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Publication numberUS2094801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1937
Filing dateMay 17, 1935
Priority dateMay 19, 1934
Publication numberUS 2094801 A, US 2094801A, US-A-2094801, US2094801 A, US2094801A
InventorsMass Willy
Original AssigneeMass Willy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof for gardens
US 2094801 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

" Oct. 5, 1937. w.- MAss ,09

ROOF FOR GARDENS Filed Ma-y 17, 1935 2 SheetS-Shet 1 Snventor.

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ttornegs.

Oct. 5, 1937. W.-MASS 2,094,801

.ROOF FOR GARDENS Filed May 17, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.'

M Mass I A; TOW

Patented Oct. 5, 1937,

PATEN @HE ROOF FOR GARDENS Willy Mass, Bad Godesberg, Germany Application May 17, 1935, Serial No. 22,099 in Germany May 19, 1934 5 Claims.

This invention relates to a kind of roof for garden inns, concert gardens, open air theaters and similar establishments.

As is known, the economy of such establishments depends upon the weather. Often great preparations and provisions are in vain since the weather does not permit to stay in the open air.

The invention consists therein that the area to be covered is subdivided by a framework con sisting of uprights and supporting rails and surpassing the height of trees in such manner that removable, frameless transparent roof-plates can be inserted in rows which are arranged to slide on the supporting rails and when opened can be placed one above the other, thus laying open a considerable part of the area of the garden. In such manner the character of the open garden is retained to the garden establishment without the risk of being disturbed by the irregularities of the weather.

. In detail the accomplishment of the new roofing depends upon the situation and the form of the garden plant. A rectangular plant is preferably subdivided longitudinally and transversely, the rails supporting the roof elements being inclined more or less. In order to permit of a convenient disposal of the gutters the undermost sections may be stationary so that the sections lying above can be lifted obliquely like Venetian blinds.

The invention is illustrated by the annexed drawings showing a rectangular roof having two and/ or three sliding sections above one stationary section.

Fig. 1 is a cross section taken between two supporting rails, and showing my improved roof with two sliding sections,

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross section of a part of the roof shown in Fig. 1, the roof sections being carried by a broad flanged double-T-beam this view illustrating the supporting means for the portion of the upper section intermediate its ends,

Fig. 2a is a view similar to Fig. 2, but showing the manner of supporting the adjoining ends of a pair of upper roof sections,

Fig. ,3 is a perspective view showing diagrammatically the method of leading the rope to the outer (upper) roof section,

Fig. 4 shows the suspension of a pulling roll or pulley at an outer roof section.

Fig. 5 is a vertical cross sectional view similar to Fig. 2, but showing three slidable roof sections, and Fig. 5a is a vertical cross sectional view similar to Fig. 201,, but illustrating three slidable roof sections.

In Figures 1 to 3 l, 2, and 3 are uprights on which one of the broad flanged double-T-rails i are supported. The rail 3 is welded together with the upright i, whereas it rests on the uprights 2 and 3 by rolls 5 and t to withstand infiuences of temperature. The stationary roof section I is arranged beneath the rail l, whereas the middle roof section 8 is movable between the upper and the lower flange, and above the upper flange of the rail l each outer roof section 93 moves. The roof sections 8 and 8 are supported by means of rolls l0 and Ml on rails H and ii secured at the edge of the lower flange of the rail i. The projecting edges 52 and it of the middle roof sections partially overlap the space between the rib l3 of the rail 4 and the rails H, so that rain water or the like runs from the roof section into the gutters formed between H, H and I3 and from here is conducted to the end M of the rail Q, where eaves l5 receive the water.

Each one of the upper roof sections 9 may freely extend over several rails t, as shown in Fig. 3, and said sections may be supported on rollers it, it, It" mounted on guide rails I1, I17, ll secured to the upper surface of the supporting rails i. As shown in Fig. 2, the guide rails l1 supporting the intermediate portion of each upper section is secured to the central portion of the supporting rail 4, whereas the guide rails ll, ll supporting adjoining ends of a pair of said upper sections are secured to the outer edges of said supporting rail 4 so as to form another gutter between said adjoining roof sections for the regular withdrawal of rain water.

