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Publication numberUS2095038 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1937
Filing dateSep 14, 1933
Priority dateSep 14, 1933
Publication numberUS 2095038 A, US 2095038A, US-A-2095038, US2095038 A, US2095038A
InventorsRagot Charles L
Original AssigneeSamuel R Burns
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tape moistening apparatus
US 2095038 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1937. c. L. RAGOT TAPE MOISTENING APPARATUS Fil ed Sept. 14, 1933 INVENTOR ch 01' g I I ATI'ORNEY I Has LuKaa BY Patented Oct. 5, 1937 TAPE MOISTENING APPARATUS Charles L. Ragot, Easton, Pa;, assignor to Samuel R. Burns, Newark, N. J.

Application September 14', 1933, Serial No. 689,337

8 Claims.

This invention pertains to a novel construction of apparatus which moistens gummed tape, labels, or the like, as they are moved to a position to be applied to the selected containers or products.

This invention also relates to an improved. moistening apparatus which may be readily adjusted to increase or decrease the amount of moisture available at the point of applying the same to the tape or label or the like.

One of the main features of this invention is to provide a novel apparatus for applying, dispensing, distributing, or spreading moisture to or upon extended areas or surfaces in a uniform manner, and more particularly to efficiently apply moisture when there is a relative motion between the applicator portion of the apparatus and the surfaceor area to be moistened. This improved apparatus is particularly adapted where the requirements are intermittent, spasmodic, or otherwise inconstant or irregular, although its performance is very efficient where the speed of the tape or the like is constant.

A further feature of the invention is to provide means whereby the moistening process is automatic in operation and compensates for variations in demand due to changes in velocity of the relative motion in order that the result will be a constant and uniform film of moisture regardless of velocity changes, interruptions, or cessation in When too much moisture is applied to a' gummed surface, the tendency is either to flush off the gum, or else the adhesive quality is impaired or even destroyed altogether due to slippage or premature loosening from the object or r part to which the moistened surface may be applied. 'On the other hand, when there is a lack or deficiency of moisture, the gummed surface is not fully softened or dissolved and an unsound seal is the result.

Heretofore, various methods have been used and under the most favorable conditions these methods have been inefficient due to certain inherent disadvantages, namely opposite extremes of wetness or dryness, with their attendant nuisances of flooding, gumming up, clogging, and' general messiness, all contributing to a lack of uniformity in the result, and unreliable performance.

In order to overcome and eliminate the disadvantages enumerated above and to provide a- 'ai uniform and constant moisture under any and all conditions to be met in practice, this invention makes use of mechanical means combined with certain structural features, so arranged and disposed as to function automatically, and with lO but few moving parts. Inaddition to these advantages, the device is compact, inexpensive and simpleto manufacture, and is adaptable as to arrangement and location on a machine, and flex- M N ible as to pos-ition in itsdirection of operation whether upward, downward, sidewise, edgewise, or at any angle with the horizontal; Furthermore, the gummed face may beeither uppermost or underneath without impairing the full and proper function and complete performance of the novel device. 7 V 7 One of the principal features which is incorporated in, this applicator is a circulatory system 7 for the moistening fluid which includes all of the My elements to accomplish the object and scope thereof, and there is illustrated one device embodying the elements in detail with the annexed drawing and text in which like reference numbers refer to the same designated parts'in both.

Fig. 1 shows a side elevation of one form of the tape holder and the moistening element, without the circulatory system; I r V s Fig. 2 is a sectional view on line 2 -'2 of Fig. 1, showing the moistening element within its jacket; ,7

Fig. 3 shows a detail, partly in section, of the 5' moistening element on line 33 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 4 is a view showing the arrangement of the circulatory system in conjunction withFig; 2.

Referring to Fig.1, a backing plate 5 carries a 7, side memberfi which acts as a support fora roll of tape I mounted to rotate freely on pin 8. A roller 9, pivoted at If), guides the tape II with the gummed face to the left, onto the backing plate. From there the tape passes between side W member 8 and guides l2 and I3, and under a porous element 14 protruding from ajacket l5 which is supported by arms Iii pivoted at IT. The porous element is held yieldingly against the tape by means of spring l8, adjustable at l 9, and which may be swung away from the backing plate and rested against stop pin 20 to facilitate threading of the tape through the device.

