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Publication numberUS2096371 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1937
Filing dateJan 15, 1936
Priority dateJan 15, 1936
Publication numberUS 2096371 A, US 2096371A, US-A-2096371, US2096371 A, US2096371A
InventorsCavanagh John F
Original AssigneeBoston Wire Stitcher Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fastener applying device
US 2096371 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 19, 1937. J. F. CAVANAGH FASTENER APPLYING DEVICE Filed Jan. 15, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 j W 9W. 7 w H mm W A Z 5 i/ z. 4? a 7 A z fig y Oct. 19', 1937. J, F, AVANA H 2,096,371

ms'rsunn APPLYING DEVICE Filed Jan. 15, 1956 s Sheets-Sheet 2 Oct. 19, 1937. J. F. CAVANAGH FASTENER APPLYING DEVICE Filed Jan. 15, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 V v .I. f

Patented Oct. 19, 1 937 UNITED STATES FASTENER APPLYING DEVICE John F. Cavanagh, Providence, R. I., assignor to Boston Wire Stitcher Company, Portland, Maine, a corporation of Maine Application January 15, 1936, Serial No. 59,256

21 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in fastener-applying devices such as stapling implements for attaching papers and other sheets, for securing tags and labels to articles of commerce 5 and for use generally in fastening or stitching together various other objects.

One object of the present invention is to provide an implement of the type indicated including an arm comprising a magazine for containing 10 a supply of staples and a stapling head mounted on the arm and movable toward and away from the end thereof so that the magazine may be loaded with a supply of staples at the forward end of the implement.

Another object of the invention is to provide an implement of the type indicated including means adapted to engage the staples in the magazine to prevent their ejection therefrom and actuated by the head when moved into cooperative relationship with the end of the arm to release the staples.

Another object of the invention is to provide an implement of the type indicated having stapleapplying mechanism comprising a simple and compact arrangement of elements which may be quickly assembled exteriorly of the implement as a unit and slid into operative position in the head.

Another object of the invention is to provide an implement of the type indicated in which the staple-applying mechanism is adjustable longitudinally of the base on which it is mounted for cooperation with either of two spaced pairs of clincher-grooves on the base.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an implement of the type indicated with its mechanism so constructed and arranged that in the event of staples becoming jammed therein they may be quickly released by swinging back the head.

Further objects of the improvement are set forth in the following specification which describes a preferred form of construction of the invention, by way of example, as illustrated by the accompanying drawings. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a stapleapplying implement incorporating the improved features constituting the subject-matter of the present invention;

'Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the implement shown in Fig. 1 illustrated with the actuating knob of the stapling mechanism removed to reveal the cooperative relationship of the elements in the head;

Fig. 3 is a front elevational iew of the implement shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 2 showing the stapling arm raised to receive the work therebeneath;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 showing the relationship of the elements at the completion a stapling operation;

Fig. 6 is a transversesectional view taken on line 8-6 of Fig. showing the pivotal mounting for the arm on the base;

Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view taken on line 'l--'l of Fig. 5 showing the staple-driver and the interlocking means for connecting it with the actuating plunger for movement therewith;

Fig. 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of the head taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 2 showing the cooperating pawl-and-ratchet means for preventing return of the staple-driver until a full stroke has been completed;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 showing the staple-driver at the end of its driving stroke and the relationship of the paWl-and-ratchet means;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 8 showing the relationship of the pawl-and-ratchet means during the return stroke of the staple-driver;

Fig. 11 is a transverse sectional view taken on line ll-ll of Fig. 4 showing the mounting for the staple-retaining pawl on the stapling arm;

Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing the stapling arm moved longitudinally of the base to aline the stapling head with an alternate pair of clincher-grooves;

Fig. 13 is a front elevational view of the implement shown in Fig. 12 with the head and base illustrated as partly broken away and showing the legs of the staples bent outwardly by the clincher-grooves to pin the work;

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Fig. l with the head and arm illustrated partly in section and showing the head moved away from the end of the arm to permit the magazine to be loaded with a supply of staples; and

