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Publication numberUS2096351 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1937
Filing dateFeb 8, 1936
Priority dateFeb 8, 1936
Publication numberUS 2096351 A, US 2096351A, US-A-2096351, US2096351 A, US2096351A
InventorsOtto C Semonsen
Original AssigneeOtto C Semonsen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Encircling band and method of producing same
US 2096351 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 19, 1937. o. c. SEMONSEN ENCIRCLING B AND AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME Filed Feb. 8, 1936 INVENT OR.

ATTORNEY.

" Patented Oct. 19, 1937 UNITED STATES ENCIRCLING BAND AND DUCING S Mn'rnon or Pao- AME Otto C. Semonsen, Belleroae, N. Y.

Application February 8, 1936, Serial No. 83,037

50mins.

This invention relates to bands for encircling cigars, confections, food stuffs, soaps and other toilet requisites, socks, gloves, hosiery and other articles of apparel, threads and yarns, station- 5 ery, and other articles and materials, or packages and containers enclosing the foregoing, where such a band serves as a binding medium or for the purpose of enhancing the appearance of the article or closure, and in particular a band having an adhesive surface at each end on opposites sides thereof and which surfaces are placed together and caused to adhere by pressure, to unite the ends of the band together.

Encircling bands as presently employed are usually coated at one end thereof with paste, glue, mucilage or other adhesive which is wet or wetted at the time the band is being placed around the article and unless great care is exercised in placing the band end coated with wet adhesive in superposed contact with the opposite band end, the adhesive is smeared onto the article with resultant soiling of the article or the band becoming attached to the article. Also a wet adhesive is objectionable in the operation of automatic machines for applying encircling bands, as such an adhesive interferes with the normal functioning of the automatic feeding,

conveying and applying devices of such a machine.

I propose to avoid these diiflculties by providing an encircling band having a coating of adhesive at each end on opposite sides thereof and which coatings will adhere only to each other and will cause the band to be united together when pressure is applied to the overlapped ends thereof, at the time the band is placed around the article.

I also propose to employ a method of applying such an adhesive at the opposite ends of the band on opposite sides thereof so that difliculties normally to be encountered in the manufacture of such a band will be obviated.

It is therefore the primary object of my invention to provide an improved and novel form of encircling band having a coating of adhesive at each end on opposite sides thereof and which adhesive by adherence under pressure will unite together the ends of the band. I

It is another object of my invention toprovide an encircling band having such a coating of adhesive applied on opposite sides at the ends thereof with an uncoated protective area between the edges of the coatings of adhesive and the band edges.

55 It is another object of my invention to provide a method of applying such a coating of adhesive that the location thereof is controlled to avoid difliculties to be encountered under known practices.

It is a further object of my invention to pro- 5 vide a method by which such coatings of adhesive may be applied to a plurality of bands that are disposed together in predetermined attached relationship and individual bands produced therefrom through the use of well-known de- 10 vices and at the same time avoid difficulties therein.

With these and other objects in view which will readily appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, the same consists in 15 the improved construction and novel arrangement and combination of parts which will be hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawing has been illus- 20 trated a simple and preferred form of the invention; it being understood however that no limitation is necessarily made to the precise structural details therein shown, but that alterations and modifications within the scope of the ap- 25 pended claims may be resorted to when desired.

Also while the word band has been used for purposes of brevity, it is to be understood that this term shall broadly include labels or other forms of encircling or wrapping devices which 30 are analogous to bands.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 illustrates: a fragment of a large sheet on which is depicted a plurality of shaped bands, and showing the coating of adhesive on the ob- 5 verse side of the band. In this view the shaped bands are shown as a plurality of bands in a plurality of rows and with indications of the manner in which the individual bands are separated from each other by a die plate;

Fig. 2 illustrates a fragment of a large sheet on which is depicted a plurality of oblong bands and the manner of separating them from each other and from the sheet. The coating of adhesive is also shown on the obverse side of the 45 hand in this view;

Fig. 3 illustrates an individual band or flat strip died from a sheet such as illustrated in Fig.

