Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2100288 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1937
Filing dateJun 27, 1936
Priority dateJun 27, 1936
Publication numberUS 2100288 A, US 2100288A, US-A-2100288, US2100288 A, US2100288A
InventorsHorlacher Elmer L
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2100288 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 23, 1937. E HQRLACHER 2,100,288

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed June 27, 1936 INVENTOR.

v E ik L. Homann/fg, 7 .j BY L Patented Nov. 23, 193.7

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE REFRIGEBATING APPARATUS Application June 27, 1936,V Serial No. 87,758

l1 Claims.

This invention relates to refrigeration and par ticularly to a refrigerating apparatus adapted for household use having means for freezing water placed in molds into ice blocks.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide improved means and method for releasing ice blocks from trays or molds in which they are frozen.

Another object of the invention is to utilize the force created by expansion of a body of water sealed within a container or mold during freezing thereof in the molds to release the 'frozen liquid therefrom.

A further object of the invention is to seal a body of liquid within a mold by placing a cover or lid on the open end of the mold and to utilize pressure created in the mold by freezing and expansion of its liquid content to move the cover away from the mold and to break the bond between the frozen liquid andthe walls of the mold.

A still further and more specic object of the invention is to carry out the foregoing objects in a mold which is disposed in an inverted position while being subjected to cooling so that the weight of ice within the mold aids in the removal thereof therefrom and so that ice blocks can be removed from their molds automatically to thus bereadily harvested from a refrigerator cabinet. n

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawing:

Fig. l is a perspective view of an evaporator of a refrigerating' system;

Fig. 2 is a front view of the evaporator disclosed in Fig. 1 and showing molds or trays constructed according to the present invention posi.. tioned therein;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of the evaporator shown in Figs. 1 and 2 and is taken on the line 8-3 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line I--l of Fig. 3 showing certain molds filled with liquid and showing an ice block being released from a mold.

Referring to the drawing, for illustrating the present invention, I have shown in Fig. 1 thereof a cooling element or evaporator generally represented by the reference character I0 and adapted to be connected in a closed refrigerating sys- 'tem (not shown). The evaporator III'is of the (Cl. (l2-108.5)

sheet metal type and forms walls of a sharp freezing chamber. The walls of the evaporator have a plurality of refrigerant passages or ducts II formed therein between superimposed and secured together sheet metal portions I2 and I3. 5 The passages Il communicate with an upper header I4 and a lower header I5 both formed in the outer sheet metal portion I3 oi' the evaporator I0. A liquid refrigerant inlet connection I8 communicates with the passage I1 which extends across the top and downwardly along a side wall of the evaporator and terminates short of the evaporator bottom wail for a purpose to be presently described. The passage I8 com municates with header I5 and extends across the evaporator bottom wall and part way up the side wall thereof opposite the side wall in which passage I1 is formed. A gaseous refrigerant outlet connection I8 communicates with the upper header I4. A refrigerated shelf 2l formed of 20 superimposed and secured together sheet metal portions 22 and 23 is horizontally disposed between the top and bottom walls of the evaporator I0. This shelf 2i is preferably mounted within the freezing chamber in spaced relation to the 25 side walls of evaporator I0 in any suitable and well-known manner. Shelf 2I is adapted to support trays or rack devices containing a liquid to be frozen. The upper sheet metal member 22 of shelf 2| has three short corrugations 25 formed therein and the lower sheet metal member 23 or the shelf has four relatively long spaced apart corrugations 26 formed therein and extending longitudinally with the freezing chamber. These corrugations 25 and 28 communicate with one another to form a refrigerant passage between the members 22 and 23 of shelf 2l. A short corrugated part 21 formed in member 22 extends outwardly from one end of each of the side corrugations 28 and each receives a pipe 28. The one pipe 28 communicates with the passage I8 on the one side of evaporator i0 and the other pipe 28 communicates with the passage I1 on the other side of the evaporator. Thus a series iiow conduit is provided between the refrigerant inlet connection I8 and header I5 through the shelf 2l. Obviously liquid refrigerant entering the passages Il of evaporator III is directed through passage I1 from the inlet connection I8 thence through pipe 28 and through the passage within shelf 2|, formed by the corrugations 25, 28, and 21, to passage I8 and header I5. Header I8 distributes the incoming refrigerant to the plurality of passages I I and vaporized refrigerant is withdrawn from the passages II and header sliding same along the shelf 2l.

form and extend longitudinally vwith the freezing chamber adjacent the refrigerant passages formed by the corrugations 26. A plurality of trays or racks generally represented by the reference character 3| are adapted to be placed upon the shelf 2| over the openings 23 provided therein. Each tray or rack 3| comprises a thick metallic portion 32 which has a plurality of metal cups or molds 33 soldered or welded thereto. 'I'he thick portion 32 of tray or rack 3| is hollowed out as at 34 so as to position the open bottom end 35 of cups or molds 33 above the bottom edge of portion 32 as disclosed in the drawing to thereby permit the tray or rack device 3| to be moved into or out of the freezing chamber by 'I'he shelf 2|, rack portion 32 and cups 33 are all preferably constructed of a metal of high heat conductivity so as to permit rapid conduction of heat from the liquid to be frozen to the refrigerant in the evaporator. In the present showing the cups 33 are cylindrical in cross-section and the compartment formed thereby tapers outwardly toward their open bottom ends 35. 'Ihe open ends 35 of cups 33 are adapted to be closed by metal lids'or covers 36 in a manner and for a purpose to be presently described. l