Fig. 15 is a front elevational view of the stapling arm and head in the relationship illustrated in Fig. 14. a

In general, the present improved implement comprises a base having an arm hinged thereto with a stapling head at its forward end. The arm is constructed as a magazine for holding a supply of staples and the stapling head is pivotally or otherwise suitably mounted on the arm for movement away from the end thereof to provide for loading the magazine with a supply of staples. The head cooperates with the end of the arm to provide a throat through which the staples are driven and means are provided for latching the in cooperative relationship with the end of the arm. Staple-applying mechanism carried'by-the head is adapted to be assembled exteriorly of the implement and slid into the head "as'a unit. The staple-applying mechanism in the portion 5 with a depression 6 formed therein for receiving a clincher-anvil I. The upper face of the anvil I has a forwardly-positioned pair of clincher-grooves 8 for clinching the legs of a staple s inwardly as shown in Figs. 1 and l; and a second pair of clincher-grooves 9 spaced rearwardly of the grooves 8 for bending the ends of the legs outwardly as shown in Figs. 1 and 13. On the under side of the base 2 below the anvil I is a cleat i9 and the parts are held in assembled relationship by a depending stud H on the anvil l which extends through the base 2, cleat l and a spacer element therebetween with a nut l2 screwed onto the threaded end of the stud and engaging the cleat. As shown in detail in Fig. 7, the cleat ill extends transversely of the base 2 and has bent portions i3 engaging the opposite beveled sides of the rim 4 and terminating in inwardly-directed end flanges l4. A rubber pad l formed with beveled sides is fitted within the base 2 and'held in place by the engagement of the flanges M with slits iii in the sides of the pad. To mount the pad l5 the slits it are alined with the flanges l4 on the cleat I0 and then slid longitudinally thereof, the central portion of the pad being cut away as at I! to provide a space for the nut l 2.

At its opposite or rearward end the base 2 is provided with laterally-spaced upstanding flanges and 2|, preferably formed by the opposite sides or legs of a U-shaped member 23 extending upwardly through laterally-spaced slots in the base, see Figs. 1 and 6. The web 24 of the U-shaped member 23 engages the underside of the base 2 and below the web is a cleat 25, similar to the cleat II), for holding a rubber pad 26. The mem-- ber 23 and cleat 25 are-held in assembled relationship on the base 2 by a screw 21 which extends through the parts with a nut 28 screwed onto its end to engage the cleat, see Fig. 4. The opposite flanges 29 and 2| have alined arcuately shaped slots 30 and 3| and mounted on the base 2 between the flanges is a U-shaped leaf-spring 32 having spaced legs 33 which are bowed to aline with the central portion of the slots at the inner sides of the flanges. The spring 32 embraces the screw 21 and is held in place on the base by the engagement of the head of the screw therewith. A leaf-spring 34 is mounted on the underside of the base intermediate its ends by means of a rivet, bolt 35 or the like passing through the base and one end of the spring. The opposite free end of the spring 34 supports a button or plug 36 which extends upwardly through a suitable aperture 31 in the base. Preferably, the button 38 has a reduced stem 38 projecting from its bottom through a hole in the spring 32.

The stapling arm 40 is pivotally mounted be- I edges of tween the flanges 20 and 2| on the base 2, the arm being preferably constructed from sheetmetal folded into channel shape its sides bent inwardly to provide over hanging lateral flanges 4|,"see Figs. 4 and 11. The bottom wall 42 of the arm 40 is slitted adjacent its rearward end to form a narrow longitudlnally-extending strap 43 which is bent downwardly and deformed to provide a bearing groove 44 at its center as shown in Fig. 4. The arm 40 fits closely between the flanges 29 and 2| and the width of the strap 43 is such as to fit closely between the opposite legs 33 of the U-shaped spring 32, see Fig. 6. A pivot-pin 45 extends through the curved slots 30 and 3| in the flanges 2i) and 2| and through the bearing groove 44 in the strap 43 in abutting relation to the under side of the arm 49, being engaged by the opposite legs 33 of the spring 32 to hold it at either one or the other end of the curved slots. By sliding thearm 49 longitudinally of the base 2 the pivot-pin 45 may be transferred from one end to the other 01' the slots 30 and 3|, the legs 33 of the spring 32 yielding to permit movement of the pin. The arm 4|! when so mounted is yieldingly held with itsforward end in its raised position by the resiliently mounted button 36 engaging its under side.

