ducts I82 and Ill under the control of the regulating valves I88 and I88. This clothing in the form of Jumpers or air suits I88 and I81 may be made of three sheets or thicknesses of material sewed together so as to provide two air spaces in a manner similar to that of the previously described air blankets- The air is introduced into the air space closest to the body and this air difl'uses therefrom in both directions, some into contact with the body and some into second air space which forms the air insulating space.

However, if desired, these suits may be made similar to the sleeping bag shown in Fig. 15 and the air discharged into the interior of the enclosure provided by the air suits and the air permitted to escape therefrom through one or more layers of the material used. Instead of the air conditioning device shown in Fig. 13 these suits may be supplied with compressed air from a compressed air line which is ordinarily rather cool and low in relative humidity. I find these suits are suitable for working in hot places such as around furnaces in industrial plants as well as for persons subjected to a cold environment such as those working in icehouses or out in the open. For extremely hot situations, the suits should be made of asbestos or similar flreproof cloth; otherwise, ordinary cloth or fabric goods may be used.

These suits may also be used by aviators for high altitude flights and an apparatus like that shown in Fig. 14 may be used for this purpose. In Fig. 14 there is shown an exhaust pipe I80 of the internal combustion engine used for propelling the airplane and surrounding this pipe in heat exchange relation therewith is provided a water or liquid chamber I9I containing water or other fluid I92 which may be evaporated by the heat supplied by the hot exhaust gases. The evaporated liquid rises into the heat exchange device I formed of flns in serpentine tubing through which air is drawn by the electrically driven fan I94 in order to warm the air and this warm air is discharged through the air duct I88 to the air suits. While the air suits I88 and I81 are shown in the form of Jumpers they may take any convenient form such as the form of an overcoat or other types of clothing.

In Fig. 15 there is shown a bed 200 provided with a sleeping bag I capable of receiving a human being and provided with an additional sheet portion 202 providing an insulating air space 203 around the top portions of the' sleeping bag. The sleeping bag 20I completely surrounds the person therein except for the head thereof and is supplied with conditioned air through the air duct 208 which discharges directly into the interior of the bag "I at some suitable point in a manner similar to that described for the air clothing in connection with Fig. 13.

In Fig. 16 there is disclosed a simplified form ofcontrol apparatus applicable to either of the forms of air conditioning apparatus illustrated diagrammatically in Figs. 6 and '7. In this simplifled form, the enclosure containing the evaporating means and the cooled air under pressureis designated by the reference character 88b and is provided with an outlet 18b forming part of a butterfly. type of double two-way control valve. 'I'he enclosure 88b contains the refrigerant liquefying means and wann air under pressure and is provided with an outlet 18b directly opposite the outlet 18b. An outlet 8Ib leading to the room is provided for discharging waste air while the discharge duct 62b connecting with the air blanket connects to the outlet 82b which is directly opposite the outlet 8"). A butterfly valve 83b controls the flow of air from the enclosures 48b and 38b into the discharge duct 82b and the room outlet according to the temperature requirements.

For this purpose, the butterfly valve 88b is provided with an actuating lever arm connected by a link 88b to a multiplying lever 88b operated by a metal bellows 65b under the control of a manually adjustable spring and screw control mechanism. This bellows 88b is connected by tubing to a thermostatic bulb 886 located within the discharge duct 82b and charged with a volatile or thermal expansive fluid.

According to the temperature requirements as measured by the thermostatic bulb 881:, the butterily valve 93b is moved to assume various positions. The butterfly valve may be moved to one extreme position to provide a free flow of air from the cooled air or evaporator enclosure 88b to the discharge duct 82b and from the warm air enclosure 88b directly to the outlet 8") leading directly to the room. When the butterfly valve is moved substantially 90 from this position a free flow of air is provided from the cooled air enclosure to the outlet 9Ib leading to the room and from the warm air enclosure 38b to the discharge duct 621). Under control of the thermostat bulb 63?) the butterfly valve 93b may be moved to any position from one of these extremes to the other in order that air of the proper temperature may be supplied automatically.

Thus, I have provided a personal type of air conditioning equipment which may be used by persons desiring air conditioning equipment with little or no change of personal habits and which is capable of widespread application and is low in both initial cost and operating expense.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A ventilating means including an inflatable covering for the human body, said covering comprising at least three sheet portions of a flexible material held together to form a plurality of enclosures and means for continuously conducting air under pressure into one of the enclosures between two of the sheet portions to keep the covering inflated and in contact with the body, one of the sheet portions being porous to permit the continuous diffused escape of air therefrom into contact with the body.

