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Publication numberUS2098412 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1937
Filing dateJun 16, 1936
Priority dateJun 16, 1936
Publication numberUS 2098412 A, US 2098412A, US-A-2098412, US2098412 A, US2098412A
InventorsEverett Bovay Norman
Original AssigneeUs Rubber Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rubber soled footwear
US 2098412 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 9, 1937.

N. E. BovAY RUBBER soLED FOOTWEAR Fil-ed June 16, 1936 Patented.ANev.9,1937 j i l 2,098,412v

UNITED STATES PATENT oEEicE RUBBER' soLEn FOOTWEAR Norman Everett Bovay, Naugatuck, Conn., as- A signor to United States Rubber Products, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application June 16, 193s, serial No. salez 2 claims. (ci. ss-s) My invention relates to rubber soled footwear tern open opposite a sulcient number of the perand more particularly to the ventilation thereof. forations II to provide a desired amount of circu- Inwearing rubber soled footwear objection is lation. In assembling the shoe the inner sole and often made to the lack of ventilation and the confiller are brought together without particular 5 sequent humidity or drawing of the foot of the care to insure the completion of the passageways, 5 wearer. Attempts have heretofore been made to it being left largely to' chance which of the chanventilate such footwear by providing air passagenels oppose particular perforations Il, many of ways through and/or around the rubber sole. In the latter being closed by the flat surfaceof the such previous constructions a careful matching ller. l of openings has been required in assembling the The foxing 6 is provided with a large number of 10 component parts o'f each shoe. In some consmall perforations I5 of the order of qlq inch in structions the outlet openings have been so large diameter. The foxing strip 6 is applied to the asas to admit dirt. sembled shoe upper 2, filler 5, outsole 4, at ran- I provide a ventilated rubber soled shoe in dom with regard to the registration of particuwhich air passageways are provided from the inlar openings I5 with the channel openings I4. 15

terior through the usual foxing which do not re- The spaces between the edges of the perforations quire precise assembling of the shoe parts and I5 are preferably slightly less than the depth or in which the exposed openings are suiiiciently width of the grooves of the pattern i2 and a suilismall to preclude the entrance of objectionable cient number of perforations are provided so thatJ dirt. y they will register with the channel openings i4 to 20 The accompanying drawing illustrates a prescomplete a sufcient number of Ventilating pasv ent preferred embodiment of the invention, in sages'extending from the interior 0f the sole t0 which:- the` outside. The small diameter of the openings Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a canvas and rubl5 also prevents the passage 0f large particles 0f ber shoe embodying my invention; dirt through the foxing and into the channel pat- 25 f Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view thereof tern l2 AlSU. the Presence 0f the Small Openings taken along the section line 2 2 of Fig. 1; in the'foxing adds to the ornamental effect of Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the the S110@- section line 3-3 of Fig. l; and -Accordingly, I have provided a ventilated can- Fig. 4 is a plan view of a sole ller with a porvas and rubber shoe which is easily and cheaply 30 tion of the foxing attached. manufactured and which gives the advantages of Referring to the drawing, I provide a shoe I air circulation withoutpermitting the passageof having an upper 2 preferably of fibrous material, undesirable quantities of dirt and Aat the same usually canvas, an inner sole 3 of -any suitable time gives a pleasing and decorative appearance material, an outer sole 4, and a ller 5, preferto the shoe. 35 ably of rubber composition, and a. rubber foxing While I have shown and. described a. present 6, all of which are united by a vulcanizedbond preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be as is customary in the art. An inner foxing strip understood that the invention may otherwise be 1 is usually secured to the lower edge of the upper embodied within the spirit thereof and the scope 40 2 and curved therewith between the inner sole 3 of the appended claims. 1

and the outer sole 4 for the attachment of the Having now described my invention, what vI foxing 6. If desired,'a toe guard 8 may be applied claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:' over the foxing 6. 1. An article of footwear comprising an upper As is particularly shown in Fig. f2, the inner of fibrous material, an inner sole having a plusole 3 in the heel area 9, and the ball area III is rality of perforations disposed throughout the 45 provided with a multiplicity of small perforations heel `and ball areas, an outer sole of rubber com- II. In an assembled shoe these perforations open* position, a -ller disposed between the outer sole against the upper face of the iiller 5. The latter and the inner sole and having a plurality of chanis provided with a pattern I2 of communicating nels formed in the inner sole engaging face which longitudinal and transverse channels having channels extend to the side edges of the filler and 50 openings I4 along the ller edges S0 that a plu'- are 'in communication with said perforations in lrality of passageways are provided from the in- Ithe inner sole, and a foxing placed around the terior of the shoe to the openings I4. It is to be /edges of the outer sole, the ller and the upper understood that a wide variety of patternsi! mayff and secured to the outer so1e,-illler and upper by be employed, so long as the channels .in the Pata vulcanized bond, said foxing a plurality 55 of small perforations of the order of one-sixteenth inch in diameter, at least some of which are in accidental alignment with the openings of the filler channels whereby passageways are provided for the circulation of air from the interior of the article through the foxing, the admission of dirt through the foxing is materially reduced owing to the small size of the openings, and an ornamental effect is produced.