Extending longitudinally of the channel of the arm 40 is a staple-core 46 constructed of sheetmetal folded into channel shape. The staplecore 46 is secured to the bottom wall 42 of the arm 40 in any suitable manner, such as by the rivets 41 shown in Fig. 4, with its sides spaced inwardly from the sides of the arm and its upper edges terminating short of the lateral flanges 4|, see Fig. 11. The staples s are supported on the staple-core 46 in straddled relation thereacross to adapt them to slide within the arm 40 as they are retained thereon by the overlying flanges 4|.

with the upper A staple-pusher 50 of a generally U-shape is mounted in the stapling arm 40 to slide on the top of the staple-core 46. The staple-pusher 50 is urged forwardly under the tension of an elastic cord5l, of latex or the like, having one end connected thereto and extending forwardly around a guide-post 52 riveted or otherwise fastened to the forward end of the arm 40. The

cord 5| extends rearwardly from the post 52 with its opposite end connected to across-pin 53 at the rearward end of the arm by means of a ter minal clasp 54, see Fig. 4. The staples are inserted at the forward end of the arm 49 by forcing the staple-pusher 50 rearwardly against the tension of the cord 5|, the pusher acting to feed the staples forwardly when released.

A staple-retainer 51 is provided at the forward end of the arm 40, being adapted to engage the staples s and prevent them from sliding forwardly under the action of the staple-pusher 59 while the head 10 is raised or open, see Figs. 11 and 14. The staple-retainer 51 is pivotally mounted on a pin 58 extending between spaced stanchions 59 and 60' on the arm 40, the stanchions being construction a predetermined length of stapling arm 49 may be cut from a longer length of channel-strip for use in a particular machine and the bracket 6I attached thereto, thereby effecting a considerable saving in the material required for manufacture.

The staple-retainer 51 is preferably formed of sheet-metal folded or bent to form a U-shaped element having opposite sides 63 connected by 'a web 64 and adapted to fit closely between the stanchions 59 and 69. One of the sides 63 of the element 51 is sharpened to form the beak of a pawl 65 which is normally urged into engagement with the staples s by a spring 66 coiled about the pivot-pin 58 and having one end engaging the web 64 and its opposite end engag- When the pawl 65 is ing a suitable abutment. in engagement with the staples s as illustrated in Fig. 14 the connecting web 64 is inclined to and projects beyond the forward edges of the stanchions 59 and 69, being adapted to be engaged by the staple-applying mechanism and moved to release the pawl from the staples when the head 19 of the implement is closed on the arm 49.

In accordance with the present invention the stapling head 19 is mounted on the arm 49 for movement toward and away from its end to provide for loading the magazine with a supply of staples at the forward end of the arm. As herein illustrated, the head 19 is pivotally mounted but it is to be understood that the head may be mounted for vertical movement away from the arm 49, for horizontal movement with respect thereto, or for combined vertical and horizontal movement to accomplish the function. In

the present preferred embodiment of the invention the head 19 is in the form of a box-like housing having a front wall 1| and rearwardlyextending side walls 12 having their edge portions 13 bent inwardly toward each other. The head 19 is adapted to enclose the stanchions 59 and 69 of the bracket 6| with the lower portion of its front and side walls 1| and 12 engaging the end of the arm 49. A pin 14 extends between the sides 12 of the head 19 and through latch the head in a closed position with respect,