In the event three or more slidable sections are to be employed in the construction of my im-, proved roof, the two lower sliding sections will be constructed and operate in the same manner, with the exception that the lower one of said two sections will be supported on guide rails secured to the lower flange of the cross beam or rail i, while the second, or upper one of these two sections will rest on guide rails secured to the outer edges of the upper flange of the supporting rail t. As shown in Fig. 5, the portion of the upper sliding section 9, intermediate its ends, is supported by a'single guide rail 39 secured to the upper surface of the supporting rail 5. The guide bar or rail 39 in this embodiment of the invention is disposed between the adjoining ends of a pair of intermediate sliding sections ill and extends upwardly from the upper surface of the supporting rail 4 a distance sufficient to permit the upper section 9 to slide freely thereon. In Fig. 5a,

I have illustrated the manner of supporting the adjoining ends of a pair of upper sections 9 where three slidable sections are employed in the construction of the roof. In carrying out this feature of my invention, I employ a second double T-beam 4| mounted on the lower double T-beam or supporting rail d. This second beam 4| is provided with a narrow lower flange 62 adapted to fit between the guide rails on the upper surface of the lower beam 4. The upper flange of the beam 6! is provided with a pair of guide rails 43, similar to theguide rails l1, l1" of the structure shown in Fig. 2a. The rails 43 are adapted to receive rollers 44 carried by the adjoining ends of two sections 9.

The movement of the sections is accomplished by ropes engaging the upper roof section '9 to which tappets I8 are secured engaging the middle sections 8, 8 &c. and overlapping the latter draw them along. The rope i9 is wound on a.

rightand left-handed drum 26 of the lifting jack 2|. The two ropes coming from the drum run over the pulleys 22 and 23 to the pulleys Hand 25 arranged near the front edge of the roof. One rope runs over the pulley 26 to the pulley 21, arranged at the engaging point on the upper roof section 9, whereas the other rope is conducted over the pulley 28 to the second engaging point on the upper roof section 9' and the pulley 29. Then both ropes are returned to the pulleys 2'56 and BI between which they unite again. In this way a compensation is accomplished, equal forces always engaging the pulleys 27 and 29, so'that no oblique pull can be exerted on the upper roof section.

In view of the considerable weight of the various sliding sections running on inclined tracks it is absolutely necessary to provide for safeguards against accidents in case the rope breaks.

'; For this purpose the pulleys 21 and 29 are sus- 5; acting'in the direction of the arrow is released,

" and the frame 32 falls down, and the hook 34 engages one of the abutments 35 provided on the supporting rail 4, whereby the roof section is locked.

To exclude an excessive movement when opening or closing the roof sections, automatic disconnecting means may be provided for the lifting jack 2| in the well-known manner, which meansare operated by abutting on the roof section 9. Preferably the sliding roof sections are made to abut on resilient stops as shown in Fig. 1 to a soft arresting of the motions.

I claim: V

'1. A roofing for a garden or the like, comprising a framework composed of uprights and double T-beams carried by said uprights,,rails fixed on the flanges of said beams, and roof sections running on said rails and adapted to slide one above the other and overlap one another like Venetian blinds, the central rib and flanges of each beam, together with the trails on said flanges section and three sliding sections arranged one above the other, the lowest of which runs between the central ribs of said supporting beams, and the middle one of which runs on bars fixed on the outer edges of the upper flanges of said supporting beams.

3. A roofing for a garden or the like, comprising a framework composed of uprights and supporting beams dividing the area of the garden into a number of sections, and transparent roof sections adapted to slide one above the other, overlapping one another like Venetian blinds and adapted to be retracted in series uncovering a considerable part of the area of said garden, said roof sections including a stationary section and a plurality of sliding sections, the outermost section being operated by means of a rope engaging said section at two points remote from one another and connected with one another by a device equalizing the forces'aeting at both points.