The trays or rack devices 3l are adapted to be held in an upright position so that water may be inserted into the cups or molds 33. After all the cups or molds 33 of one rack device have been filled with water the covers or lids 36 are placed over the open ends of the cups to close the liquid within the same. Before proceeding further with the description it is to be' understood that the edges of the open ended cups 33 are true and devoid of variations in `a horizontal plane. The lids or covers 36 are likewise at and true so as to fit snugly against the edges of the open ends of the cups. The true fit of lids or covers 26 upon the edges of the cups'33 thereby .seal the open ends thereof to confine the liquid within the cups. The rack device 3|, after having placed the lids 36 upon the cups 33, is inverted and the close fit of lids 36 With-cups 33 provides a lltv which is air-tight. Since thev interior of the cups is lled with water no air tends to enter the cups and since no air can enter the cups the body of liquid is trapped therein and will not flow therefrom. Thus the lids or covers 36 are tightly held upon the cups 33 to close their open ends when the rack is inverted to thereby prevent the flow of liquid from the cups. 'I'he racks 3| with their sealed cups 33 are placed in an inverted position within the freezing chamber formed by the evapf orator and supported upon the refrigerated shelf support 2|. The longitudinal corrugations 26 in the top sheet metal plate 22 of shelf 2| form tracks for guiding the rack devices 3| u pon shelf' 2| and space the devices, 3| apart as shown in Figs. 2 and 4 of the drawing. While the rack devices 3| are positioned on shelf 2| refrigerant flowing through the refrigerant passage formed by-corrugations 25 and 26 withdraws heatfrom the rack device 3| and from the liquid content of cups or molds 33 to cause freezing of the liquid within the molds.

Referring now to Fig, 4 of the drawing it will be noted that the cup or mold 33 of the one rack device 3| is shown as being filled with water, that the liquid content of .cup 33 of the central rack device 3| is shown as being partially frozen and having a pocket formed in the ice near the permanently closed end of the cup or mold 33 and that the ice block in the cup or mold 33 of the end rack device 3| has been completely frozen to cause removal of the ice block from its mold. It is to be understood that ice forms within the cups or molds 33 continuously around theirv inner wall surfaces in a direction inwardly of the walls and upwardly of the cover or lid 36,- and since a central part of the ice block within the molds near or adjacent the permanently closedend of the molds is the last point to freeze, due to its rather remote position from the heat removing means, a pocket similar to that shown in the mold of the center rack device 3| of Fig. 4 is formed. As the liquid and slush ice within this pocket freezes solid it causes, due to expansion thereof, the wall of ice above the pocket and adjacent the permanently closed end of mold 33 to burst. The expansion or deformation of the wall of ice above the pocket causes the ice to apply force to the permanently closed end of the cup or mold 33 and vthis force breaks the`bondv between the ice blockl and its mold and causes movement of the ice b lock relative to walls of the mold to thus move the lid or cover 36 away from the cup 33.

If expansion of the ice within mold 33 against its permanently closed end tends to bulge the closed end outwardly this will increase the pressure applied upon the ice block and the closed end of the mold 33 will then aid in the removal of the block of ice from the mold. It is to be understood that the bursting or fracture of the ice wall above the pocket within the block of ice and movement of the ice block .occur substantially simultaneously. The pressure created Within the sealed mold by complete freezing of liquid trapped therein breaks the bond between the ice block and walls of the mold 33 and moves the ice block together with the lid or cover 36 relative to the mold. Theweight of the ice block permits same to fall by gravity ino a pan or receptacle 33 disposed Within the freezing chamber formed by the evaporator and supported upon the bottom wall of the evaporator as disclosed in Fig. 2 of the drawing. 'I'he ice blocks may be stored within the pan or receptacle 38 until desired for use in cooling drinks or the like. The lid or cover 36 will be released from anice block by heat-absorbed from the hands of the operator during handling of the block.

From the foregoing it will be seen that Ihave provided an improved apparatus for and method of releasing ice blocks from molds within av mechanically refrigerated cabinet particularly of the household type. My invention provides an apparatus from which the ice blocks will be released automatically and without attention. My improved apparatus provides for the removal of one or a plurality of ice blocks as desiredv from an evaporator of a refrigerating system without the necessity of actuating mechanically operated or the like devices as has heretofore been the practice.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it -is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A refrigerating apparatus comprising in combination, a cooling element, a support on said cooling element, a device supported on said support and provided with a mold having an open bottom and adapted to contain a liquid to be frozen, means for closing the open bottom of said mold to seal a liquid therein, said support having an opening beneath the bottom of said mold, said closure means being movable relative to said mold through the opening in said support, and the liquid within said mold upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said support.