to the end of the arm 49. A coiled tension-spring 99 extends between a bent finger 8I on the bracket 6i and the pivot-pin 14 to yieldingly hold the ears 16 on the head 19 in engagement with the notches 19 on the bracket. The spring 89 is adapted to yield to permit the head 19 to be moved upwardly on the stanchions 59 and 69 to release the latching ears 16 and 18 and permit the head to be rocked on the pin 14 away from the end of the arm 49. With the head latched in its closed relationship the lower portion of its front wall. 1I cooperates with the end of the arm 49 to form a throat 82 through which the staples s are driven into the work. To this end the bottom wall 42 of the arm 49 and the end of the stapling core 46 are cut away to form a space slightly greater than the thickness of the staples s, thus leaving forwardly-projecting side walls on the stapling arm 49, the edges of which are engaged by the front wall H of the head 19 when the latter is closed against the arm, see

Figs. 12 and 14. The bottom wall 42 of the stapling arm 49 also has rearwardly-extending slots 93 at its forward end adjacent the throat 82 to provide a clearance for the legs of deformed staples to prevent them from jamming as they are driven.

The staple-applying mechanism is carried in the head 19, being adapted to be assembled exteriorly of the implement and slid bodily into the head as a unit. As shown in Figs. 2 and 4, the staple-applying mechanism includes a channelshaped plunger 85 having side walls 86 engaging the side walls 12 of the head 19 with a close sliding fit and a rearward wall 81 spaced from the front wall H. The rearward wall 81 terminates short of the ends of the side walls 86 and has a centrally-positioned lug 88 projecting rearwardly therefrom. The rearward edge of one of the extended side walls 86 has V-shaped notches 89 in the nature of ratchet-teeth formed thereon .with a clearance slot 99 above the notches, see Fig. 8. The plunger 85 projects upwardly through the open top of the head 19 and has a hand-rest or knob 9I at its upper end.

The staple-driver 92 is mounted in the head 19 between the forward edges of the side walls 86 of the plunger 85 and the front wall H of the head and has marginal slots 93 at its edges which interlock with lugs 94 projecting forwardly from the plunger. The upper end of the staple-driver 92 is formed with a projection 95 which engages a slot or opening 96 in the knob 9I while its lower end is reduced to a width equal to that of the staples s to adapt it to pass through the throat 82, see Fig. 7. A retaining plate 91 engages the rearward wall 81 of the plunger 95, being formed with a slot 98 through which the rearwardlyextending lug 88 on the plunger extends and an opening at its side overlying the notches 89 in the edge of the plunger. The upper end of the plate 91 has laterally-extending ears 99 seated in slots I99 in the opposite side walls 12 of the head 19' and at its lower end the plate has a forwardlydirected, right-angular extension I 9| positioned below the plunger 85. The extended portion I9I of the plate 91 is formed with two parallel slots I92, see Fig. 15, and the metal between the slots bent upwardly to provide a bearing I93 which overlies a retaining pin I94. The two lateral portions I95 of the metal are arched below the pin I94 to connect the plate 91 thereto. The pin I94 extends through the'side walls 12 of the head 19 and the alined bent portions of the plateextension IM and has its ends riveted or headed over against the sides of the head to permanently mount the plate 91 in position in the head. The center of the extension of the plate 91 is punched to form an upwardly-projecting abutment or teat I96. A spring I91 is mounted in the channel of the plunger 85 with its upper end engaging the knob 9i and its lower end seated on the abutment I96. The spring I91 acts to normally hold the plunger 85 in raised position, the upward movement of the plunger being limited by the engagement of the rearwardly-projecting lug 88 with the upper end of the guiding slot 98 in the 12 of the head and arranged for cooperation with the notches 89 on the rearward edge of the side wall 86 of the plunger, see Fig. 8. The pawl I09 is held in position to engage the notches 89 by means of a spring IIO extending between a tailpiece III on the pawl and a hook II2 formed on the lower end of the wall 13 of the head 10.