2. An article of footwear comprising an upper of iibrous material, an inner sole having a plurality of perforations disposed throughout the heel and bail areas, an outer sole of rubber composition, a iler of rubber composition disposed between the outer sole and the inner sole and having a plurality of channels formed in the inner sole engaging face which channels extend to the side edges of the ller and are in communication with said perforations in the inner sole, and a foxing placed around the edges of the outer sole, the filler and the upper and secured to said outer sole, ller and upper by a vulcanized bond, said foxing having a plurality of small perforations of the order of one-sixteenth inch in diameter, at least some of which are in accidental alignment with the openings of the filler channels whereby passageways are provided for the circulation of air from the interior of the article through the foxing, the admission of dirt through the foxing is materially reduced owing to the small size of the openings, and an ornamental effect is produced.

NORMAN EVERE'I'I BOVAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457944 *Jul 10, 1947Jan 4, 1949Andreas G VlastosVentilated shoe
US2545062 *Feb 20, 1948Mar 13, 1951Whittington Paul EVentilating insole
US2558973 *Feb 6, 1948Jul 3, 1951Wesley Meaker JohnVentilated shoe
US2751692 *Nov 19, 1954Jun 26, 1956Joseph CortinaVentilated cushioned shoes
US3012342 *Jul 6, 1960Dec 12, 1961Loza Ramirez EliseoSole assembly for footwear
US4445284 *Feb 18, 1982May 1, 1984Sakutori Eric MFootwear with integral cushioning and ventilating apparatus
US4845863 *Sep 16, 1988Jul 11, 1989Autry Industries, Inc.Shoe having transparent window for viewing cushion elements
US4910887 *Aug 5, 1988Mar 27, 1990The Timberland CompanyBoating shoe
US5400526 *Sep 14, 1993Mar 28, 1995Sessa; Raymond V.Footwear sole with bulbous protrusions and pneumatic ventilation
US5979076 *Jun 9, 1997Nov 9, 1999Li; ZhengVentilating shoe and method of making same
US6305100Feb 24, 1997Oct 23, 2001Eugene KomarnyckyShoe ventilation
US6338206 *Jun 13, 2000Jan 15, 2002Mizuno CorporationAthletic shoe sole design and construction
US6393732Jun 8, 2000May 28, 2002Mizuno CorporationAthletic shoe midsole design and construction
US7178266Dec 7, 2004Feb 20, 2007The Rockport Company, LlcAir circulating shoe
US7337557 *Aug 3, 2005Mar 4, 2008Miyata Co., Ltd.Air-permeable shoe
US7475497Jan 18, 2005Jan 13, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a perforated midsole
US7536808Jan 27, 2006May 26, 2009Nike, Inc.Breathable sole structures and products containing such sole structures
US7774954Dec 22, 2008Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a perforated midsole
US7793426 *Nov 30, 2006Sep 14, 2010C. & J. Clark America, Inc.Vented shoe assembly
US7913421 *May 16, 2007Mar 29, 2011Franco MalenottiFootwear sole with ventilation induced by the Venturi effect
US7918041Sep 4, 2007Apr 5, 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear cooling system
US7997012Jul 20, 2010Aug 16, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a perforated midsole
US8127465Jul 12, 2010Mar 6, 2012C. & J. Clark America, Inc.Vented shoe assembly
US8191284Jan 7, 2011Jun 5, 2012Nike, Inc.Footwear cooling system
US8196315 *Mar 11, 2009Jun 12, 2012Mesp Co., Ltd.Shoe sole with tunnel-type air chambers
US8615835Jul 25, 2011Dec 31, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a perforated midsole
US20110167677 *Jun 8, 2009Jul 14, 2011Marc PeikertItem of Footwear with Ventilation in the Bottom Region of the Upper, and Air-Permeable Spacing Structure Which Can Be Used For This Purpose
EP0350103A2 *Jun 29, 1989Jan 10, 1990Kyun Cheol LeeOne way air-flow shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00R
International ClassificationA43B7/00, A43B7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/06
European ClassificationA43B7/06