The circulatory system is illustrated in Fig. 4 in conjunction with Fig. 2, in which a circulating pump 2|, driven by a belt 22 from some source of power, not shown, draws fluid 23 from container 24 through suction pipe 25' and sends it upwards through feed duct 26 to cavity 21 in the jacket l behind the porous element l4. Return duct 28 drains the fluid back to the container through orifice 29 of dribble pipe 30 which is adjustable vertically at 3|. In this case, bracket 32 is mounted rigidly tobase 33 bymeans of post 34.

- Dribble pipe 30 is telescopically mounted in rela- V tion to vent tube 35 allowing free access to the atmosphere by means of gap 36. Pump 2| is mounted on base 33 in a rigid manner while con- 'tainer .24 is shown mounted removably for purposes of cleaning same or renewing or replenishing the fluid supply therein.

.As shown in Fig. 2 the cavity in the jacket is preferably located 'at the highest point in the circulatory system so that when the pump is stopped, the weight of the fluid remaining in the return duct and kept in suspensionbyatmospheric pressure and surface tension due to the constricted proportionof the duct, will prevent any of the residual fluid'fromflowing toward the surface to'be, moistened. 'Even after prolonged interruption of service, if the fluid should j trickle out of the system, it would drain toward the container in both the feed and return ducts leaving the porous element free from flooding.

Having outlined the various parts of the inventionand theirrelationship to the 'whole, the operation is explained as follows: 1 3 'When itis desired to use the device aslillustrated, the pump is set in motion andjat once the fluid will be brought upward through'the suction pipe and then passthroughthe feed duct to the cavity inthe jacket. The-'excesslamounts'a return by syph onic action through the return duct andissue from the ori flcein the dribble pipe "to fallffree by gravity to the container from 'whence it started- Thus it is plain that the; fluid may be circulated over and over again, and while on its circuit keeps the cavity in the jacket filled. This fluid is therefore in contact withthe inner end of the porouselement which saturates 7 The several elements constituting the circuilating system are so proportioned and disposed' that they establish a hydraulic balance. Normally the positive pressure generated bythe pump to raise the fluid to the cavity behind the porous element is counteracted by an equal negative pressure brought about by the 'weight of the 7 column of fluid in the return duct.

return duct.

' By this syphon arrangement any pressure on the porous element from within is avoided. This balance, however, is subject to adjustment by varying the'height of the fluid columnin the re- This-is accomplished by raising or 1 of i the return duct,

lowering the vertical position of the outlet orifice volume of fluid deliverediby the pump will keep :the ducts filled, especially on the return-side, to prevent'the system :from. becoming'air bound. 1

In practice ;it has'been found that with the variouselements properly proportioned and disposed, awide range, of moisture availabilitycan be produced, from a flooding maximum asone extreme, to actual absence of beads of moisture on'theexposed portion of porous element. I4 as the other; even to sucking up fluid from an outsidesupply by'the porous element [4 may be accomplished if the dribble pipe is lowered sufli In order to obtainian effective syphonic'effect, the capacity of the pump and the diameter and 7 positions of the ducts should be so related that the "ciently. It naturally follows that somewhere between these extremes there is a positionwhich will produce and maintain the exact moisture 7 7 required.

The degree of saturation of the porous element M may readily be regulated by the adjustment, f

provided the range of the effective adjustment is sufficient, plus and minus, from a normal moisture flow so as to give the desired results in wetting a tape. The apparatus isoriginally assembled and adjusted to function properly to properly wet the tape which is to be moved at a definite speed; However, the apparatus has sufficient flexibility so that changes in speed of the tape movement from its normal rate will not cause the moistening apparatus to become ineffective, but the tape will be properly wet during these changes in speed by reason of the stored moisture in the device and especially in the porous element l4: If