To assemble the staple-applying mechanism in the head 10 the spring I01 is first placed in the channel of the plunger between the spacers I08 and the staple-driver 92 applied to the forward edges of the side walls 86 of the plunger with its slots 93 in engagement with the lugs 94. The retaining plate 91 is then placed against the rearward wall 81 of the plunger 85 with the lug 88 extending through the slot 98 and the spring I01 compressed between the abutment I06 and the knob 9t. The assembled mechanism is next slid bodily into the open end of the head 10 as a unit and the laterally-extending cars 99 on the plate 91 seated in the slots I00. The pin I04 is then passed through the apertures in the sides 12 of the head 10 and through the bearing I09 after which the ends of the pin are riveted or headed over to retain the parts in assembled relationship.

To load the implement with a supply of staples s the head 10 is rocked on its pivot-pin 14 to the position shown in Fig. 14. This is accomplished by first sliding the head 10 upwardly on the stanchions 59 and 60,to release the latching ears 16 from the notches 19, the pivot-pin 14 sliding in the slots 15 against the tension of the spring 80 to accommodate this movement of the head. A supply of staples s preferably in the form of a stick, are slid into the magazine in the arm 40 to straddle the staple-core 46 beneath the side flanges 4| on the arm. The staples s ride under the pawl 65 of the staple-retainer 51 which yields as the staples are pushed rearwardly into the magazine to force the staple-pusher back. When the stick of staples is released, however, the pawl engages with the Staples under the action of its spring 68 to prevent them from being moved forwardly. The head 10 is then rocked On its pivot-pin 14 to the closed position illustrated in Fig. 1.

During the rocking movement of the head 10 the arcuate latching ears 16 on the head 10 ride over the cars 18 on the bracket GI and cam the head upwardly on the stanchions 59 and 60, the spring 80 yielding to permit the pivot-pin 14 to slide in the slots 15 in the stanchions. ing ears 18 and 18 slide by each other and yieldingly engage the adjacent grooves 11 and 19 as the spring 80 expands to latch the head 10 in staple-driving relationship with respect to the end of the arm 40. During the final movement of the head 10 to its closed position the rearward face of the retainer plate 91 engages the projecting web 64 of the staple-retainer 51 and rocks the latter on its pivot-pin 58 to release its pawl 65 from engagement with the staples s. The implement is then ready for operation and the arm 40 may be moved longitudinally of the base 2 to position the staple-driver 92 in cooperative relationship with either one or the other of the spaced pairs of clincher-grooves 8 or 9. As previously explained, the pivot-pin 45 carried by the arm 40 is slidable in the curved slots 30 and 3I and yieldingly held at either end of the slots by the opposite legs 33 of the U-shaped leaf-spring 32.

The work w to be stapled is placed on the anvil 1 and pressure applied on the knob 9I of the plunger 85. This pressure first causes the arm 40 The latch:

to be rocked on its pivot-pin 45 against the action of the spring-pressed button 38 to engage the forward end of the arm with the upper face of the work. Continued pressure then causes the plunger 85 to be depressed against the action of its spring I01 to slide the staple-driver 92 connected therewith downwardly. As the staple-driver 92 descends its lower reduced end engages the crossbar of a staple s moved to a forward position by the staple-pusher 50 and drives it through'the throat 82 and into the work, see Fig. 5. The pair of clincher-grooves 8 or 9 then bend over the legs of the staple into clinching engagement with the underside of the work as shown in Figs 7 and 13. Upon release of the plunger 85 the spring-pressed button 36 raises the arm 40 and the spring I01 acts between the abutment I06 on the retaining plate 91 and the knob 9I to raise the plunger 85 and staple-driver 92 to first position as shown in Figs. 1 and 4. The upward movement of the plunger 85 is limited by the engagement of the rearwardly-extending lug 88 with table upper end of the slot 98 in the retaining plate During the descent of the plunger 85 and staple-driver 92 the pawl I 89 cooperates with the notches 89 to prevent the plunger from being raised until a full stroke has been completed. At the end of a full stroke of the staple-driver 92 the pawl lies positioned in the clearance slot 90, as illustrated in Fig. 9, to permit it to be reversed in position as the plunger 85 is raised. During the return stroke of the plunger 85 ,the pawl I09 is rocked upwardly to the position shown in Fig. 10 where it cooperates with the notches 89 to prevent another staple-driving operation until the plunger has completed its full upward stroke.