1 and shows the coating of adhesive on both the obverse and reverse sides thereof; 50

Fig. 4 shows the flat strip or band illustrated in Fig. 3 after the ends have been united together by pressure to cause adherence between the coatings of adhesive;

Fig. 5 illustrates an oblong band or flat strip and the edges of the bands II.

separated by cutting from a sheet such as shown in Fig. 2 and shows the coating of adhesive on both the obverse and reverse sides of the band; and

Fig. 6 shows the oblong flat strip or band illustrated in Fig. 5 with its ends partially united through pressure upon the coating of adhesive after one end has been lapped over the other- Referring to the drawing indetail wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views; I0 is a fragment of a large sheet of paper, fabric or other suitable material, having delineated thereon a plurality of shaped bands II. The shape of bands I I is that commonly used for encircling and enhancing the appearance of cigars, confections and other cylindrical articles. If printed, bands II are arranged on a large sheet I0 and a plurality thereof are printed in a plurality of parallel rows I2. After the printing operations are completed the parallel rows I2 of bands II are separated from each other along the lines indicated as I3 in Fig. 1 for the subsequent operation of dieing out individual bands II to the form. shown in Fig. 3.

Before separating the parallel rows I2 of bands IIv from each other, I prefer to apply areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 on the obverse and reverse sides respectively of sheet Ill to coincide with the respective ends It and ll of bands II. The areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 may be applied to the sheet I0 through use of wellknown printing presses or other instrumentalities which provide for applying inks, gums or varnishes in controlled or registered positions on a sheet.

It will be noted that I have illustrated the areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 to be less than the areas of band ends I6 and I! to provide uncoated surface areas I8 and I9 at the band ends I6 and I1 and lying between the coated areas I4 and I5 The purpose of the uncoated areas I8 and I9 will now be described: After sheet Ill has been coated with adhesive areas I4 and I5 as before set forth, it is then cut into parallel rows II! of a plurality of bands II as indicated by lines I3. When cutting sheet Ill into parallel rows I2 it is customary to operate upon a pile or "lift of approximately 500 sheets. Should the bands be embossed, then the lift of sheets handled is greatly lessened in number due to swell in the embossing. After the sheets II) have been cut apart along lines I3, the separate lifts or piles are then fed through a machine employing a die plate which cuts through the lift and removes a lift of individual bands or flat strips II at each operation.

. By providing the uncoated areas I8 and I9 around the areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 and controlling these areas I8 and I9 in register with the ends I6 and I I of bands II, I provide an operating space for passage. of a cutting machine knife when cutting the pile or "lift of sheets III at lines I3 and the die plates when separating the individual bands or flat strips I I. It is thus clear that the coatings of adhesive I4 and I5 will not be eng'aged by either of these instrumentalities. I have found that in applying coatings of adhesive without my uncoated protective areas I81 and I9 therearound, to sheets that are to be subsequently cut up into small flat strips or parts, that the adhesive tends to follow the cutting or dieing instrumentality and drag and smear along the edges of the work being cut, thus imiting the together at the edges and bands in such condition are exceedingly diflicult if not impossible of handling in automatic applying machines.

In the form of band shown in Fig. 2 the operation of applying the areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 are carried out in the identical manner before described including providing the uncoated protective areas l8 and I9 around the coated areas I4 and I5 at the band ends I6 and II. All of the operations necessary to produce a band or fiat strip II such as shown in Figs. 1, 3 and 4 are also necessary to produce a band or flat strip 2| such as shown in Figs. 2, 5 and 6, with the exception that, as band 2i is oblong in form, the usual cutting operation alone is employed. Fragment of sheet 20 of Fig. 2 comprises a plurality of bands 2I in a plurality of rows 22 similar to those described for sheet III of Fig. 1. After the areas of adhesive coatings I4 and I5 have been applied to sheet 20 by printing, gumming or spotting on well-known instrumentalities, in registered location, sheet 20 is cut up into a plurality of single bands or fiat strips 2| as indicated at 23 and 24.

The adhesive that I prefer to employ in connection with my improved band and the methodsof producing same, is one in which, when in a dry state, adherence or coherence will occur only between coatings of the same substance. Such an adhesive, and one which I find suitable for my purpose, is prepared by dissolving India or Para rubber in gasoline or benzine to proper consistency for application by printing presses or gumming machines to my improved band. I have also found that pure latex may also be adapted to my purpose. The solution is printed, spotted or gummed. onto the sheets in the well-known manner and upon evaporation of the solvent the residue becomes a dry adhesive that will not adhere or cohere to other than coatings of the same substance. In view of the fact that dry coatings having the foregoing properties have become generally known in the art as dry adhesive, I have used this term in the appended claims.