2. A refrigerating apparatus comprising in combination, a cooling element, a support on said cooling element, a device supported on said support and provided with a mold having an open bottom and adapted to contain a liquid to be frozen, means for closing the open bottom of said mold to seal a liquid therein, said support having an opening beneath the bottom of said mold, said closure means being movable relative to said mold through the opening in said support, the liquid within said mold upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said support, and means for catching and supporting the frozen block.

3. A refrigerating apparatus comprising in combination, a cooling element, a support on said cooling element, a device supported on said support and provided with a mold having an open bottom and adapted to contain a liquid to be frozen, means for closing the open bottom of said mold to seal a liquid therein, said support having an opening beneath the bottom of said mold, said closure means being movable relative to said mold through the opening in said support, the liquid Within said mold upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said support, and means carried by said cooling element for catching and supporting the frozen blocks.

4. A i'efrigerating apparatus comprising in combination, a cooling element, a supporton said cooling element, a device supported on said support and provided with a plurality of mold members each having open bottoms and adapted to contain a liquid to be frozen, means for closing the open bottoms of said mold members to seal a liquid therein, said support having an opening beneath the bottoms of said mold members, said closure means being movable relative to said mold members through the opening in said support, the liquid within said mold members upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said support. and means carried by said cooling element for catching and storing the frozen blocks in thermal contact with said cooling element.

5. The method of freezing which consists in, filling a mold having a permanently closed end and an open end with a liquid adapted to expand upon freezing, placing a cover over the open end of said mold and inverting the mold to thereby cause the cover to confine the liquid within the mold, freezing the liquid within the mold and applying the expansive force of freezing to the permanently closed end of the mold for removing the cover from the mold to thereby cause the frozen liquid to fall'by gravity from the mold.

6. A refrigerating apparatus comprising in' combination, a cooling element, a support on said cooling element, a metallic device'supported on said support and provided with a plurality of mold members each having open bottoms and side walls converging outwardly toward the open bottoms thereof and adapted to contain a liquid to be frozen, means for closing the open bottoms of said mold members to confine a body of liquid therein, said support having an opening beneath the bottoms of said mold members, said closure means being movable relative to said mold members through the opening in said support, the liquid within said mold members upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said support, and a receptacle removably carried by said cooling element for catching and supporting the frozen blocks.

'1. A freezing device comprising in combination, a support member, a mold member adapted to contain a substance to be frozen carried by said support member and having closed top and side walls and an open bottom, said support member being constructed and arranged so as not to obstruct the open bottom of said mold member carried thereby, means associated with one of said members for closing the open bottom of said mold to seal a substance therein, said closure means being separate from said members and movable relative to the member with which it is associated, and the substance within said mold member upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall by gravity from said freezing device through the open bottom of said mold.

8. A freezing device comprising in combination, a support member, a mold member carried by said support member and having an open end and adapted to contain a substance to be frozen, said support member being constructed and arranged so as not to obstruct the open end of said mold member carried thereby. means associated with one of said members for closing the open end of said mold to seal a substance therein, said closure means being separate from said members and movable relative to the member with which it is associated, and the substance within said mold member upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall by gravity from said freezing device through the open end of said mold.

9. In combination, a freezing support, a mold supported on said freezing support and having an open bottom and adapted to contain a substance to be frozen, means for closing the open bottom of said mold to seal a substance therein, said freezing support having an opening beneath the bottom of said mold, said closure means being movable relative to said mold through the opening in said freezing support, and the substance within said mold upon freezing and expanding therein being released therefrom and moving said closure means to thereby fall through the opening in said freezing support.

10. The method of freezing which consists in, filling a mold having a permanently closed end and an open end `with a substance which expands upon being frozen, placing a cover over the open end of said mold and inverting the' mold to thereby cause the cover to seal the substance within the mold, freezing the substance within the mold and applying the expansive force of freezing to the mold for releasing the frozen submember being constructed and arranged so as not to obstruct the open bottom of said mold' member carried thereby, means associated with one of said members for closing the open bottom of said'mold to seal a substance therein, said closure means being movable relative to the member with which it is associated, and the substance within said mold member upon freezing therein moving said closure means and being released from saidmold through the open bottom 1o thereof. A

ELMER L. HORLACHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2447170 *Aug 24, 1943Aug 17, 1948Paul Dunmire RussellProcess of freezing liquid and apparatus therefor
US3018636 *May 19, 1960Jan 30, 1962Gen Motors CorpFreezing device
US3025682 *Feb 17, 1961Mar 20, 1962Gen Motors CorpIce block making and harvesting
US3039277 *Oct 20, 1960Jun 19, 1962Gen Motors CorpIce block maker
US4942742 *Apr 23, 1986Jul 24, 1990Burruel Sergio GIce making apparatus
US6209849 *Dec 23, 1998Apr 3, 2001H & D Product Development, LlcIce cube tray
US7409794 *Sep 19, 2005Aug 12, 2008Daniel TrianoFishing line casting and bait projectile system
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/71, 62/135, 249/120
International ClassificationF25C1/24, F25C1/22
Cooperative ClassificationF25C1/24
European ClassificationF25C1/24