A series of staple-applying operations may be made in the manner explained above either continuously or intermittently until the supply of staples s in the magazine is exhausted. To reload the magazine with a fresh supply of staples the head 10 is moved upwardly on the stanchions 59 and 80 and rocked about its pivot-pin 14 in one continuous movement to unlatch the lugs 16 and 18 and carry the head to its open position shown in Fig. 14. Occasionally, due to abusive operation or to a slight defect in a staple, the

staple being driven may be caught or jammedin the'throat 82. As most staple jams are accompanied by the staple-driver 92 becoming locked in its lowermost position the force applied to the knob 9I to return the staple-driver results in opening the head 10 and releasing the jammed staple. Thus the pivotal mounting of the head renders the implement proof against damage or breakage of its parts due to jams even in the hands of an inexperienced operator.

It will be observed that my invention provides a novel form of stapling implement in which the head carrying the stapling mechanism is movable toward and away from the end of the arm on which it is mounted to provide for loading the magazine with a supply of staples or to provide for adjustment of the parts.

It will further be observed that the stapledriving mechanism in the head is of an extremely simple and compact structure and that it may be assembled exteriorly of the'implement to be slid into the head bodily as a unit.

It will still further be observed that because of its simple and compact structure the implement particularly lends itself to economical manufacture and assembly while its mechanism is positive and efficient in operation and adapted for use over long periods of time without repair or replacement of its parts.

While there is herein illustrated and described one preferred embodiment of the invention," it

is to be understood that various modifications may be made in the structure and arrangement of the parts of the device without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Therefore, without limiting myself in this respect, I claim:

1. In a device of the type indicated, an arm for supporting staples, a stapling head mounted on said arm for movement toward and away from its end, said head cooperating with the end. of the arm and forming a throat through which the staples are driven, a staple-driver in said head, cooperating means on the arm and head for securing the parts in staple-driving relationship,

and a spring acting between the arm and head for yieldingly holding the cooperating securing means in engagement.

2. In a device of the type indicated, an arm for supporting staples, means to advance the staples on the arm to be driven across its end, a stapling head mounted on the arm for movement toward and away from its end, said head cooperating with the end of the arm and forming a throat through which the staples are driven, a stapledriver in said head, and means automatically operated to engage the staples when the head is moved away from the arm and to release the staples when the head is moved into engagement with the end of the arm.

3. In a device of the type indicated, an arm for supporting staples, means to advance the staples into position to be driven across the end of the arm, a stapling head mounted on the arm for movement toward and away from its end, said head cooperating with the end of the arm and forming a throat through which the staples are driven, a staple-driver in said head, a pawl pivotally mounted on the arm, and resilient means for rocking the pawl into engagement with the staples when the head is moved away from the end of the stapling arm, said pawl being engaged by the head and rocked to release the staples as the head ismoved into cooperative relation to the end of. the arm.

4. In a device of the type indicated, an arm for supporting a supply of staples, stanchions on the sides of the arm at its forward end, a stapling head pivotally mounted on the stanchions for movement towardand away from the end of the arm, said head cooperating with the end of the arm and forming a throat through which the staples are driven, a staple-driver in said head, a pawl pivotally mounted between the stanchions and adapted to engage the staples, said pawl being adapted to be engaged by the head to rock it to release the staples, and a spring for rocking the pawl to engage it with the staples when the head is moved away from the end of. the

arm.

5. In a stapling machine, an arm, a stapling head, means mounting the stapling head on the arm for movement toward and away from its end, said head having a forward wall cooperating with the end of the arm to form a throat through which the staples are driven, staple-driving means including a pair of relatively movable members with a spring therebetween slidable into said head as a unit, and means for retaining the staple-driving means in the head.