While I have described my improved band as being a band printed upon or produced from a large sheet, it is obvious that any printing operations relating to the band may be eliminated and only the operations of applying controlled areas of adhesive coating in controlled places uponthe sheet, employed. Also it will be obvious that I can produce my improved band in single rows by. printing on or producing from small sheets.

My improved band may be applied to the article by well-known instrumentalities or by hand in the usual manner, excepting that after the article has been encircled by the band, the overlapped ends of the band are pressed to cause the coatings of adhesive to adhere to each other and thus unite the band ends.

It will appear from the foregoing that I have provided an improved and novel form of encircling bandhaving a coating of adhesive at each end on opposite sides thereof and which adhesive by adherence under pressure will unite together the ends of the band.

It will also appear that I have provided in such a band one that does notrequire paste, glue, mucilage or other wet adhesives at the time of application of the band to the article to be encircled and that-smearing and other disadvanin its manufacture and in its use in automatic applying machines.

It will also appear that I have provided a band having protective areas lying between the edges of the adhesive coatings and the band edges.

It will also appear that I have provided a method of applying such adhesive coatings that the location thereof is controlled to avoid difl'iculties normally encountered in band manufacture.

It will also appear that I have provided a method by which an adhesive coating of the character described-may be applied to a plurality of bands through the use of well-known devices and at the same time difliculties of manufacture resulting from the use thereof are avoided.

Having thus described my invention and pointed out the features which are new, what I claim is:-

l. A flat strip to be used as an encircling band, said strip having a coating of dry adhesive located at each end on opposite sides thereof and uncoated protective areas between the outer edges of the coatings of dry adhesive and the strip edges.

2. A flat strip to be used as an encircling band. said strip having a coating of latex adhesive located at each end on opposite sides thereof and uncoated protective areas between the outer edges of the coatings of latex adhesive and the strip edges.

3. A flat strip to be used as an encircling band, said strip having a. coating of rubber adhesive located at each end on opposite sides thereof and uncoated protective areas between the outer edges of the coatings of rubber adhesive and the strip edges.

4. A flat strip to be used as an encircling band,

said strip having a coating of dry adhesive 10- OTTO C. SEMONSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2732063 *Feb 20, 1952Jan 24, 1956 Wrapper
US3106720 *Nov 1, 1960Oct 15, 1963Schreter Arnold HBow tie construction
US3164249 *Mar 7, 1961Jan 5, 1965Paxton Floyd GBag closures united in strip form
US3257677 *Aug 19, 1964Jun 28, 1966Batchelder Rubico IncReleasable attaching device
US3510047 *Feb 28, 1968May 5, 1970Elwood Ind IncCardboard carton
US3975590 *Dec 16, 1974Aug 17, 1976Exxon Research And Engineering CompanyFacsimile copy medium magazine
US4054884 *Jul 6, 1976Oct 18, 1977Exxon Research And Engineering CompanyFacsimile copy medium
US4268567 *Aug 27, 1979May 19, 1981Harmony Richard CInsulator for canned drinks
US4342808 *Feb 25, 1980Aug 3, 1982H. J. Langen & Sons LimitedRoll stock for use in manufacture of bag
US4633565 *Oct 16, 1985Jan 6, 1987Barnhart Industries, Inc.Fasteners for apparel and methods of manufacturing them
US4882211 *Aug 3, 1988Nov 21, 1989Moore Business Forms, Inc.Paper products with receptive coating for repositionable adhesive and methods of making the products
US5745958 *Apr 18, 1997May 5, 1998Kaldor; AlanCable-bundling band
US6261668 *Apr 29, 1999Jul 17, 2001Aranka NagyKitchen cabinet cover
US20030075646 *Oct 18, 2001Apr 24, 2003Womack Christopher C.Cable management device
USRE30008 *Mar 15, 1977May 22, 1979Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Facsimile apparatus and method of operation
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/17.00R, 206/813, 24/17.00A, 428/194, 229/118, 24/DIG.110, 24/67.00R, 24/67.0AR, 428/195.1
International ClassificationA24D1/16
Cooperative ClassificationY10S24/11, Y10S206/813, A24D1/16
European ClassificationA24D1/16