the speed of tape is to be at a higher rate for a' considerable length of time, then the apparatus is to be adjusted to permit more moisture tobe fed to the 'porousjelement. mThisadjustment is readily made by, changing the height of the dribble pipe. Should the speed of tape be below that of the normal speed, then the moisture flow from the pump will flow along into the dribble pipe 28 and be carriedaway. 'It will be noted that I if there is a large amountof moisture backing up the porous element HI, that beads of moisture will" be formed on the exposed surface of porous. element [4 if there is no'tape in engagement with the porous elementat the time, or if the tape is j in engagement beads will form on the sides of .f V n V "35.: i.-

the porous element v i When the] device istobe used in conjunction adjustable head of the machine, not shown, and carried with it in unison'up or down. In this manner, by maintaining. the setting of the vertical distance between the cavity in the jacket and the orifice in the dribble pipe, the moistening ability would remain uniform and undisturbed,

although the head may-be raised or lowered. The pump in this case may be driven by the ma- ,chine so that when the machine is stopped the circulation of fluid ceases.

' The invention herein described is, therefore self-contained, including not onlythe elements to make 'it function properly; and automatically, W

but also includes means for regulating or controlling the basic amount of moisture availability at the porous element. Thus'if a pieceof tape be passed with: its gummed face against the porous :element, it will carry 01f fluid at a certainirate per unit of length of tape, regardless of the length passed at one draw, and no matter at whatspeed, whether fast or slow," either at a uniform, accel crating or retarding rate of feed; Sucnchanges in speed tape from the normal speed of the tape.

still do not effect'the proper moistening of the tape, as those, changes in speed would'only be temporary and the moisten-ing device has stored moisture therein so that the tape will be properly wet under'the temporary'changes of the speed of the tape. The fluid'in the cavity seeps. thru the r porous element by capillary action and continupasses from the pump to the chamber 21 and by capillary action some of it passes into porous -element l4 and the remainder passes toreturn duct 28 and from there to dribble pipe 39. With this construction it will be seen that there is a closed system starting from the fluid in the reservoir 24 through pipe 25, through pump 2!, duct 26 to cavity 2? to return duct 28 and dribble pipe 30 back into the reservoir. It will also be noted that no air passes backward through dribble pipe 311 or return duct 28. Thus, with this structure the moistening device itself containingthe porous element l4 and the pipe connections to and from thereto, constitute a closed piece of apparatus which in some uses of this device may be considered as being a closed by draulic system.

It will therefore be particularly noted that the moistening element is never flooded and is never dry unless there is maladjustment in the proportions or installation of the apparatus. The novel device herein is particularly adapted to be employed in any manner or under such circumstances wherein it is desired to moisten a tape, label or other like articles, and that the device may be adjusted for different installations so that its most eflicient operation may be obtained.

It is understood by those versed in the art that the accompanying drawing shows only one of the many arrangements of the several units and elements, and that radical departures from this specific form could be made without departing from the spirit, scope, and purpose of my invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A moisture applicator capable of intermittent use without dripping when not in use comprising a porous element, a closed jacket except for an opening for receiving said porous element, said porous element filling at least a majority of the space of said jacket and filling said opening, means for delivering fluid from a reservoir to said jacket, and a separate and adjustable means connected to said jacket for immediately draining substantially all of the surplus fluid therefrom to said reservoir when said device is stopped, said adjustable means acting to vary the amount of fluid pressure in said porous element during the time said applicator is in use.

2. In a moisture applicator for gummed tape and the like capable of intermittent use without dripping when not in use, the combination of a closed container except for an opening, a porous element mounted in said container and adapted to fill more than one-half of said container and to fill said opening tightly and having a portion protruding therefrom adapted to engage the tape to be moistened, closed means connecting with said container for supplying moistening fluid thereto, and closed outlet means also connecting with said container for draining substantially all of the fluid from said container not used at the point of tape application and not held by said porous element.