6. A head for a stapling machine comprising a housing having an open end and slots in its opposite walls, staple-driving means in the housing including a reciprocating plunger, a stapledriver connected to one side of the plunger for movement therewith, a plate on the opposite side of the plunger, said plate having retaining lugs for engaging the slots in the housing and retaining means at its lower end, and a pin extending through the housing and retaining means on the plate for supporting the plate in the housing, said staple-driving means being slidable into the housing as a unit through its open end.

7. In a stapling machine, an arm, stanchions on the arm having elongated slots, 9. stapling head embracing the stanchions and having a forward wall cooperating with the end of the arm to form a throat through which the staples are driven, stapling mechanism carried by the head, a pin extending through the head and slots in the stanchions for mounting the head for pivotal movement toward and away from the end of the arm and for bodily movement upwardly on the stanchions, interengaging means on the head and arm for latching the head in engagement with the end of the arm, and a spring for holding the interengaging means on the head and arm in latched relationship while yielding to allow the head to be moved upwardly on the stanchions to release the notches from engagement with the lugs.

8. In a stapling machine, an arm, stanchions on the arm adjacent its forward end and having beveled latching lugs at the sides of the arm and elongated slots at their upper ends, a pawl pivotally mounted between the stanchions and adapted to engage the staples, a stapling head embracing the stanchions and having a forward wall cooperating with the end of the arm to provide a throat through which the staples are driven and enclosing side walls with notches for cooperation with the latching lugs, a pin extending through the head and slots in the stanchions for pivotally mounting the head for swinging movement toward and away from the end of the arm, a spring connected between the stanchions and pin to hold the notches on the head in engagement with the latching lugs on the stanchions, and staple-driving means in the head adapted to engage the pawl to release it from the staples when the head is moved into engagement with the end of the arm.

9. In a stapling machine, a stapling arm comprising a supporting member of U-shaped crosssection, a staple-core within the supporting member and cooperating therewith to provide a magazine for receiving staples, a stapling head at one end of the arm, and a loop depending from the bottom of the arm adjacent the opposite end and forming a bearing for receiving a pin to pivotally mount the arm, said loop and the bottom of the arm embracing the pin.

10. In a stapling machine, a base having spaced flanges adjacent one end with slots formed therein, clincher-grooves arranged in spaced relation on the base, and a stapling arm having a head at one end and a pin at its opposite end with its ends projecting into the slots in the flanges on the base, said pin and slots pivotally mounting the arm and permitting movement thereof longitudinally of the base to position the stapling head in cooperative relation with either of the clincher-grooves.

11. In a stapling machine, a base having spaced flanges adjacent one end with slots formed therein, a bowed spring on the base having opposite branches projecting upwardly and overlying the slots in the flanges centrally thereof, co-operating pairs of clincher-grooves arranged in spaced on the arm for pivotally mounting the latter on the base, said slots permitting movement of the arm longitudinally of the base to position the stapling head in cooperating relation with either of the clincher-grooves and the branches of said spring acting to hold the arm in either one or the other of its operative positions.

'12. In a device of the type indicated, a stapling arm open at its forward end to receive a supply of staples, a core in the arm for supporting the staples, a stapling head having a front wall cooperating with the end of the arm to form a throat through which the staples are driven, means above the core for pivotally mounting the head on the arm to adapt it for swinging movement toward and away from the end of the arm, interengaging means on the arm and head for latching the head in closed position on the arm, and a staple-driver carried by the head and reciprocable in said throat to drive staples advanced along the core.

13. In a fastener-applying device, a support in the form of a magazine for holding a supply of fasteners, a fastener-applying unit having means for driving the fasteners into the work, means for pivoting said fastener-applying unit to rock on an axis located above the support, and means for releasably retaining said fastenerapplying unit in position overlying the end of the support and forming a closure for the magazine therein.

14. In a fastener-applying device, a support, a fastener-applying unit adapted to cooperate with said support to form a throat through which the fasteners are driven, fastener-driving means in said unit, means for pivotally mounting said fastener-applying unit to rock on an axis located above the support whereby it may be opened away therefrom to clear the throat of jammed fasteners, and means for normally retaining the fastener-applying unit in cooperative relation to the support.