4. A roofing for a garden or the like, comprising a framework composed of uprights and supporting beams dividing the area of the garden into a number of sections, and transparentrroof sections adapted to slide one above the other, overlapping one another like Venetian blinds and adapted to be retracted in series uncovering a considerable part of the area of said garden, said roof sections including a stationary section and a plurality of sliding sections, the outermost section being operated by means of an endless rope engaging the section at two points remote from one another and connected with one another by a device equalizing the forces acting at both points, the rope being conducted over rollers and connecting the said engaged points.

5. A roofing for a garden or the like, comprising a framework composed ofuprights. and supporting beams dividing the area of the garden into a number of sections, and transparent roof sections adapted to slide one above the other, overlapping one another like Venetian blinds and adapted to be retracted in series uncovering a considerable part of the area of said gardemsaid roof sections including a stationary section and. a plurality of sliding sections, the outermost section being operated by means of an endlessrope engaging the section at two points remote from one another and connected with one another by

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3589084 *Apr 3, 1969Jun 29, 1971Kalwall CorpTranslucent wall-panel enclosure
US3662410 *Sep 22, 1970May 16, 1972Glamour Pools CoEnclosures for pools and the like
US4110941 *Mar 14, 1977Sep 5, 1978Scott Robert KInstant open goose and duck pit cover
US4283889 *Dec 19, 1979Aug 18, 1981Dunn Michael DGreenhouse construction
US4495978 *Dec 10, 1981Jan 29, 1985Carroll Frank EInsulating shutter panels for building openings
US4528785 *Aug 20, 1982Jul 16, 1985Jager Johannes A DeDisplaceable roof structure
US4608788 *Dec 5, 1983Sep 2, 1986William H. PorterAdjustable overhang panel for building eave
US4610291 *Jan 15, 1985Sep 9, 1986Carroll Frank EInsulating shutter panels for building openings
US4727898 *Jan 29, 1987Mar 1, 1988Tesfa GumaPortable automatic cover
US4739593 *Mar 6, 1986Apr 26, 1988Bernhard JankeTerrace glass enclosure
US4827957 *Dec 28, 1987May 9, 1989Chang Te ChengShelter used to protect plants or crops from adverse environmental conditions
US5511348 *Oct 8, 1991Apr 30, 1996Steelcase Inc.Furniture system
US5724778 *May 25, 1995Mar 10, 1998Steelcase Inc.Furniture system
US6134844 *Jun 24, 1997Oct 24, 2000Steelcase Inc.Method and apparatus for displaying information
US6138417 *Mar 4, 1998Oct 31, 2000Florida Enclosure Systems, Inc.Roof structure for enclosures for swimming pools or patios and the like having removable and/or stackable roof panels
US6170200Aug 27, 1999Jan 9, 2001Steelcase Development Inc.Furniture system
US6629386Sep 13, 2000Oct 7, 2003Steelcase Development CorporationFurniture system
US6851227Jun 5, 2002Feb 8, 2005Adam T. Schildge, Jr.Retractable roof for a mall or other space
US6922949Apr 18, 2003Aug 2, 2005Steelcase Development CorporationFurniture system
US8701356 *Jul 18, 2012Apr 22, 2014Cabrio Companies LlcStructure having convertible roof and walls
US8707632 *Jul 30, 2012Apr 29, 2014Cabrio Companies LlcStructure having convertible roof and walls
US9140014 *Feb 22, 2013Sep 22, 2015Jean-Louis CastelCovering device having sliding cover elements
US20120291363 *Jul 30, 2012Nov 22, 2012Forsland Kent HMoveable building structure
US20130042541 *Jul 18, 2012Feb 21, 2013Cabreeco Companies LlcConvertible enclosure
US20150013238 *Feb 22, 2013Jan 15, 2015Jean-Louis CastelCovering device having sliding cover elements
US20170145682 *Sep 28, 2016May 25, 2017Cabrio Companies LlcConvertible enclosure
EP0298528A1 *May 13, 1988Jan 11, 1989Wizo International N.V.Sliding roof structure, more specifically veranda roof
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/64, 47/22.1
International ClassificationE04B7/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04B7/166
European ClassificationE04B7/16T