3. In a moisture applicator for gummed tape and the like and being capable of intermittent operation without dripping when not in, use, the combination of a closed container except for an opening, a porous element mounted said container and adapted to fill said opening tightly and having a portion protruding therefrom adapted to engage the tape to be moistened,

closed means connected to said container for supplying moistening fluid thereto, and closed outlet means also connecting with said container for draining immediately substantially any fluid from said container not used at the point of application and not held by saidporous element, said fluid supply means being maintained at a substantially constant rate of flow of fluid, and.

said fluid outlet means being of relatively small cross sectionv area and being adjustable to give an effective vertical change in the positionv of the end of said outlet means to differentially regulate the flow of fluid through said porous element and through said outlet means. 7

4. In a moisture applicator for gummed tape and the like capable of being used intermittently without dripping when not in use, the combination of a closed container, except for an opening, a porous element mounted in said container and adapted to fill said opening tightly and having'a portion protruding therefrom adapted to engage the tape to be moistened, closed means connected to said container for supp-lying moistening fluid thereto, and closed outlet means also connectting with said container for immediately substantially draining any fluid from said container not used at the point of contact with the tape and not held by said porous element, said closed container being mounted at a point higher than said fluid supply means and said fluid outlet means, said fluid outlet means being adjustable vertically to regulate the amount of excess fluid draining from said closed container and there;- fere the amount of moistening fluid issuing from said porous element to the tape.

5. A closed system moisture applicator capable of intermittent use without dripping comprising a closed jacket except for an opening, a porous element mounted in said jacket and having a portion extending outwardly through said opening to engage the surface of a strip tobe wetted and having a portion thereof filling the opening in the jacket, inlet means connected to said jacket through which fluid is supplied to said porous element, and a closed outlet means connected to said jacket for draining surplus fluid away from said porous element, said draining means being constricted to provide some resistance to fluid outflow, said outlet means being adjustable to vary the resistance of outflow and thereby the I degree of saturation in said porous element, said outlet means also acting to drain ofi fluid remaining in said jacket and not held by said porous element when the supply of fluid ceases, said porous element retaining its content of fluid when said outlet means has drained the free fluid from within said jacket.

6. A closed system moisture applicator cap able'of intermittent use without dripping com-- prising a closed jacket except for. an opening, a

tem wherein said jacket is above the source of fluid supply and above the open end of the outlet means, said outlet draining means being con- 7 stricted to provide some resistance to fluid outflow, said outlet means being adjustable to'vary the resistance of the outflow and thereby the degree of saturation in said porous element, said "outlet means acting also to drain of]? any fluid remaining in said jacket not held by said porous element when the supply of fluid to said jacket ceases, said porous element retaining its content of fluid when said outlet means has drained the free fluid from within said jacket.

7. A closed system moistening applicator capable of intermediateuse without dripping, comprising a jacket closed except for an opening, a

' fluid reservoir mounted belowsaid jacket, a supvary the resistance to outflow and thereby the degree of saturation in said porous element, said outlet means acting also to drain off any fluid remaining in said jacket not held by said porous element when the supply of fluid ceases, said porous element retaining its content of fluid when said'outlet means has drained the free fluid from within said jacket. I

8. In a moisture applicator having a closed fluid system including a jacket, a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet connected thereto, and a porous element mounted in said jacket for receiving and dispensing the moistening fluid, a method of op-- erating said moisture applicator which consists in maintaining a substantially uniform degree of moisture at the point of applying the moisture to an article by said porous element, said method including the steps of supplying moistening fluid to said porous element, removing fluid not taken up by said porous element while said applicator is in operation, and preventing dripping of moisture from said porous element by draining off substantially all fluid not held within said porous element after the cessation of the flow of inlet fluid. r

CHARLES L. RAGOT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2565370 *Mar 6, 1947Aug 21, 1951Ditto IncMoistening means for duplicating machines
US4380210 *Dec 21, 1981Apr 19, 1983Pitney Bowes Inc.Workpiece moistening system
US4836132 *Jul 21, 1988Jun 6, 1989Pitney Bowes Inc.Wick cartridge assembly
US4962721 *Dec 8, 1988Oct 16, 1990Sewell Plastics Inc.Apparatus for coating a container with a liquid
US4995934 *Jul 3, 1989Feb 26, 1991Pitney Bowes Inc.Wicking apparatus for envelopes
US20120090791 *Oct 17, 2011Apr 19, 2012Omar BlanchfieldGummed tape dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/429, 118/264, 118/256, 118/235
International ClassificationB65H35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65H35/0046
European ClassificationB65H35/00B2D