15. In a fastener-applying implement, a hollow magazine for containing a supply of fasteners, said magazine being closed at the bottom, top and sides and open at one end, a fastener-applying unit having a portion cooperating with the end of the magazine to form a throat through which the fasteners are driven, means for pivoting said unit to rock on an axis above the magazine to open the end of the latter for the insertion of fasteners, and means for releasably holding said unit in position to close the end of the magazine and form the throat for the fasteners.

16. In a device of the type indicated, a magazine for holding a supply of fasteners, means for pivotally mounting the magazine at its rearward end, a self-contained fastener-applying unit, means connecting the unit to the forward end of the magazine to adapt it for movement relatively thereof to open the end of the magazine to permit fasteners to be supplied thereto, said unit having a front wall cooperating with the end of the magazine to form a throat through which the fasteners are driven, and interengaging means on the magazine and unit for releasably holding the latter in cooperative relation to the end of the magazine to form the throat.

specie-r1 17. In a device of the type indicated, a magazine-arm for holding a supply of fasteners, means at the rearward end of the arm for mounting it for pivotal movement, a self-contained fastenerapplying unit, means at the forward'end of the arm for connecting the unit thereto to adapt it for relative movement thereon, said -unit having a front wall cooperating with the end of the arm to form athroat through which the fasteners are driven, and means for releasably holding the unit in cooperative relation to the end of the arm, said unit being movable away from the end of the arm to open the same whereby fasteners may be supplied to the magazine.

18. In a device of the type indicated, a magazine-arm for holding a supply of fasteners, means at the rearward end of the arm for mounting it for pivotal movement, a self-contained fastenerapplying unit, meansat the forward end of the arm connecting the unit thereto, said connecting means being so constructed and arranged as to adapt the unit for movement on the arm to close its end and form a throat through which the fasteners are driven, and means for releasably holding the unit in cooperative relation to the end of the magazine-arm, said holding means being releasable to adapt the fastener-applying unit to move away from the end of the arm whereby fasteners may be applied to the magazine.

19. In a device of the type-indicated, a magazine-arm for containing a supply of fasteners, means for pivotally mounting the arm at its rearward end, a self-contained fastener-applying unit, means at the forward end of the arm for connecting the fastener-applying unit thereto to adapt it for relative movement thereon to permit fasteners to be supplied to the magazine, said unit having a front wall cooperating with the end of the arm to form a throat through which the fasteners are driven, cooperating latching means on the arm and fastener-applying unit for releasably holding the latter in cooperative relation to the end of the arm to form the throat, and resilient means for yieldingly holding the latching means in engagement.

20. In a device of the type indicated, a magazine-arm, means for pivotally mounting the arm adjacent its rearward end, a self-contained stapling unit, means at the forward end of the arm for pivotally mounting the unit thereon, said unit cooperating with the forward end of the arm to form a throat through which the staples are driven, and means for releasably holding the unit in cooperative relation to the end of the arm, said unit being adapted to swing on its pivot away from the forward end of the arm to permit staples to be supplied to the magazine.

21. In a device of the type indicated, a magazine-arm open at one end, means for pivotally mounting the arm at its opposite end, a hollow housing connected to the arm adjacent its open end for relative movement thereon, said housing

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2675547 *Nov 4, 1949Apr 20, 1954Spencer Herman JStapling machine
US2676318 *May 21, 1953Apr 27, 1954Shlesinger Jr Bernard EdwardAdjustable stapling machine
US3005988 *Feb 12, 1959Oct 31, 1961Joseph M KirtonStapling machine
US4327858 *Dec 26, 1979May 4, 1982Power-Line Sales, Inc.Non jamming head and magazine for fastener driving tool
US6299047 *Oct 1, 1999Oct 9, 2001Erwin Mueller Gmbh & CoStapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/126, 227/121
International ClassificationB25C5/00, B25C5/16, B25C5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/161, B25C5/025
European ClassificationB25C5/02F3B, B25C5/16C1