2. A ventilating means including an inflatable covering for the human body, said covering comprising at least three sheet portions of a flexible material held together to form a plurality of enclosures and means for continuously conducting air under pressure into one of the enclosures between two of the sheet portions, said two sheet portions being porous to permit the diffused escape of air therefrom into contact with the body and into another of the enclosures.

3. A conditioning means including air tempering means, an inflatable covering for a human body, said covering comprising a porous flexible sheet means, said air tempering means including means forcing the air through the flexible sheet means into direct contact with the body, said air tempering means including temperature responsive means for selecting and providing air of the proper temperature for said flexible sheet means.

4. A conditioning means including air tempering means, an inflatable covering for a human body, said covering comprising a porous fabric sheet means, said air tempering means including means for forcing the air through the fabric sheet means into direct contact with the body,

said air tempering means including means for conducting tempered air to the flexible sheet means, and means responsive to the air supplied to the flexible sheet means for controlling the air tempering means.

5. A conditioning means for the human body including body clothing having a plurality of layers of fabric forming a plurality of superimposed air spaces therebetween, and means for supplying air under pressure into one of the air spaces between the layers of fabric, said fabric permitting the diffused discharge of air therefrom into contact with the body.

6. A conditiomng means including an inflatable covering for the human body, said covering comprising a plurality of sheet portions of a flexible material held together to form an enclosure, another sheet portion of a flexible material being joined to one" of the above mentioned sheet portions to form a larger enclosure covering a larger area, and means for introducing air into the first mentioned enclosure.

7. An inflatable article for providing a zone of ventilated air in the vicinity of a body, said article sures, and means for continuously conducting air under pressure to one of said enclosures, to inflate the enclosures and to provide a diffused discharge of air upon the body.

8. An inflatable article for providing a zone of ventilated air in the vicinity of a body, said article including at least three sheet portions of flexible material positioned one on top of the other and held together to form two enclosures between the sheets located one above the other, said sheet portions having means providing communication between said enclosures, one of said sheet portions nearest the body being porous to permit the diffused escape of a fluid from one of the enclosures, means for connecting dispersed portions of said sheet portions to limit the distance between the sheets, and means for continuously conducting air under pressure to one of said enclosures, to inflate the enclosures and to provide a diffused discharge of air upon the body.

9. An inflatable article for providing a zone of ventilated air in the vicinity of a body, said article including at least three sheet portions of flexible material positioned one on top of the other and held together to form two enclosures between the sheets located one above the other, said sheet portions having means providing communication between said enclosures, said sheet portions being quilted to limit the distance between the sheets and to provide a neat tufted appearance, and means for conducting air to one of said enclosures.

10. An inflatable article for providing a zone of ventilated air in the vicinity of a body, said article comprising a plurality of sheet portions positioned upon one another and held together to form an enclosure between the sheet portions,

means for conditioning air and conducting the conditioned air under pressure to said enclosure between the sheet portions, one of said sheet portions nearest the body being porous to provide for the discharge of air from the enclosure into contact with the body, and means responsive to the temperature of the air within said conducting means for controlling said conditioning means.

11. An inflatable article for providing a zone of ventilated air in the vicinity of a body, said article comprising a plurality of sheet portions positioned upon one another and held together to form an enclosure between the sheet portions, one of said sheet portions nearest the body being of porous fabric to provide for the discharge of air from the enclosure into contact with the body, means for heating and cooling air, mixing means for providing any desired proportion of the heated and cooled air, temperature responsive means for selecting the proper proportion of heated and cooled air, and means for conducting the air selected by the temperature responsive means to said enclosure between the sheet portions.

ltICI-IARD S. GAUGLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460269 *Mar 16, 1945Feb 1, 1949William R AppeldoornPersonal body air conditioning device
US2512559 *Jan 18, 1945Jun 20, 1950Alfred L W WilliamsComfort unit
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Classifications
U.S. Classification4/536, 165/48.1, 34/90, 5/284, 5/423, 126/204, 236/12.17, 5/502, 165/253, 62/261, 34/77, 607/107, 126/205, 454/197, 5/941
International ClassificationA41D13/005, A61F7/00, F25D15/00, A61F7/02, A47G9/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25D15/00, A61F7/0053, A61F2007/0274, A61F7/0097, A47G9/0215, A61F2007/0064, Y10S5/941, A41D13/0053
European ClassificationA47G9/02A2, F25D15/00, A41D13/005C, A61F7/00B